Results for 'Robert M. Padilla'

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  1.  39
    Critical Periods After Stroke Study: Translating Animal Stroke Recovery Experiments Into a Clinical Trial.Alexander W. Dromerick, Matthew A. Edwardson, Dorothy F. Edwards, Margot L. Giannetti, Jessica Barth, Kathaleen P. Brady, Evan Chan, Ming T. Tan, Irfan Tamboli, Ruth Chia, Michael Orquiza, Robert M. Padilla, Amrita K. Cheema, Mark E. Mapstone, Massimo S. Fiandaca, Howard J. Federoff & Elissa L. Newport - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  2.  10
    Contextual Variability and Transfer of Discrimination.Frank A. Logan, Amado M. Padilla & Robert Boice - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (4p1):673.
  3. Mind, Brain and Adaptation in the Nineteenth Century.Robert M. Young & Nils Roll-Hansen - 1994 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
     
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  4. A Theory of Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1981
     
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  5.  91
    The Rationality of Emotion.Robert M. Gordon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):284.
    How should we understand the emotional rationality? This first part will explore two models of cognition and analogy strategies, test their intuition about the emotional desire. I distinguish between subjective and objective desire, then presents with a feeling from the "paradigm of drama" export semantics, here our emotional repertoire is acquired all the learned, and our emotions in the form of an object is fixed. It is pretty well in line with the general principles of rationality, especially the lowest reasonable (...)
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  6.  40
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 18-24.
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  7.  37
    Reply to Stich and Nichols.Robert M. Gordon - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):87-97.
  8.  8
    Controversies in defining death: a case for choice.Robert M. Veatch - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):381-401.
    When a new, brain-based definition of death was proposed fifty years ago, no one realized that the issue would remain unresolved for so long. Recently, six new controversies have added to the debate: whether there is a right to refuse apnea testing, which set of criteria should be chosen to measure the death of the brain, how the problem of erroneous testing should be handled, whether any of the current criteria sets accurately measures the death of the brain, whether standard (...)
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  9.  20
    The Divine Simplicity in St Thomas: ROBERT M. BURNS.Robert M. Burns - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (3):271-293.
    In the Summa Theologiae ‘simplicity’ is treated as pre–eminent among the terms which may properly be used to describe the divine nature. The Question in which Thomas demonstrates that God must be ‘totally and in every way simple’ immediately follows the five proofs of God's existence, preceding the treatment of His other perfections, and being frequently used as the basis for proving them. Then in Question 13 ‘univocal predication' is held to be ‘impossible between God and creatures’ so that at (...)
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  10.  63
    Abandoning Informed Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):5-12.
  11. Darwin's Metaphor: Nature's Place in Victorian Culture.Robert M. Young - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):131-132.
  12.  13
    Darwin's Metaphor Does Nature Select ?Robert M. Young - 1971 - Dept. Of Philosophy, San Jose College.
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  13.  8
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (4):18.
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  14.  64
    Human Understanding, Vol. I: The Collective Use and Evolution of Concepts.Robert M. Martin - 1973 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (3):441-442.
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  15.  33
    Hippocratic, Religious, and Secular Ethics: The Points of Conflict.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
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  16.  47
    The Impossibility of a Morality Internal to Medicine.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):621 – 642.
    After distinguishing two different meanings of the notion of a morality internal to medicine and considering a hypothetical case of a society that relied on its surgeons to eunuchize priest/cantors to permit them to play an important religious/cultural role, this paper examines three reasons why morality cannot be derived from reflection on the ends of the practice of medicine: (1) there exist many medical roles and these have different ends or purposes, (2) even within any given medical role, there exists (...)
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  17.  21
    Animal Psychology and Criteria of the Psychic.Robert M. Yerkes - 1905 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (6):141-149.
  18.  61
    Darwin’s Metaphor: Does Nature Select?Robert M. Young - 1971 - The Monist 55 (3):442-503.
    It is not too great an exaggeration to claim that On the Origin of Species was, along with Das Kapital, one of the two most significant works in the intellectual history of the nineteenth century. As George Henry Lewes wrote in 1868, ‘No work of our time has been so general in its influence’. However, the very generality of the influence of Darwin’s work provides the chief problem for the intellectual historian. Most books and articles on the subject assert the (...)
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  19.  20
    Models for Ethical Medicine in a Revolutionary Age.Robert M. Veatch - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (3):5-7.
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  20.  96
    Abandon the Dead Donor Rule or Change the Definition of Death?Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
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  21.  56
    Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients.Robert M. Veatch - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
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  22. Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
     
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  23.  93
    Why Liberals Should Accept Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):19-36.
    : Free-market libertarians have long supported incentives to increase organ procurement, but those oriented to justice traditionally have opposed them. This paper presents the reasons why those worried about justice should reconsider financial incentives and tolerate them as a lesser moral evil. After considering concerns about discrimination and coercion and setting them aside, it is suggested that the real moral concern should be manipulation of the neediest. The one offering the incentive (the government) has the resources to eliminate the basic (...)
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  24.  38
    Case Studies in Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
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  25. Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution: Our Last Quest for Responsibility.Robert M. VEATCH - 1976 - Yale University Press.
     
