151 found
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  1.  17
    Theory Medicl Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1983 - Basic Books.
    Assesses the ethical problems that doctors face every day and advocates a more universal code of medical ethics, one that draws on the traditions of religion and philosophy.
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  2.  59
    The impending collapse of the whole-brain definition of death.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the beginning and end of life: readings on personal identity and bioethics. Baltimore, Md: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 18-24.
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  3.  11
    The Basics of Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Routledge.
  4.  51
    Reconciling Lists of Principles in Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):540-559.
    In celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Beauchamp and Childress’s Principles of Biomedical Ethics, a review is undertaken to compare the lists of principles in various bioethical theories to determine the extent to which the various lists can be reconciled. Included are the single principle theories of utilitarianism, libertarianism, Hippocratism, and the theories of Pellegrino, Engelhardt, The Belmont Report, Beauchamp and Childress, Ross, Veatch, and Gert. We find theories all offering lists of principles numbering from one to (...)
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  5.  20
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (4):18.
    No one really believes that literally all functions of the entire brain must be lost for an individual to be dead. A better definition of death involves a higher brain orientation.
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  6.  80
    Abandoning Informed Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):5-12.
    Clinicians cannot obtain valid consent to treatment because they cannot guess which treatment option will serve a particular patient's best interests. These guesses could be made more accurately if patients were paired with providers who share their deep values.
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  7.  35
    Controversies in defining death: a case for choice.Robert M. Veatch - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):381-401.
    When a new, brain-based definition of death was proposed fifty years ago, no one realized that the issue would remain unresolved for so long. Recently, six new controversies have added to the debate: whether there is a right to refuse apnea testing, which set of criteria should be chosen to measure the death of the brain, how the problem of erroneous testing should be handled, whether any of the current criteria sets accurately measures the death of the brain, whether standard (...)
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  8.  28
    Models for Ethical Medicine in a Revolutionary Age.Robert M. Veatch - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (3):5-7.
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  9.  61
    The impossibility of a morality internal to medicine.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):621 – 642.
    After distinguishing two different meanings of the notion of a morality internal to medicine and considering a hypothetical case of a society that relied on its surgeons to eunuchize priest/cantors to permit them to play an important religious/cultural role, this paper examines three reasons why morality cannot be derived from reflection on the ends of the practice of medicine: (1) there exist many medical roles and these have different ends or purposes, (2) even within any given medical role, there exists (...)
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  10. The death of whole-brain death: The plague of the disaggregators, somaticists, and mentalists.Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):353 – 378.
    In its October 2001 issue, this journal published a series of articles questioning the Whole-Brain-based definition of death. Much of the concern focused on whether somatic integration - a commonly understood basis for the whole-brain death view - can survive the brain's death. The present article accepts that there are insurmountable problems with whole-brain death views, but challenges the assumption that loss of somatic integration is the proper basis for pronouncing death. It examines three major themes. First, it accepts the (...)
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  11.  18
    Killing by Organ Procurement: Brain-Based Death and Legal Fictions.Robert M. Veatch - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):289-311.
    The dead donor rule (DDR) governs procuring life-prolonging organs. They should be taken only from deceased donors. Miller and Truog have proposed abandoning the rule when patients have decided to forgo life-sustaining treatment and have consented to procurement. Organs could then be procured from living patients, thus killing them by organ procurement. This proposal warrants careful examination. They convincingly argue that current brain or circulatory death pronouncement misidentifies the biologically dead. After arguing convincingly that physicians already cause death by withdrawing (...)
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  12.  70
    Doctor does not know best: Why in the new century physicians must stop trying to benefit patients.Robert M. Veatch - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
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  13.  51
    Hippocratic, religious, and secular ethics: The points of conflict.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
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  14.  56
    Transplanting Hearts after Death Measured by Cardiac Criteria: The Challenge to the Dead Donor Rule.Robert M. Veatch - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):313-329.
    The current definition of death used for donation after cardiac death relies on a determination of the irreversible cessation of the cardiac function. Although this criterion can be compatible with transplantation of most organs, it is not compatible with heart transplantation since heart transplants by definition involve the resuscitation of the supposedly "irreversibly" stopped heart. Subsequently, the definition of "irreversible" has been altered so as to permit heart transplantation in some circumstances, but this is unsatisfactory. There are three available strategies (...)
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  15.  14
    Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution: Our Last Quest for Responsibility.Robert M. Veatch - 1976 - Yale University Press.
