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Robert Kirk [90]Robert E. Kirk [8]Robert G. W. Kirk [6]
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  1.  17
    Making It Explicit: Reasoning, Representing, and Discursive Commitment.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):238-241.
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  2.  21
    Consciousness Reconsidered.Raw Feeling: A Philosophical Account of the Essence of Consciousness.Owen Flanagan & Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):417-421.
  3. Zombies and Consciousness.Robert Kirk (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    By definition zombies would be physically and behaviourally just like us, but not conscious. This currently very influential idea is a threat to all forms of physicalism, and has led some philosophers to give up physicalism and become dualists. It has also beguiled many physicalists, who feel forced to defend increasingly convoluted explanations of why the conceivability of zombies is compatible with their impossibility. Robert Kirk argues that the zombie idea depends on an incoherent view of the nature of phenomenal (...)
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  4.  40
    Being Well Together? Promoting Health and Well-Being Through More Than Human Collaboration and Companionship.Robert G. W. Kirk, Neil Pemberton & Tom Quick - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (1):75-81.
    Being well together, an inaugural Research Forum, will critically examine the myriad ways humans have formed partnerships with non-human species to improve health across time and place. Across the humanities and social sciences, a growing body of scholarship has begun to rethink the prominence of the ‘human’ in our accounts of the world by exploring the category less as an individualised essence and more as a temporal process of becoming. From this perspective, being human becomes a process of ‘becoming with’, (...)
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  5.  11
    Physicalism: The Philosophical Foundations.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):92.
    How should we conceive of physicalism? Does it have to involve more than some kind of supervenience, or must it be reductionist or even eliminativist? Does it commit you to the psychophysical identity theory? Does it entail that all events are explicable in terms of physics? And what is to count as the physical—indeed, what is to count as physics? Jeffrey Poland offers well-argued answers to several of these questions, and a solidly constructed framework in terms of which we may (...)
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  6. Raw Feeling: A Philosophical Account of the Essence of Consciousness.Robert Kirk - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Robert Kirk uses the notion of "raw feeling" to bridge the intelligibility gap between our knowledge of ourselves as physical organisms and our knowledge of ..
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  7.  38
    Consciousness and Concepts.Robert Kirk - 1992 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 66 (66):23-40.
  8.  18
    Zombies V. Materialists.Robert Kirk & J. E. R. Squires - 1974 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 48 (1):135-164.
  9. Zombies.Robert Kirk - 2003 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10.  28
    Raw Feeling.Joseph Levine & Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):94.
    Kirk’s aim in this book is to bridge what he calls “the intelligibility gap,” expressed in the question, “How could complex patterns of neural firing amount to this?”. He defends a position that he describes as “broadly functionalist,” which consists of several theses. I will briefly review them.
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  11.  13
    Consciousness and Concepts.Robert Kirk & Peter Carruthers - 1992 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 66 (1):23-60.
  12.  30
    Working across species down on the farm: Howard S. Liddell and the development of comparative psychopathology, c. 1923–1962.Robert G. W. Kirk & Edmund Ramsden - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):24.
    Seeking a scientific basis for understanding and treating mental illness, and inspired by the work of Ivan Pavlov, American physiologists, psychiatrists and psychologists in the 1920s turned to nonhuman animals. This paper examines how new constructs such as “experimental neurosis” emerged as tools to enable psychiatric comparison across species. From 1923 to 1962, the Cornell “Behavior Farm” was a leading interdisciplinary research center pioneering novel techniques to experimentally study nonhuman psychopathology. Led by the psychobiologist Howard Liddell, work at the Behavior (...)
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  13. Physicalism and Strict Implication.Robert Kirk - 2006 - Synthese 151 (3):523-536.
    Suppose P is the conjunction of all truths statable in the austere vocabulary of an ideal physics. Then phsicalists are likely to accept that any truths not included in P are different ways of talking about the reality specified by P. This ‘redescription thesis’ can be made clearer by means of the ‘strict implication thesis’, according to which inconsistency or incoherence are involved in denying the implication from P to interesting truths not included in it, such as truths about phenomenal (...)
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  14. Zombies Vs Materialists.Robert Kirk - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 48:135-52.
