102 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Robert S. Brumbaugh [90]Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh [12]
  1. Dewey, Russell, Whitehead: Philosophers as Educators.Brian Patrick Hendley, George Kimball Plochmann & Robert S. Brumbaugh - 2010 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    In _Philosophers as Educators_ Brian Patrick Hendley argues that philosophers of edu­cation should reject their preoccupation with defining terms and analyzing concepts and embrace the philosophical task of con­structing general theories of education. Hendley discusses in detail the educational philosophies of John Dewey, Bertrand Rus­sell, and Alfred North Whitehead. He sees in these men excellent role models that contem­porary philosophers might well follow. Hendley believes that, like these men­tors, philosophers should take a more ac­tive, practical role in education. Dewey and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  44
    Education and Reality: Two Revolutions.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1973 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 48 (1):5-18.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  17
    Platonic Studies of Greek Philosophy: Form, Arts, Gadgets, and Hemlock.Robert S. BRUMBAUGH - 1989 - State University of New York Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. Plato's Ideal Curriculum and Contemporary Philosophy of Education.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1987 - Educational Theory 37 (2):169-177.
  5. Whitehead, Process Philosophy, and Education.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1982 - Upa.
    This present study began as the author's extension and application of ideas from Whitehead's work to the subject of education, using a chapter from Whitehead's book Science and the Modern World and a pamphlet, The Rhythm of Education as the starting point.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  37
    I. Plato’s Meno as Form and as Content of Secondary School Courses in Philosophy.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):107-115.
  7.  62
    The Mathematical Imagery of Plato, Republic X.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1984 - Teaching Philosophy 7 (3):59-63.
  8.  66
    Plato's Philosophy of Education: The Meno Experiment and the Republic Curriculum.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1970 - Educational Theory 20 (3):207-228.
  9.  9
    From Platonism to Neo-Platonism.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1955 - Philosophical Review 64 (2):318.
  10.  97
    The Voynich 'Roger Bacon' Cipher Manuscript: Deciphered Maps of Stars.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1976 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 39:139-150.
  11. Dewey, Russell, Whitehead: Philosophers as Educators.Brian Patrick Hendley, George Kimball Plochmann & Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1986 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    Hendley argues that philosophers of edu­cation should reject their preoccupation of the past 25_ _years with defining terms and analyzing concepts and once again embrace the philosophical task of con­structing general theories of education. Exemplars of that tradition are John Dewey, Bertrand Russell, and Alfred North Whitehead, who formulated theo­ries of education that were tested. Dewey and Russell ran their own schools, and Whitehead served as a university admin­istrator and as a member of many com­mittees created to study education. After (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  9
    Plato's Parmenides and Positive MetaphysicsAn Approach to the Metaphysics of Plato Through the Parmenides. [REVIEW]Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1959 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (2):271-277.
    But though the illumination cast on the text by this approach may be only a narrow band of light, it is nevertheless a brilliant one. The hypotheses do in fact, it is shown, lend themselves to treatment as a constructive "metaphysics of unity" in which each stage of the argument explores some further aspect of any entity which is one. This is a topic of genuine concern to all philosophy. Whether we are atomists or Hegelian idealists, our thinking involves decisions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  31
    The Book of Anaxagoras.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):149-150.
  14.  39
    "An Examination of Plato's Doctrines, Vol. 2: Plato on Knowledge and Reality," by I. M. Crombie.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1966 - Modern Schoolman 43 (3):274-277.
  15.  29
    Plato's Mathematical Imagination: The Mathematical Passages in the Dialogues and Their Interpretation.Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1954 - Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  16.  43
    The Genesis and Evolution of Time: A Critique of Interpretation in Physics.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1984 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (1):121-122.
    The author explores the theory that cosmic evolution leads to successive new, stratified kinds of time. Each lower level sets limits to and provides conditions for levels that are higher, but there is no complete reducibility of causal explanation of higher levels to lower. This account of evolution argues that rest is later than, and is derived from, an original state of constant motion. The derivation ends with the advent of the permanent stability of abstract concepts recognized by mind.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  38
    Insights and Oversights of Great Thinkers.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):253-254.
  18. Digression and Dialogue: The Seventh Letter and Plato's Literary Form.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1988 - In Charles L. Griswold (ed.), Platonic Writings/Platonic Readings. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 84--92.
  19.  53
    The Purpose of Plato’s Parmenides.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1980 - Ancient Philosophy 1 (1):39-47.
  20.  69
    Robert Hartman's Formal Axiology: An Extension. [REVIEW]Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1977 - Journal of Value Inquiry 11 (4):259-263.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  48
    A New Interpretation of Plato's Republic.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (20):661-670.
  22.  15
    Plato Studies as Contemporary Philosophy.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1952 - Review of Metaphysics 6 (2):315 - 324.
    But this is only half of the picture. Plato makes sense to the modern American reader because that reader is influenced by a physics and cosmology radically Platonic in historic origin and in content; and because he is influenced by mathematics and formal logic which are producing challenging original speculation, and which are of a Platonic character both in genesis and nature.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  20
    Why Whitehead?Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1991 - Process Studies 20 (2):72-77.
  24.  19
    “Discussion Upon Fundamental Principles of Education”.Alfred North Whitehead & Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1984 - Process Studies 14 (1):41-43.
