9 found
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  1. Autonomy, Futility, and the Limits of Medicine.Robert L. Schwartz - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (2):159.
    Most of us find the surgeon's surprise at this patient' request understandable, and it is hard to imagine any surgeon acceding to this patient's demand. On the other hand, the patient is right—the surgeon is denying his technical skill because his values are different from those of the patient, whose values the surgeon does not respect. The autonomy of the patient is being limited by the values of the doctor whose own interests, other than his interest in practicing medicine according (...)
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  2.  9
    Funding the Costs of Disease Outbreaks Caused by Non‐Vaccination.Charlotte A. Moser, Dorit Reiss & Robert L. Schwartz - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):633-647.
    While vaccination rates in the United States are high — generally over 90 percent — rates of exemptions have been going up, and preventable diseases coming back. Aside from their human cost and the financial cost of treatment imposed on those who become ill, outbreaks impose financial costs on an already burdened public health system, diverting resources from other areas. This article examines the financial costs of non-vaccination, showing how high they can be and what they include. It makes a (...)
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  3.  36
    The Role of Institutional and Community Based Ethics Committees in the Debate on Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide.Robert L. Schwartz & Thomasine Kushner - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):121.
    In many countries the debate over the role that physicians may play in ending life has been limited to the judiciary and other law making institutions, professional medical organizations; and academics. Because of their multidisciplinary and diverse membership, ethics committees may be a particularly appropriate venue through which these discussions can be expanded to include a much larger community. In addition, ethics committees generally act in only advisory capacities because they do not actually make decisions, so they may provide a (...)
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  4.  25
    The Caduceus in Court: Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in The Netherlands.Robert L. Schwartz - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):111.
    As ethics committees become involved in discussing the propriety of euthanasia and assisted suicide, and as healthcare providers begin to seriously consider whether they might ever have a role in hastening the dying process, many have looked to The Netherlands as the only real example of a nation that permits euthanasia in limited circumstances. Unfortunately, partisans in the Dutch debate have often written about the Dutch experience as advocates rather than as neutral observers. Some have argued that euthanasia, which, they (...)
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  5.  29
    Multiculturalism, Medicine, and the Limits of Autonomy: The Practice of Female Circumcision.Robert L. Schwartz, David Johnson & Nan Burke - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):431.
    Television pictures of starvation and depredation are not the only way that famine and political instability in the horn of Africa have affected the United States. Many people from that region of the world are seeking political or economic refuge here, and they are exposing us to a culture that is in some ways — most notably, in the practice of female circumcision – so radically different from the prevailing American cultures that we have been stunned. They are also forcing (...)
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  6.  24
    Ethics Committees at Work: Physician Experience as a Measure of Competency: Implications for Informed Consent.Paul B. Hofmann, William Nelson, Neal Cohen & Robert L. Schwartz - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (3):458.
    The following description is based upon an actual case in which a patient initiated legal action after suffering a complication subsequent to an invasive diagnostic procedure performed by a senior fellow. Named as codefendants were the senior fellow, attending physician, and the hospital. Because any hospital with house staff is potentially vulnerable to similar litigation, Ethics Committees at Work is addressing the questions raised by this dilemma.
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  7.  21
    Rights of the Terminally Ill Act of the Australian Northern Territory.Robert L. Schwartz - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):157.
    Over the past year the debate over physician-assisted death has been waged in several courts and legislatures, and before at least one electorate as well. Measure 16, the Oregon Death With Dignity initiative that would permit physician-assisted suicide in some circumstances, was approved by the electorate; but it remains on hold while a permanent injunction issued against it by a Federal judge is reviewed by the United States Court of Appeals. Another Federal court judge's decision that the Washington statute criminalizing (...)
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  8.  16
    Making Patients Pay for Their Life-Style Choices.Robert L. Schwartz - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):393.
    Smokers impose a terrible cost on all of the rest of us. Those who choose to smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to suffer from cancer, heart disease, and a host of other diseases that require intensive and expensive medical intervention. Although they may suffer these diseases, we all pay for their habit through higher healthcare costs, which are reflected in higher insurance premiums, higher taxes, and fewer healthcare resources available for nonsmokers. It is simply unfair for smokers to impose (...)
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  9.  13
    Ethics Committees at Work.Robert L. Schwartz & Marcy Luedtke - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):270.