65 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Robert J. Richards [65]Robert John Richards [1]
  1.  20
    The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe.Robert J. Richards - 2002 - University of Chicago Press.
    "All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one." Friedrich Schlegel's words perfectly capture the project of the German Romantics, who believed that the aesthetic approaches of art and literature could reveal patterns and meaning in nature that couldn't be uncovered through rationalistic philosophy and science alone. In this wide-ranging work, Robert J. Richards shows how the Romantic conception of the world influenced (and was influenced by) both the lives of the people who (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   118 citations  
  2. The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe.Robert J. Richards - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):618-619.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  3.  40
    The Cambridge Handbook of Evolutionary Ethics.Michael Ruse & Robert J. Richards (eds.) - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Evolutionary ethics - the application of evolutionary ideas to moral thinking and justification - began in the nineteenth century with the work of Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, but was subsequently criticized as an example of the naturalistic fallacy. In recent decades, however, evolutionary ethics has found new support among both the Darwinian and the Spencerian traditions. This accessible volume looks at the history of thought about evolutionary ethics as well as current debates in the subject, examining first the claims (...)
    No categories
  4. Kant and Blumenbach on the Bildungstrieb: A Historical Misunderstanding.Robert J. Richards - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (1):11-32.
  5. The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological Reconstruction of Darwin's Theory.Robert J. Richards - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (4):672.
  6.  50
    The innate and the learned: The evolution of Konrad Lorenz's theory of instinct.Robert J. Richards - 1974 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (2):111-133.
  7. The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological Reconstruction of Darwin's Theory.Robert J. Richards - 1993 - Journal of the History of Biology 26 (1):153-156.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  8.  36
    The Cambridge companion to the "Origin of species".Michael Ruse & Robert J. Richards (eds.) - 2008 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin is universally recognized as one of the most important science books ever written. Published in 1859, it was here that Darwin argued for both the fact of evolution and the mechanism of natural section. The Origin of Species is also a work of great cultural and religious significance, in that Darwin maintained that all organisms, including humans, are part of a natural process of growth from simple forms. This Companion commemorates the 150th anniversary (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  95
    4 Darwin on mind, morals and emotions.Robert J. Richards - 2003 - In J. Hodges & Gregory Radick (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Darwin. Cambridge University Press. pp. 92.
  10. Was Hitler a Darwinian?Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Several scholars and many religiously conservative thinkers have recently charged that Hitler’s ideas about race and racial struggle derived from the theories of Charles Darwin (1809-1882), either directly or through intermediate sources. So, for example, the historian Richard Weikart, in his book From Darwin to Hitler , maintains: “No matter how crooked the road was from Darwin to Hitler, clearly Darwinism and eugenics smoothed the path for Nazi ideology, especially for the Nazi stress on expansion, war, racial struggle, and racial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  11. Michael Ruse's Design for Living.Robert J. Richards - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):25 - 38.
    The eminent historian and philosopher of biology, Michael Ruse, has written several books that explore the relationship of evolutionary theory to its larger scientific and cultural setting. Among the questions he has investigated are: Is evolution progressive? What is its epistemological status? Most recently, in "Darwin and Design: Does Evolution have a Purpose?," Ruse has provided a history of the concept of teleology in biological thinking, especially in evolutionary theorizing. In his book, he moves quickly from Plato and Aristotle to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  12.  8
    Influence of Sensationalist Tradition on Early Theories of the Evolution of Behavior.Robert J. Richards - 1979 - Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (1):85.
  13. Darwin's principles of divergence and natural selection: Why Fodor was almost right.Robert J. Richards - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):256-268.
    In a series of articles and in a recent book, What Darwin Got Wrong, Jerry Fodor has objected to Darwin’s principle of natural selection on the grounds that it assumes nature has intentions.1 Despite the near universal rejection of Fodor’s argument by biologists and philosophers of biology (myself included),2 I now believe he was almost right. I will show this through a historical examination of a principle that Darwin thought as important as natural selection, his principle of divergence. The principle (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14. Arguments in a Sartorial Mode, or the Asymmetries of History and Philosophy of Science.Robert J. Richards - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:482 - 489.
    History of science and philosophy of science are not perfectly complementary disciplines. Several important asymmetries govern their relationship. These asymmetries, concerning levels of analysis, evidence, theories, writing, and training show that to be a decent philosopher of science is more difficult than being a decent historian. But to be a good historian-well, the degree of difficulty is reversed.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15.  59
    What-if history of science: Peter J. Bowler: Darwin deleted: Imagining a world without Darwin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, ix+318pp, $30.00 HB.Peter J. Bowler, Robert J. Richards & Alan C. Love - 2014 - Metascience 24 (1):5-24.
