9 found
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  1. Human Social Evolution: A Comparison of Hunter-Gatherer and Chimpanzee Social Organization.Robert Layton & Sean O'Hara - 2010 - In Social Brain, Distributed Mind. pp. 83.
    This chapter compares the social behaviour of human hunter-gatherers with that of the better-studied chimpanzee species, Pan troglodytes, in an attempt to pinpoint the unique features of human social evolution. Although hunter-gatherers and chimpanzees living in central Africa have similar body weights, humans live at much lower population densities due to their greater dependence on predation. Human foraging parties have longer duration than those of chimpanzees, lasting hours rather than minutes, and a higher level of mutual dependence, through the division (...)
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  2.  3
    Kinship Without Words.Robert Layton - 2020 - Biological Theory 16 (3):135-147.
    This article seeks to identify at what point in hominid evolution language would have become adaptive. It starts by recalling the distinction between kin-selected altruism and reciprocal altruism, noting that the former is characteristic of social insects while the latter is found among some species of social mammal. Reciprocal altruism depends on the exchange of information assuring partners of the other’s continued friendly intent, as in the iterated prisoner’s dilemma. The article focuses on species that practice “fission–fusion”: social behaviour, where (...)
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  3. Is Culture a Commodity?Robert Layton & Gillian Wallace - 2006 - In Chris Scarre & Geoffrey Scarre (eds.), The Ethics of Archaeology: Philosophical Perspectives on Archaeological Practice. Cambridge University Press. pp. 46--68.
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    The Anthropology of Art.Graeme Chalmers & Robert Layton - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 18 (2):103.
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  5.  85
    An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology.Robert Layton - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this innovative introduction, Robert Layton reviews the ideas that have inspired anthropologists in their studies of societies around the world. An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology provides a clear and concise analysis of the theories, and traces the way in which they have been translated into anthropological debates. The opening chapter sets out the classical theoretical issues formulated by Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx and Durkheim. Successive chapters discuss Functionalism, Structuralism, Interactionist theories, and Marxist anthropology, while the final chapters address the (...)
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  6. Representing and Translating People's Place in the Landscape of Northern Australia.Robert Layton - 1997 - In Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.), After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge. pp. 34--122.
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  7.  1
    1. Scope and Method in Anthropology.Robert Layton - 2011 - In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 208.
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  8. Traditional and Contemporary Art of Aboriginal Australia.Robert Layton - 1994 - In Jeremy Coote (ed.), Anthropology, Art, and Aesthetics. Clarendon Press.
     
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  9.  7
    The Fate of “Culture”: Geertz and Beyond. Edited by Sherry B. Ortner. Pp. 169. (University of California Press, Berkeley, 1999.) $17.95, ISBN 0-520-21601-6, Paperback. [REVIEW]Robert Layton - 2003 - Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (1):153-160.
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