  16.  17
    Patient, heal thyself: how the new medicine puts the patient in charge.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
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  17. Abandon the dead donor rule or change the definition of death?Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
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  18.  49
    Case studies in medical ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
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  19.  6
    Disrupted dialogue: medical ethics and the collapse of physician-humanist communication (1770-1980).Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both fields were richer for it. (...)
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  20.  41
    Indifference of subjects: An alternative to equipoise in randomized clinical trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):295-323.
    The physician who upholds the Hippocratic oath is supposed to be loyal to his or her patients. This requires choosing only the therapy that the physician believes is best for the patient. However, knowing what is best requires randomized clinical trials. Thus, clinicians must be willing to recruit their patients to be assigned at random to one of two therapies in order to determine which is best based on the highest standards of pharmacological science.
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  21.  33
    Resolving Conflicts Among Principles: Ranking, Balancing, and Specifying.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):199-218.
    While much attention has been given to the use of principles in biomedical ethics and increasing attention is given to alternative theoretical approaches, relatively little attention has been devoted to the critical task of how one resolves conflicts among competing principles. After summarizing the system of principles and some problems in conceptualizing the principles, several strategies for reconciling conflicts among principles are examined including the use of single-principle theories (pure libertarianism, pure utilitarianism, and pure Hippocratism), balancing theories, conflicting appeals theories, (...)
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  22.  56
    The place of care in ethical theory.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):210 – 224.
    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of (...)
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  23.  26
    Ethical and Logistical Issues Raised by the Advanced Donation Program “Pay It Forward” Scheme.Lainie Friedman Ross, James R. Rodrigue & Robert M. Veatch - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (5):518-536.
    The advanced donation program was proposed in 2014 to allow an individual to donate a kidney in order to provide a voucher for a kidney in the future for a particular loved one. In this article, we explore the logistical and ethical issues that such a program raises. We argue that such a program is ethical in principle but there are many logistical issues that need to be addressed to ensure that the actual program is fair to both those who (...)
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  24.  82
    The irrelevance of equipoise.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):167 – 183.
    It is commonly believed in research ethics that some form of equipoise is a necessary condition for justifying randomized clinical trials, that without it clinicians are violating the moral duty to do what is best for the patient. Recent criticisms have shown how complex the concept of equipoise is, but often retain the commitment to some form of equipoise for randomization to be justified. This article rejects that claim. It first asks for what one should be equally poised (scientific or (...)
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  25. Why Liberals Should Accept Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):19-36.
    : Free-market libertarians have long supported incentives to increase organ procurement, but those oriented to justice traditionally have opposed them. This paper presents the reasons why those worried about justice should reconsider financial incentives and tolerate them as a lesser moral evil. After considering concerns about discrimination and coercion and setting them aside, it is suggested that the real moral concern should be manipulation of the neediest. The one offering the incentive (the government) has the resources to eliminate the basic (...)
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  26.  35
    The dead donor rule: True by definition.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):10 – 11.
  27.  32
    Implied, presumed and waived consent: The relative moral wrongs of under- and over-informing.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):39 – 41.
  28.  37
    Special Supplement: The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen, Shana Alexander, Judith P. Swazey, Warren T. Reich, Robert M. Veatch, Daniel Callahan, Tom L. Beauchamp, Stanley Hauerwas, K. Danner Clouser, David J. Rothman, Daniel M. Fox, Stanley J. Reiser & Arthur L. Caplan - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S1.
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  29. Justice, the basic social contract and health care.Robert M. Veatch - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
  30.  8
    Generalization of Expertise.Robert M. Veatch - 1973 - The Hastings Center Studies 1 (2):29.
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  31.  10
    Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1989 - Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
    Twelve contributors discuss critical issues affecting medical ethics. Topics include: the normative principles of medical ethics, concepts of health and disease, the physician-patient relationship, human experimentation, informed consent, genetics, ethical issues in organ transplantation, and moral.
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  32.  19
    Would a Reasonable Person Now Accept the 1968 Harvard Brain Death Report? A Short History of Brain Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):6-9.
    When The Ad Hoc Committee of Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death began meeting in 1967, I was a graduate student, with committee member Ralph Potter and committee chair Henry Beecher as my mentors. The question of when to stop life support on a severely compromised patient was not clearly differentiated from the question of when someone was dead. A serious clinical problem arose when physicians realized that a patient's condition was hopeless but life support perpetuated (...)
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  33.  16
    The Foundations of Justice: Why the Retarded and the Rest of Us Have Claims to Equality.Stephen Potts & Robert M. Veatch - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (5):41.