    Alan C. LoveDarwinian calisthenicsAn athlete engages in calisthenics as part of basic training and as a preliminary to more advanced or intense activity. Whether it is stretching, lunges, crunches, or push-ups, routine calisthenics provide a baseline of strength and flexibility that prevent a variety of injuries that might otherwise be incurred. Peter Bowler has spent 40 years doing Darwinian calisthenics, researching and writing on the development of evolutionary ideas with special attention to Darwin and subsequent filiations among scientists exploring evolution (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  41
    Darwin’s principles of divergence and natural selection: Why Fodor was almost right.Robert J. Richards - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):256-268.
  17.  84
    Dutch objections to evolutionary ethics.Robert J. Richards - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):331-343.
    While strolling the streets of Amsterdam, Sidney Smith, the renowned editor of the Edinburgh Review, called the attention of his companion to two Dutch housewives who were leaning out of their windows and arguing with one another across the narrow alley that separated their houses. Smith remarked to his companion that the two women would never agree. His friend thought the seasoned editor had in mind the stubborn Dutch character. No, said Smith. Rather it was because they were arguing from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  18.  37
    Instinct and intelligence in British natural theology: Some contributions to Darwin's theory of the evolution of behavior.Robert J. Richards - 1981 - Journal of the History of Biology 14 (2):193-230.
    In late September 1838, Darwin read Malthus's Essay on Population, which left him with “a theory by which to work.”115 Yet he waited some twenty years to publish his discovery in the Origin of Species. Those interested in the fine grain of Darwin's development have been curious about this delay. One recent explanation has his hand stayed by fear of reaction to the materialist implications of linking man with animals. “Darwin sensed,” according to Howard Gruber, “that some would object to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  19.  32
    The natural selection model of conceptual evolution.Robert J. Richards - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (3):494-501.
  20.  8
    Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions at fifty: reflections on a science classic.Robert J. Richards & Lorraine Daston (eds.) - 2016 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Thomas S. Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions was a watershed event when it was published in 1962, upending the previous understanding of science as a slow, logical accumulation of facts and introducing, with the concept of the “paradigm shift,” social and psychological considerations into the heart of the scientific process. More than fifty years after its publication, Kuhn’s work continues to influence thinkers in a wide range of fields, including scientists, historians, and sociologists. It is clear that The Structure (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  37
    If This be Heresy: Haeckel=s Conversion to Darwinism.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Just before Ernst Haeckel’s death in 1919, historians began piling on the faggots for a splendid auto-da-fé. Though more people prior to the Great War learned of Darwin’s theory through his efforts than through any other source, including Darwin himself, Haeckel has been accused of not preaching orthodox Darwinian doctrine. In 1916, E. S. Russell, judged Haeckel's principal theoretical work, Generelle Morphologie der Organismen, as "representative not so much of Darwinian as of pre-Darwinian thought."1 Both Stephen Jay Gould and Peter (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22. Darwin's metaphysics of mind.Robert J. Richards - 2005 - In V. Hoesle & C. Illies (eds.), Darwin and Philosophy. Notre Dame University Press. pp. 166-80.
    Our image of Darwin is hardly that of a German metaphysician. By reason of his intellectual tradition—that of British empiricism—and psychological disposition, he was a man of apparently more stolid character, one who could be excited by beetles and earthworms but not, we assume, by abstruse philosophy. Yet Darwin constructed a theory of evolution whose conceptual grammar expresses and depends on a certain kind of metaphysics. During his youthful period as a romantic adventurer, he sailed to exotic lands and returned (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  16
    Birth, death, and resurrection of evolutionary ethics.Robert J. Richards - 1993 - In Matthew Nitecki & Doris Nitecki (eds.), Evolutionary Ethics. Suny Press. pp. 113--131.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24.  76
    James Gibson's passive theory of perception: A rejection of the doctrine of specific nerve energies.Robert J. Richards - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (December):218-233.
  25.  10
    The Emergence of Evolutionary Biology of Behaviour in the Early Nineteenth Century.Robert J. Richards - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (3):241-280.