  15. Sentience and Behaviour.Robert Kirk - 1974 - Mind 83 (January):43-60.
  16.  33
    'Wanted—Standard Guinea Pigs': Standardisation and the Experimental Animal Market in Britain Ca. 1919–1947.Robert G. W. Kirk - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):280-291.
    In 1942 a coalition of twenty scientific societies formed the Conference on the Supply of Experimental Animals in an attempt to pressure the Medical Research Council to accept responsibility for the provision of standardised experimental animals in Britain. The practice of animal experimentation was subject to State regulation under the Cruelty to Animals Act of 1876, but no provision existed for the provision of animals for experimental use. Consequently, day-to-day laboratory work was reliant on a commercial small animal market which (...)
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  17.  23
    The Conceptual Link From Physical to Mental.Robert Kirk - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    How are truths about physical and mental states related? Robert Kirk articulates and defends 'redescriptive physicalism'--a fresh approach to the connection between the physical and the mental, which answers the problems that mental causation has traditionally raised for other non-reductive views.
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  18. Zombies V. Materialists.Robert Kirk & Roger Squires - 1974 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 48:135-163.
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  19.  85
    Strict Implication, Supervenience, and Physicalism.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (2):244-57.
  20. Indeterminacy of Translation.Robert Kirk - 2004 - In Roger F. Gibson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Quine. Cambridge University Press. pp. 151--180.
  21.  9
    Quine: Language, Experience and Reality.Robert Kirk & Christopher Hookway - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):479.
  22.  18
    A Brave New Animal For A Brave New World: The British Laboratory Animals Bureau And The Constitution Of International Standards Of Laboratory Animal Production And Use, Circa 1947–1968.Robert Kirk - 2010 - Isis 101:62-94.
  23.  27
    Problems in Philosophy: The Limits of Inquiry.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (182):117-119.
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  24. The Inconceivability of Zombies.Robert Kirk - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 139 (1):73-89.
    If zombies were conceivable in the sense relevant to the ‘conceivability argument’ against physicalism, a certain epiphenomenalistic conception of consciousness—the ‘e-qualia story’—would also be conceivable. But the e-qualia story is not conceivable because it involves a contradiction. The non-physical ‘e-qualia’ supposedly involved could not perform cognitive processing, which would therefore have to be performed by physical processes; and these could not put anyone into ‘epistemic contact’ with e-qualia, contrary to the e-qualia story. Interactionism does not enable zombists to escape these (...)
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  25.  53
    Nonreductive Physicalism and Strict Implication.Robert Kirk - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):544-552.
    I have argued that a strong kind of physicalism based on the strict implication thesis can consistently reject both eliminativism and reductionism (in any nontrivial sense). This piece defends that position against objections from Andrew Melnyk, who claims that either my formulation doesn't entail physicalism, or it must be interpreted in such a way that the mental is after all reducible to the physical. His alternatives depend on two interesting assumptions. I argue that both are mistaken, thereby, making this kind (...)
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  26.  30
    Translation Determined.Robert Kirk - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):447-449.
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  27.  91
    The Inaugural Address: Why There Couldn't Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):1–16.
    Philosophical zombies are exactly as physicalists suppose we are, right down to the tiniest details, but they have no conscious experiences. Are such things even logically possible? My aim is to contribute to showing not only that the answer is 'No', but why. My strategy has two prongs: a fairly brisk argument which demolishes the zombie idea; followed by an attempt to throw light on how something can qualify as a conscious perceiver. The argument to show that zombies are impossible (...)
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  28. Why Shouldn't We Be Able to Solve the Mind-Body Problem?Robert Kirk - 1991 - Analysis 51 (1):17-23.
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  29.  5
    ‘Wanted—Standard Guinea Pigs’: Standardisation and the Experimental Animal Market in Britain Ca. 1919–1947.Robert G. W. Kirk - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):280-291.
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  30.  11
    Why There Couldn’T Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):1-16.
  31.  8
    The Inaugural Address: Why There Couldn't Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 73:1-16.
    Philosophical zombies are exactly as physicalists suppose we are, right down to the tiniest details, but they have no conscious experiences. Are such things even logically possible? My aim is to contribute to showing not only that the answer is 'No', but why. My strategy has two prongs: a fairly brisk argument which demolishes the zombie idea; followed by an attempt to throw light on how something can qualify as a conscious perceiver. The argument to show that zombies are impossible (...)
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  32.  35
    Consciousness and the Limits of Objectivity: The Case for Subjective Physicalism, by Robert J. Howell: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. X + 190, £30.00. [REVIEW]Robert Kirk - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):794-797.
  33. How Physicalists Can Avoid Reductionism.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Synthese 108 (2):157-70.
    Kim maintains that a physicalist has only two genuine options, eliminativism and reductionism. But physicalists can reject both by using the Strict Implication thesis (SI). Discussing his arguments will help to show what useful work SI can do.(1) His discussion of anomalous monism depends on an unexamined assumption to the effect that SI is false.
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  34.  41
    Relativism and Reality: A Contemporary Introduction.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Routledge.
    Our thoughts about the world are clearly influenced by such things as point of view, temperament, past experience and culture. However, some thinkers go much further and argue that everything that exists depends on us, arguing that 'even reality is relative'. Can we accept such a claim in the face of events such as floods and other natural disasters or events seemingly beyond our control? 'Realists' argue that reality is independent of out thinking. 'Relativists' disagree, arguing that what there is (...)
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  35.  75
    Relativism and Reality: A Contemporary Introduction; Scientific Realism: How Science Tracks Truth.Gerald Doppelt, Robert Kirk & Stathis Psillos - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):142.
    These books make significant contributions to contemporary realism. Psillos’s book presents an excellent overview of the central components of current scientific realism, the main challenges to it, and the most promising strategies for defending it. It is a work of remarkable clarity, synthesis, and argumentative rigor. Psillos’s realism is committed to three claims: Scientific theories make irreducible assertions about unobservable entities which are literally true or false ; In the case of mature, successful theories, their success provides good reason for (...)
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  36.  70
    Why There Couldn't Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (8):1-16.
  37.  55
    Mind and Body.Robert Kirk - 2003 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Mind and Body Robert Kirk offers an introduction to the complex tangle of questions and puzzles roughly labelled the mind-body problem.
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  38.  2
    The Inaugural Address: Why There Couldn’T Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (1):1-16.
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  39. Consciousness and Concepts.Robert Kirk & Peter Carruthers - 1992 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 66:23-59.
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  40.  14
    A Result on Propositional Logics Having the Disjunction Property.Robert E. Kirk - 1982 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 23 (1):71-74.
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  41. Reply to Don Locke on Zombies and Materialism.Robert Kirk - 1977 - Mind 86 (April):262-4.
  42.  89
    Zapping the Zombies.Robert Kirk - 2006 - Think 5 (13):47-58.
    In the philosophy of mind, zombies often make an appearance. It seems we can conceive of zombies — beings physically exactly like ourselves but lacking conscious experience. There may not actually be any zombies, of course. But the suggestion that they could exist does at least seem to make sense. Or does it? Robert Kirk investigates.
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  43.  33
    Physicalism Lives.Robert Kirk - 1996 - Ratio 9 (1):85-89.
  44.  6
    A Brave New Animal for a Brave New World: The British Laboratory Animals Bureau and the Constitution of International Standards of Laboratory Animal Production and Use, Circa 1947–1968.Robert G. W. Kirk - 2010 - Isis 101 (1):62-94.
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  45.  29
    Why There Couldn't Be Zombies.Robert Kirk - 1999 - The Philosophers' Magazine 8:27-28.
  46.  31
    Goodbye to Transposed Qualia.Robert Kirk - 1981 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 82:33-44.
  47.  33
    From Physical Explicability to Full-Blooded Materialism.Robert Kirk - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (July):229-37.
  48.  94
    George Botterill and Peter Carruthers the Philosophy of Psychology.Robert Kirk - 2001 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):159-162.
  49. Zombies V. Materialists.Robert Kirk & Roger Squires - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 48:135-163.
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  50. Relativism and Reality: A Contemporary Introduction.Robert Kirk - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (201):552-553.
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