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  26.  46
    Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God.Robert M. Wallace - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book shows that the repeated announcements of the death of Hegel's philosophical system have been premature. Hegel's Philosophy of Freedom, Reality, and God brings to light accomplishments for which Hegel is seldom given credit: unique arguments for the reality of freedom, for the reality of knowledge, for the irrationality of egoism, and for the compatibility of key insights from traditional theism and naturalistic atheism. The book responds in a systematic manner to many of the major criticisms leveled at Hegel's (...)
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  27.  21
    Scholarship and the History of the Behavioural Sciences.Robert M. Young - 1966 - History of Science 5 (1):1-51.
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  28.  26
    Indifference of Subjects: An Alternative to Equipoise in Randomized Clinical Trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):295-323.
    The physician who upholds the Hippocratic oath is supposed to be loyal to his or her patients. This requires choosing only the therapy that the physician believes is best for the patient. However, knowing what is best requires randomized clinical trials. Thus, clinicians must be willing to recruit their patients to be assigned at random to one of two therapies in order to determine which is best based on the highest standards of pharmacological science.
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  29.  61
    The Irrelevance of Equipoise.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):167 – 183.
    It is commonly believed in research ethics that some form of equipoise is a necessary condition for justifying randomized clinical trials, that without it clinicians are violating the moral duty to do what is best for the patient. Recent criticisms have shown how complex the concept of equipoise is, but often retain the commitment to some form of equipoise for randomization to be justified. This article rejects that claim. It first asks for what one should be equally poised (scientific or (...)
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  30. Hegel’s Philosophy of Freedom. [REVIEW]Robert M. Wallace - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):606-608.
    This book provides a lucid commentary on Hegel’s Philosophy of Right and on Hegel’s other major writings on ethics and politics. Since it is the only commentary in English that covers the Philosophy of Right almost section by section, from start to finish, and it also carries on an instructive dialogue with many of the other commentaries published in recent years, it will be very useful to students and to scholars who aren’t specialists in Hegel. Although Franco can’t, of course, (...)
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  31.  41
    The Place of Care in Ethical Theory.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):210 – 224.
    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of (...)
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  32. Justice, the Basic Social Contract and Health Care.Robert M. Veatch - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
  33.  25
    The Dead Donor Rule: True by Definition.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):10 – 11.
  34.  25
    Implied, Presumed and Waived Consent: The Relative Moral Wrongs of Under- and Over-Informing.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):39 – 41.
  35.  22
    Resolving Conflicts Among Principles: Ranking, Balancing, and Specifying.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):199-218.
  36. Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A model for ethical problem solving -- Values in health and illness -- What is the source of moral judgments? -- Benefiting the patient and others : duty to do good and avoid harm -- Justice : allocation of health resources -- Autonomy -- Veracity : honesty with patients -- Fidelity : promise-keeping, loyalty to patients, and impaired professionals -- Avoidance of killing -- Abortion, sterilization, and contraception -- Genetics, birth, and the biological revolution -- Mental health and behavior control (...)
     
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  37.  10
    Would a Reasonable Person Now Accept the 1968 Harvard Brain Death Report? A Short History of Brain Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S6-S9.
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  38.  68
    Professional Medical Ethics: The Grounding of its Principles.Robert M. Veatch - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):1-19.
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  39.  12
    Autonomy's Temporary Triumph.Robert M. Veatch - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (5):38-40.
  40. Folk Psychology as Simulation.Robert M. Gordon - 1986 - Mind and Language 1 (2):158-71.
  41.  58
    Subject Indifference and the Justification of Placebo-Controlled Trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):12 – 13.
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  42.  8
    Advice and Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (1):20-22.
  43.  34
    Is There a Common Morality?Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):189-192.
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  44.  16
    Hospital Ethics Committees: Is There a Role?Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (3):22-25.
  45.  15
    Should Basic Care Get Priority?: Doubts About Rationing the Oregon Way.Robert M. Veatch - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (3):187-206.
  46.  26
    The Right of Subjects to See the Protocol.Robert M. Veatch - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  47.  18
    Bonus Allocation Points for Those Willing to Donate Organs.Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):1 – 3.
  48.  20
    Ethics Consultation: Permission From Patients and Other Problems of Method.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):43-45.
  49.  15
    Medical School Oath-Taking: The Moral Controversy.Robert M. Veatch & Cheryl C. Macpherson - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):335.
    Professions typically formulate codes of ethics. Medical students are exposed to various codes and often are expected to recite some.
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  50.  18
    From Forgoing Life Support to Aid-in-Dying.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S7.
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