    The sciences of ethology and sociobiology have as premisses that certain dispositions and behavioural patterns have evolved with species and, therefore, that the acts of individual animals and men must be viewed in light of innate determinates. These ideas are much older than the now burgeoning disciplines of the biology of behaviour. Their elements were fused in the early constructions of evolutionary theory, and they became integral parts of the developing conception. Historians, however, have usually neglected close examination of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  54
    The Relation of Spencer's Evolutionary Theory to Darwin's.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Our image of Herbert Spencer is that of a bald, dyspeptic bachelor, spending his days in rooming houses, and fussing about government interference with individual liberties. Beatrice Webb, who knew him as a girl and young woman recalls for us just this picture. In her diary for January 4, 1885, she writes: Royal Academy private view with Herbert Spencer. His criticisms on art dreary, all bound down by the “possible” if not probable. That poor old man would miss me on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  8
    Darwinian Heresies.Abigail Lustig, Robert J. Richards & Michael Ruse (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Darwinian Heresies, which was originally published in 2004, prominent historians and philosophers of science trace the history of evolutionary thought, and challenge many of the assumptions that have built up over the years. Covering a wide range of issues starting in the eighteenth century, Darwinian Heresies brings us through the time of Charles Darwin and the Origin, and then through the twentieth century to the present. It is suggested that Darwin's true roots lie in Germany, not his native England, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. The beautiful skulls of Schiller and the Georgian girl : quantitative and aesthetic scaling of the races, 1750-1850.Robert J. Richards - 2018 - In Nicolaas A. Rupke & Gerhard Lauer (eds.), Johann Friedrich Blumenbach: race and natural history, 1750-1850. New York, NY: Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  27
    Rhapsodies on a Cat-Piano, or Johann Christian Reil and the Foundations of Romantic Psychiatry.Robert J. Richards - 1998 - Critical Inquiry 24 (3):700-736.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  38
    Ernst Haeckel and the Struggles over Evolution and Religion.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    If religion means a commitment to a set of theological propositions regarding the nature of God, the soul, and an afterlife, Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919) was never a religious enthusiast. The influence of the great religious thinker Friedrich Daniel Schleiermacher (1768-1834) on his family kept religious observance decorous and commitment vague.2 The theologian had maintained that true religion lay deep in the heart, where the inner person experienced a feeling of absolute dependence. Dogmatic tenets, he argued, served merely as inadequate symbols (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  4
    A Defense of Evolutionary Ethics.Robert J. Richards - 2009 - In Michael Ruse (ed.), Philosophy After Darwin: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Princeton University Press. pp. 388-410.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  6
    Origin’s Chapter III: The Two Faces of Natural Selection.Robert J. Richards - 2023 - In Maria Elice Brzezinski Prestes (ed.), Understanding Evolution in Darwin's “Origin”: The Emerging Context of Evolutionary Thinking. Springer. pp. 237-244.
    Chapter III contains several puzzles and unexpected features. The first puzzle regards the chapter’s relationship to Chapter IV: Natural Selection. Both chapters treat of natural selection, so what distinguishes them? Is it that Chapter IV indicates the intelligence behind nature’s selections and Chapter III introduces the analog of intelligence? And is it that Chapter III suggests that natural selection performs an eliminative function, while Chapter IV shows the positive impact of selection? In Chapter IV, and in many subsequent chapters, natural (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Ernst Haeckel’s Alleged Anti-Semitism and Contributions to Nazi Biology.Robert J. Richards - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):97-103.
    Ernst Haeckel’s popular book Nat¨urliche Sch¨opfungs- geschichte (Natural history of creation, 1868) represents human species in a hierarchy, from lowest (Papuan and Hottentot) to highest (Caucasian, including the Indo-German and Semitic races). His stem-tree (see Figure 1) of human descent and the racial theories that accompany it have been the focus of several recent books—histories arguing that Haeckel had a unique position in the rise of Nazi biology during the first part of the 20th century. In 1971, Daniel Gasman brought (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  7
    Was Hitler a Darwinian?: disputed questions in the history of evolutionary theory.Robert J. Richards - 2013 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    Darwin's theory of natural selection and its moral purpose -- Appendix 1: the logic of Darwin's long argument -- Appendix 2: the historical ontology and location of scientific theories -- Darwin's principle of divergence: why Fodor was almost right -- Darwin's romantic quest: mind, morals, and emotions -- Appendix: assessment of Darwin's moral theory -- The relation of Spencer's evolutionary theory to Darwin's -- Ernst Haeckel's scientific and artistic struggles -- Haeckel's embryos: fraud not proven -- The linguistic creation of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  18
    A History of Psychology: Main Currents in Psychological Thought. Thomas H. Leahey.Robert J. Richards - 1982 - Isis 73 (1):125-127.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  13
    An Intellectual History of PsychologyDaniel N. RobinsonThe Mind Unfolded: Essays on Psychology's Historic TextsDaniel N. Robinson.Robert J. Richards - 1980 - Isis 71 (2):325-326.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  18
    American Scientist.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    In 1914, James Leuba, a psychologist at Bryn Mawr, conducted several surveys of scientists and college students regarding their religious beliefs, publishing his findings in a 1916 book titled The Belief in God and Immortality. Among scientists generally, 41.8 percent indicated they were believers in a personal God (defined as a being to whom one could pray, expecting a response), whereas 41.5 percent expressed disbelief in such a God and 16.7 percent declared themselves to be agnostic. Among elite scientists (those (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  99
    Christian Wolff's Prolegomena to empirical and rational psychology: translation and commentary.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Though not the first to use the term "psychology" (psychologia), ' Christian Wolff did give it currency in the mid-eighteenth century. He was the first to mark off the discipline of empirical psychology and to distinguish it from rational, or theoretical, psychology. This distinction and his conception of the two corresponding methods of conducting psychological inquiry, especially his emphasis on the use of introspection, profoundly inffuenced the course of psychological..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Darwin’s place in the history of thought: A reevaluation.Robert J. Richards - 2009 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106 (Supplement 1):10056-10060.
