5 found
Order:
  1.  17
    Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences?Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Robert A. Pearlman & Holly Teetzel - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (1):28.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  2.  51
    Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences? A Second Look.Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Esther Rosenberg & Holly Teetzel - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):131-.
    Previous studies have documented the fallibility of attempts by surrogates and physicians to act in a substituted judgment capacity and predict end-of-life treatment decisions on behalf of patients. We previously reported that physicians misperceive their patients' preferences and substitute their own preferences for those of their patients with respect to four treatments: cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac arrest, ventilator for an indefinite period of time, medical nutrition and hydration for an indefinite period of time, and hospitalization in the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  9
    Do Physicians' Own Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatment Influence Their Perceptions of Patients' Preferences? A Second Look.Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Robert M. Kaplan, Esther Rosenberg & Holly Teetzel - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):131-137.
    Previous studies have documented the fallibility of attempts by surrogates and physicians to act in a substituted judgment capacity and predict end-of-life treatment decisions on behalf of patients. We previously reported that physicians misperceive their patients' preferences and substitute their own preferences for those of their patients with respect to four treatments: cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac arrest, ventilator for an indefinite period of time, medical nutrition and hydration for an indefinite period of time, and hospitalization in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  34
    Persistent Deprivation-Shift Effect Opposite in Direction to Incentive Contrast.Robert Eisenberger, Arlo K. Myers & Robert M. Kaplan - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):400-404.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  4
    Long-Term Physical Exercise and Mindfulness Practice in an Aging Population.Yi-Yuan Tang, Yaxin Fan, Qilin Lu, Li-Hai Tan, Rongxiang Tang, Robert M. Kaplan, Marco C. Pinho, Binu P. Thomas, Kewei Chen, Karl J. Friston & Eric M. Reiman - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark