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Robert L. Frazier [9]Robert Lewis Frazier [1]
  1. Act Utilitarianism and Decision Procedures: Robert L. Frazier.Robert L. Frazier - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (1):43-53.
    A standard objection to act utilitarian theories is that they are not helpful in deciding what it is morally permissible for us to do when we actually have to make a choice between alternatives. That is, such theories are worthless as decision procedures. A standard reply to this objection is that act utilitarian theories can be evaluated solely as theories about right-making characteristics and, when so evaluated, their inadequacy as decision procedures is irrelevant. Even if somewhat unappealing, this is an (...)
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  2.  45
    Moral Relevance and Ceteris Paribus Principles.Robert L. Frazier - 1995 - Ratio 8 (2):113-125.
    My goal in this paper is twofold: to provide an account of what makes properties morally relevant, and to indicate the role such properties have in our moral thinking.
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  3.  22
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robert L. Frazier - 1996 - Mind 105 (420):720-722.
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  4.  9
    Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death.Robert L. Frazier - 1993 - Philosophical Books 34 (3):176-177.
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  5. Explanation, Control and Generality.Robert L. Frazier - unknown
    Among the divers factors that have encouraged and sustained scientific inquiry through its long history are two pervasive human concerns which provide, I think, the basic motivation for all scientific research. One of these is man's persistent desire to improve his strategic position in the world by means of dependable methods for predicting and, whenever possible, controlling the events that occur in it. The extent to which science has been able to satisfy this urge is reflected impressively in the vast (...)
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  6.  7
    Facing Evil.Robert L. Frazier - 1992 - Philosophical Books 33 (2):103-105.
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  7. Oxford Links: Oxford University Faculty of Philosophy Philosophy Library Philosophy Events Cycling Club.Robert L. Frazier - unknown
    To have a duty is, above all, to be subject to a binding, normative requirement. This means that unless there are exculpating reasons, someone who has a duty is required satisfy it, and can be justifiably criticized for not doing so. Having a duty to do something is like having been given a command to do it by someone who has a right to be obeyed: it must be done.
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  8.  12
    Roger Trigg's Rationality And Science. [REVIEW]Robert L. Frazier - 1996 - Philosophical Books 37 (4):282-284.
  9.  39
    Utilitarianism, Hedonism, and Desert: Essays in Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW]Robert L. Frazier - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (3):626-627.
    Our most basic moral intuition, according to Feldman, is simply stated: we ought to do the best we can. And, according to him, it is this intuition that underlies the utilitarian doctrine. However, Feldman thinks it is no easy task to develop a theory that adequately expresses this intuition. Indeed, he thinks that many philosophers “have vigorously defended ‘utilitarianism’ without succeeding in formulating the doctrine precisely”. He describes debating the merits of utilitarianism before it is adequately formulated as “Rambo philosophy”, (...)
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