    Scholars have usually given Darwin’s theory a neo-Darwinian interpretation. A more careful examination of the language of Darwin’s notebooks and the language of the Origin of Species indicates that he reconstructed nature with a definite purpose: the final goal of man as a moral creature. In the aftermath of the Origin, Darwin, however, became more circumspect.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  17
    Die Umweltlehre Jakob von Uexkulls in ihrer Bedeutung fur die Entwicklung der vergleichenden Verhaltenesforschung. Jutta Schmidt.Robert J. Richards - 1982 - Isis 73 (3):474-475.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  11
    Eloge: Susan Elizabeth Abrams, 27 July 1945–29 June 2003.Robert J. Richards - 2004 - Isis 95 (3):453-454.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  9
    Goethe's Use of Kant in the Erotics of Nature.Robert J. Richards - 2007 - In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Understanding purpose: Kant and the philosophy of biology. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press. pp. 8--137.
  43.  26
    Historiography and the Cultural Study of Nineteenth-Century Biology.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Historians, the good ones, mark a century by intellectual and social boundaries rather than by the turn of the calendar page. Only through fortuitous accident might occasions of consequence occur at the very beginning of a century. Imaginative historians do tend, however, to invest a date like 1800 with powers that attract events of significance. It is thus both fortunate and condign that Abiology@ came to linguistic and conceptual birth with the new century. Precisely in 1800, Karl Friedrich Burdach, a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Haeckel’s embryos: fraud not proven.Robert J. Richards - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (1):147-154.
    Through the last half of the nineteenth century and the first part of the twentieth, no scientist more vigorously defended Darwinian theory than the German Ernst Haeckel (1834–1919). More people learned of the new ideas through his voluminous publications, translated into numerous languages, than through any other source, including Darwin’s own writings. He enraged many of his contemporaries, especially among the religiously orthodox; and the enmity between evolutionary theory and religious fundamentalism that still burns brightly today may in large measure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  74
    Ideology and the history of science.Robert J. Richards - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (1):103-108.
    discipline a general science of our "intellectual faculties, their principal phenomena, and the more remarkable circumstances of their activities" (1801, p. 4). Convinced of the sensationalist epistemology of Locke and Condillac, Destutt de Tracy believed one could resolve all ideas into the sensations that produced them and thereby test their soundness. The sensationalist assumptions of his project led him to propose that "ideology is a part of zoology" (1801, p. 1), and he consequently paid close attention to the way physiological..
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  8
    Is Science Sexist? And Other Problems in the Biomedical Sciences. Michael Ruse.Robert J. Richards - 1983 - Isis 74 (3):422-423.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  34
    In the history of science.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    Though Darwin had formulated his theory of evolution by natural selection by early fall of 1837, he did not publish it until 1859 in the Origin ofSpecies. Darwin thus delayed publicly revealing his theory for some twenty years, Why did he wait so long'? Initially this may not seem an important or interesting question, but many historians have so regarded it, They have developed a variety of historiographically different explanations. This essay considers these several explanations, though with a larger purpose (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  12
    Materialism and natural events in Dewey's developing thought.Robert J. Richards - 1972 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (1):55-69.
  49.  54
    Nature is the Poetry of Mind, or How Schelling Solved Goethe's Kantian Problems.Robert J. Richards - unknown
    In 1853, two decades after Goethe’s death, Hermann von Helmholtz, who had just become professor of anatomy at Königsberg, delivered an evaluation of the poet=s contributions to science.1 The young Helmholtz lamented Goethe=s stubborn rejection of Newton =s prism experiments. Goethe=s theory of light and color simply broke on the rocks of his poetic genius. The tragedy, though, was not repeated in biological science. In Helmholtz=s estimation, Goethe had advanced in this area two singular and “uncommonly fruitful” ideas.2 The poet (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Substantive and Methodological Teleology in Aristotle and Some Logical Empiricists.Robert J. Richards - 1973 - The Thomist 37 (4):702.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 65