  25.  40
    Teaching Plato's Republic VIII and IX.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1980 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (3):51-57.
  26.  42
    Teaching Plato's Republic IX.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1980 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (3):333-337.
  27. Western Philosophic Systems and Their Cyclic Transformations.Robert S. Brumbaugh & George Kimball Plochmann - 1992 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    This study of Western philosophic systems, their types, history, relations, and projected future in the next half century, stems from Robert S. Brumbaugh’s forty-year fascination with the paradox of the many consistent overarching systems of ideas that are nevertheless mutually exclusive. Brumbaugh argues that when we isolate these systems’s patterns and look at them more abstractly, they consistently fall into four main types, and the interaction of these four types of explanation and order is a dominant theme in the history (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  25
    On Systematic Mispunctuation in the Plato MSS of the Oxford B Family.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1983 - Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):89-90.
  29.  36
    An Aristotelian Defense of "Non-Aristotelian" Logics.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (19):582-585.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  7
    Plato on the One.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1964 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 24 (3):448-449.
  31.  34
    Teaching Plato's Republic VIII.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1980 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (3):331-333.
  32.  23
    A Retracted Exile?: Poetry and Republic 614b.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):172-173.
  33.  36
    A Companion to Plato's Republic.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1979 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):233-234.
  34.  36
    Time Passes: Platonic Variations.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (4):711 - 726.
    THE PURPOSE of this discussion is a double one. I want to show, in the first place, how a Platonic attempt to describe the structures of time that we encounter in becoming presupposes a reference to the more stable structures of the realm of being. The result of this presupposition is a temptation to substitute the more stable forms for the less intellectually congenial ones, thus turning "time" into a dimension of space or a series of arithmetical "units." This can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  34
    Aristotle's Philosophy of Education.Robert S. Brumbaugh & Nathaniel M. Laurence - 1959 - Educational Theory 9 (1):1-15.
  36.  20
    A Retracted Exile?Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):172-173.
  37.  14
    Jaap Mansfeld, "Studies in the Historiography of Greek Philosophy". [REVIEW]Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (1):131.
  38.  24
    Aristotle's Outline of the Problems of First Philosophy.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1954 - Review of Metaphysics 7 (3):511 - 521.
    There is no agreement at all, however, among translators, editors, and scholars, as to what is the number of problems that Aristotle proposes, nor what are the relations of importance among them. The list is given sometimes as fourteen or fifteen, sometimes as six, as nine, as twelve, as eight, and various other numbers. To a reader remembering the meticulous detail with which Aristotle told his students just how to construct topical notebooks and outlines, it seems quite unthinkable that he (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  20
    Editor’s Introduction.Robert S. Brumbaugh & Brian Hendley - 1991 - Process Studies 20 (2):65-66.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  31
    Applied Metaphysics: Truth and Passing Time.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):647 - 666.
    Whitehead's brilliant analysis of the problems of the modern world concluded, you will recall, that our century is one in which progress and welfare require—and require to an unprecedented degree—redesign of our basic inherited "common sense" conceptions. We are trapped and hindered in our thought and planning by unrealistic and outmoded notions: of location, of duration, of education, of social progress, of beauty, of religion. I am convinced that he was right; but how many of us have thought about the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  22
    Space as Neither Vacuum nor Plenum.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1977 - Process Studies 7 (3):161-172.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  22
    Four Kinds of Time?Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1987 - Process Studies 16 (2):146-146.
  43.  28
    An Academy Inscription.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):171-172.
  44.  30
    Plato's Divided Line.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1952 - Review of Metaphysics 5 (4):529 - 534.
    The directions for constructing the figure are to take a line cut into two unequal parts, and cut each part in the same ratio. The proportions of the lengths of segments to one another will then represent the "relative clarity" of each of four kinds of knowledge, and Book vi. closes with a summary of these proportions. If we letter the four segments from top to bottom a, b, c, and d, their relation is a:b :: c:d. From the context, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  24
    Understanding Plato.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):299-301.
  46. The Philosophers of Greece.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1964 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 30 (1):174-175.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. Philosophical Themes in Modern Education.Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1973 - University Press of America.
  48.  26
    The Text of Plato’s Parmenides.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (1):140 - 148.
    I myself became interested in textual work when I began checking the logical rigor of Plato’s Parmenides hypotheses. To my great surprise, the proof patterns were not simply valid, but as woodenly uniform and rigorous as Euclid’s Elements. Such rigor was exactly what a Neo-Platonist like Proclus would have expected, admired, and possibly imposed; it is not paralleled anywhere else in Plato. At that time, it was believed that the three primary manuscripts containing this dialogue—Oxford B, Venice T, and Vienna (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  12
    Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought From Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century. Clarence J. Glacken.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1968 - Isis 59 (3):332-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  25
    Logic and Time.Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (4):647 - 656.
    As a beginning, consider the perennial ethical and legal problem of freedom versus determinism. But now put this in the context of the relation of expert testimony to criminal law. As psychiatry and social science develop greater explanatory power, we seem destined to an extension of the defense of irresistible impulse to any criminal action. A legal psychology which talks about "a corrupt will" will run the risk of being dismissed as an "unscientific anachronism," and jurisprudence will be replaced by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 102