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  1. A Theory of Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1981
     
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  2.  41
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 18-24.
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  3.  10
    Controversies in defining death: a case for choice.Robert M. Veatch - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):381-401.
    When a new, brain-based definition of death was proposed fifty years ago, no one realized that the issue would remain unresolved for so long. Recently, six new controversies have added to the debate: whether there is a right to refuse apnea testing, which set of criteria should be chosen to measure the death of the brain, how the problem of erroneous testing should be handled, whether any of the current criteria sets accurately measures the death of the brain, whether standard (...)
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  4.  64
    Abandoning Informed Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):5-12.
  5.  8
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (4):18.
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  6.  33
    Hippocratic, Religious, and Secular Ethics: The Points of Conflict.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
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  7.  47
    The Impossibility of a Morality Internal to Medicine.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):621 – 642.
    After distinguishing two different meanings of the notion of a morality internal to medicine and considering a hypothetical case of a society that relied on its surgeons to eunuchize priest/cantors to permit them to play an important religious/cultural role, this paper examines three reasons why morality cannot be derived from reflection on the ends of the practice of medicine: (1) there exist many medical roles and these have different ends or purposes, (2) even within any given medical role, there exists (...)
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  8.  21
    Models for Ethical Medicine in a Revolutionary Age.Robert M. Veatch - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (3):5-7.
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  9. Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
     
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  10.  57
    Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients.Robert M. Veatch - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
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  11.  96
    Abandon the Dead Donor Rule or Change the Definition of Death?Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
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  12.  11
    Ethical and Logistical Issues Raised by the Advanced Donation Program “Pay It Forward” Scheme.Lainie Friedman Ross, James R. Rodrigue & Robert M. Veatch - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (5):518-536.
    The advanced donation program was proposed in 2014 to allow an individual to donate a kidney in order to provide a voucher for a kidney in the future for a particular loved one. In this article, we explore the logistical and ethical issues that such a program raises. We argue that such a program is ethical in principle but there are many logistical issues that need to be addressed to ensure that the actual program is fair to both those who (...)
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  13.  93
    Why Liberals Should Accept Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):19-36.
    : Free-market libertarians have long supported incentives to increase organ procurement, but those oriented to justice traditionally have opposed them. This paper presents the reasons why those worried about justice should reconsider financial incentives and tolerate them as a lesser moral evil. After considering concerns about discrimination and coercion and setting them aside, it is suggested that the real moral concern should be manipulation of the neediest. The one offering the incentive (the government) has the resources to eliminate the basic (...)
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  14.  4
    Reconciling Lists of Principles in Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):540-559.
    In celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Beauchamp and Childress’s Principles of Biomedical Ethics, a review is undertaken to compare the lists of principles in various bioethical theories to determine the extent to which the various lists can be reconciled. Included are the single principle theories of utilitarianism, libertarianism, Hippocratism, and the theories of Pellegrino, Engelhardt, The Belmont Report, Beauchamp and Childress, Ross, Veatch, and Gert. We find theories all offering lists of principles numbering from one to (...)
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  15.  38
    Case Studies in Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
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  16. Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution: Our Last Quest for Responsibility.Robert M. VEATCH - 1976 - Yale University Press.
     
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  17.  62
    The Irrelevance of Equipoise.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):167 – 183.
    It is commonly believed in research ethics that some form of equipoise is a necessary condition for justifying randomized clinical trials, that without it clinicians are violating the moral duty to do what is best for the patient. Recent criticisms have shown how complex the concept of equipoise is, but often retain the commitment to some form of equipoise for randomization to be justified. This article rejects that claim. It first asks for what one should be equally poised (scientific or (...)
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  18.  26
    Indifference of Subjects: An Alternative to Equipoise in Randomized Clinical Trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):295-323.
    The physician who upholds the Hippocratic oath is supposed to be loyal to his or her patients. This requires choosing only the therapy that the physician believes is best for the patient. However, knowing what is best requires randomized clinical trials. Thus, clinicians must be willing to recruit their patients to be assigned at random to one of two therapies in order to determine which is best based on the highest standards of pharmacological science.
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  19.  43
    The Place of Care in Ethical Theory.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):210 – 224.
    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of (...)
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  20. Justice, the Basic Social Contract and Health Care.Robert M. Veatch - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
  21.  26
    Implied, Presumed and Waived Consent: The Relative Moral Wrongs of Under- and Over-Informing.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):39 – 41.
  22.  25
    The Dead Donor Rule: True by Definition.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):10 – 11.
  23.  22
    Resolving Conflicts Among Principles: Ranking, Balancing, and Specifying.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):199-218.
  24.  13
    Special Supplement: The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen, Shana Alexander, Judith P. Swazey, Warren T. Reich, Robert M. Veatch, Daniel Callahan, Tom L. Beauchamp, Stanley Hauerwas, K. Danner Clouser, David J. Rothman, Daniel M. Fox, Stanley J. Reiser & Arthur L. Caplan - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S1.
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  25.  68
    Professional Medical Ethics: The Grounding of its Principles.Robert M. Veatch - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):1-19.
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  26. Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    A model for ethical problem solving -- Values in health and illness -- What is the source of moral judgments? -- Benefiting the patient and others : duty to do good and avoid harm -- Justice : allocation of health resources -- Autonomy -- Veracity : honesty with patients -- Fidelity : promise-keeping, loyalty to patients, and impaired professionals -- Avoidance of killing -- Abortion, sterilization, and contraception -- Genetics, birth, and the biological revolution -- Mental health and behavior control (...)
     
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  27.  11
    Would a Reasonable Person Now Accept the 1968 Harvard Brain Death Report? A Short History of Brain Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S6-S9.
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  28.  12
    Autonomy's Temporary Triumph.Robert M. Veatch - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (5):38-40.
  29.  58
    Subject Indifference and the Justification of Placebo-Controlled Trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):12 – 13.
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  30.  35
    Is There a Common Morality?Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):189-192.
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  31.  8
    Advice and Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (1):20-22.
  32.  16
    Hospital Ethics Committees: Is There a Role?Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (3):22-25.
  33.  15
    Should Basic Care Get Priority?: Doubts About Rationing the Oregon Way.Robert M. Veatch - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (3):187-206.
  34.  22
    Ethics Consultation: Permission From Patients and Other Problems of Method.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):43-45.
  35.  18
    Bonus Allocation Points for Those Willing to Donate Organs.Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):1 – 3.
  36.  15
    Medical School Oath-Taking: The Moral Controversy.Robert M. Veatch & Cheryl C. Macpherson - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):335.
    Professions typically formulate codes of ethics. Medical students are exposed to various codes and often are expected to recite some.
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  37.  18
    From Forgoing Life Support to Aid-in-Dying.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S7.
  38.  15
    Justice and the Economics of Terminal Illness.Robert M. Veatch - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (4):34-40.
  39.  77
    The Internal Morality of Medicine: An Introduction.Robert M. Veatch & Franklin G. Miller - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):555 – 557.
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  40.  2
    Are Organ Donors Really Dead: The Near-Irrelevance of Autoresuscitation.Robert M. Veatch - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (8):1-2.
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  41.  10
    DRGs and the Ethical Reallocation of Resources.Robert M. Veatch - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (3):32-40.
    To allocate resources ethically under DRGs, we need an expanded medical ethics. Appealing to traditional patient-centred principles such as beneficence and autonomy will not be sufficient. We also need to take into account the social principles of full beneficence and justice. If marginal benefits must be eliminated, clinicians should not participate in deciding who should get less care but should remain committed to their patients' interests.
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  42.  5
    Human Experimentation Committees: Professional or Representative?Robert M. Veatch - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (5):31-40.
  43.  41
    Consensus of Expertise: The Role of Consensus of Experts in Formulating Public Policy and Estimating Facts.Robert M. Veatch - 1991 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (4):427-445.
    For years analysts have recognized the error of assuming that experts in medical science are also experts in deciding the clinically correct course for patients. This paper extends the analysis of the use of the consensus of experts to their use in public policy groups such as NIH Consensus Development panels. After arguing that technical experts cannot be expected to be expert on public policy decisions, the author extends the criticism to the use of the consensus of experts in estimating (...)
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  44.  60
    Egalitarian and Maximin Theories of Justice: Directed Donation of Organs for Transplant.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):456 – 476.
    It is common to interpret Rawls's maximin theory of justice as egalitarian. Compared to utilitarian theories, this may be true. However, in special cases practices that distribute resources so as to benefit the worst off actually increase the inequality between the worst off and some who are better off. In these cases the Rawlsian maximin parts company with what is here called true egalitarianism. A policy question requiring a distinction between maximin and "true egalitarian" allocations has arisen in the arena (...)
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  45.  10
    Which Grounds for Overriding Autonomy Are Legitimate?Robert M. Veatch - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (6):42-43.
  46.  27
    Justice in Health Care: The Contribution of Edmund Pellegrino.Robert M. Veatch - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (3):269-287.
    Edmund Pellegrino has pioneered work in medical ethics calling for a reconstruction of Hippocratic ethics. In particular, he has spoken of incorporating principles that concern justice and the common good. This article traces his commitment to the common good, concern for the poor, opposition to libertarianism, acknowledgement of the necessity of rationing, and reluctance to give clinicians social allocational tasks. It asks how Pellegrino relates distributive justice to the common good. Drawing on his theory relating autonomy to patient-centered beneficence (in (...)
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  47.  26
    The Foundations of Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (3-4):206-217.
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  48.  15
    Forgoing Life-Sustaining Treatment: Limits to the Consensus.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (1):1-19.
  49.  12
    The Technical Criteria Fallacy.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Hastings Center Report 7 (4):15-16.
  50.  72
    Just Social Institutions and the Right to Health Care.Robert M. Veatch - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):170-173.