    The Foundations of Justice: Why the Retarded and the Rest of Us Have Claims to Equality. By Robert M. Veatch.
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  34.  13
    Advice and Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (1):20-22.
  35.  31
    Bonus allocation points for those willing to donate organs.Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):1 – 3.
  36.  20
    Justice and the Economics of Terminal Illness.Robert M. Veatch - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (4):34-40.
    Our society is increasingly confronting the questions of whether health care can and should be limited on economic considerations. While it is tempting to use utilitarian‐based, cost‐benefit analysis in such decisions, only principles of procedural and substantive justice can provide solid moral grounds for using economic criteria to set limits on care. An ethic of justice can inform the development of guidelines for health planners in policies to limit care for the terminally ill and the nonterminal elderly.
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  37.  21
    Should Basic Care Get Priority?: Doubts About Rationing the Oregon Way.Robert M. Veatch - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (3):187-206.
    Recognition of the need to ration care has focused attention on the concept of "basic care." It is often thought that care that is "basic" is also morally prior. This article questions that premise in light of the usual definitions of "basic." Specifically, it argues that Oregon's rationing scheme, which defines "basic" in terms of cost-effective care, fails to pay sufficient attention to important ethical principles such as justice.
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  38.  20
    Autonomy's Temporary Triumph.Robert M. Veatch - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (5):38-40.
  39.  29
    Ethics Consultation: Permission from Patients and Other Problems of Method.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):43-45.
  40.  21
    From forgoing life support to aid-in-dying.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S7.
  41.  23
    Hospital Ethics Committees: Is There a Role?Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (3):22-25.
  42.  42
    Is There a Common Morality?Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):189-192.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13.3 (2003) 189-192 [Access article in PDF] Is There a Common Morality? Robert M. VeatchSenior EditorOne of the most exciting and important developments in recent ethical theory—especially bioethical theory—is the emergence of the concept of "common morality." Some of the most influential theories in bioethics have endorsed the notion using it as the starting point of their systems. This issue of the Journal is (...)
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  43.  73
    Professional medical ethics: The grounding of its principles.Robert M. Veatch - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):1-19.
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  44.  13
    Human experimentation committees: professional or representative?Robert M. Veatch - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (5):31-40.
  45.  12
    Nursing Ethics, Physician Ethics, and Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1981 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (6):17-19.
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  46.  11
    Nursing Ethics, Physician Ethics, and Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1981 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (6):17-19.
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  47.  23
    Medical school oath-taking: the moral controversy.Robert M. Veatch & Cheryl C. Macpherson - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):335.
    Professions typically formulate codes of ethics. Medical students are exposed to various codes and often are expected to recite some.
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  48.  14
    Bioethics and Democracy: Competing Roles of National Bioethics Organisations.Susan Dodds, Colin Thomson, Robert M. Veatch, Arthur Caplan, Autumn Fiester, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Ana Smith Iltis, Fabrice Jotterand, Wenmay Rei & Jiunn-Rong Yeh - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (6):326-338.
    ABSTRACT In establishing National Bioethics Organisations (NBOs), liberal democracies seek to acknowledge the diversity of strongly held ethical positions and the imperative to engage in public debate about important bioethical decisions. NBOs are typically given a range of responsibilities, including contributing to and stimulating public debate; providing expert opinion on relevant issues for policy deliberations; and developing public policy. The state is now found to have an interest in areas previously thought to be a matter of individual choice. NBOs can (...)
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  49.  91
    Case studies in biomedical ethics: decision-making, principles, and cases.Robert M. Veatch - 2010 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Amy Marie Haddad & Dan C. English.
    A model for ethical problem solving -- Values in health and illness -- What is the source of moral judgments? -- Benefiting the patient and others : duty to do good and avoid harm -- Justice : allocation of health resources -- Autonomy -- Veracity : honesty with patients -- Fidelity : promise-keeping, loyalty to patients, and impaired professionals -- Avoidance of killing -- Abortion, sterilization, and contraception -- Genetics, birth, and the biological revolution -- Mental health and behavior control (...)
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  50.  47
    Should Institutions Disclose the Names of Employees with Covid‐19?Daniel P. Sulmasy & Robert M. Veatch - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):25-27.
    Prestigious University is a large, private educational institution with a medical school, a university hospital, a law school, and graduate and undergraduate colleges all on a single campus. In the face of the Covid‐19 pandemic, students were told during spring break to return to campus only briefly to retrieve their belongings. Classes then went online. On March 23, 2020, the faculty, students, and staff were emailed the following by the university's director of infection control and public health: We have become (...)
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