Results for 'Robert Tripp'

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  1.  22
    Biodiversity and Modern Crop Varieties: Sharpening the Debate. [REVIEW]Robert Tripp - 1996 - Agriculture and Human Values 13 (4):48-63.
    Debates about the relationship between agricultural technology and the conservation of crop genetic diversity are often hampered by unclear vocabulary and imprecise data. Various interpretations of the terms “modern variety,” “local variety,” “hybrid,” and “green revolution” are first explored, and then evidence is examined regarding the effect of modern varieties on intra- and intercrop diversity, risk, input use, and farmer decision-making. The objective is to urge a more reasoned debate about the future of plant genetic resources.
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  2.  68
    Liberalization of Peru's Formal Seed Sector.Jeffery W. Bentley, Robert Tripp & Roberto Delgado de la Flor - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):319-331.
    During the 1990s, the Government of Peru began to aggressivelyprivatize agriculture. The government stopped loaning money to farmers' cooperatives and closed the government rice-buying company. The government even rented out most of its researchstations and many senior scientists lost their jobs. As part of this trend, the government eliminated its seed certification agency. Instead, private seed certification committees were set up with USAID funding and technical advise from a US university. The committees were supposed to become self-financing (bycertifying seed grown (...)
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  3.  5
    Managers’ Restorative Versus Punitive Responses to Employee Wrongdoing: A Qualitative Investigation.Nathan Robert Neale, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Jerry Goodstein & Thomas M. Tripp - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (3):603-625.
    A growing body of literature has examined managers’ use of restorative practices in the workplace. However, little is currently known about why managers use restorative practices as opposed to alternative responses. We employed a qualitative interview technique to develop an inductive model of managers’ restorative versus punitive response in the context of employee wrongdoing. The findings reveal a set of key motivating and moderating influences on the manager’s decision to respond to wrongdoing in a restorative versus punitive manner. The findings (...)
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  4.  43
    I—Robert Audi: Moral Perception and Moral Knowledge.Robert Audi - 2010 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):79-97.
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  5. Free Will and Indeterminism: Robert Kane’s Libertarianism.Robert Francis Allen - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30:341-355.
    Drawing on Aristotle’s notion of “ultimate responsibility,” Robert Kane argues that to be exercising a free will an agent must have taken some character forming decisions for which there were no sufficient conditions or decisive reasons.<sup>1</sup> That is, an agent whose will is free not only had the ability to develop other dispositions, but could have exercised that ability without being irrational. To say it again, a person has a free will just in case her character is the product (...)
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  6.  16
    I—Robert Stalnaker.Robert Stalnaker - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):141-156.
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  7.  19
    II—Robert Sugden: On Modelling Vagueness—and onnotModelling Incommensurability.Robert Sugden - 2009 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83 (1):95-113.
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  8.  46
    Free Will and Indeterminism: Robert Kane’s Libertarianism.Robert Francis Allen - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30:341-355.
    Drawing on Aristotle’s notion of “ultimate responsibility,” Robert Kane argues that to be exercising a free will an agent must have taken some character forming decisions for which there were no sufficient conditions or decisive reasons. That is, an agent whose will is free not only had the ability to develop values and beliefs besides those that presently make up her motives, but could have exercised that ability without being irrational. An agent wills freely, on this view, by beingultimately (...)
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  9. On Considering a Possible World as Actual: Robert Stalnaker.Robert Stalnaker - 2001 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75 (1):141-156.
    [Robert Stalnaker] Saul Kripke made a convincing case that there are necessary truths that are knowable only a posteriori as well as contingent truths that are knowable a priori. A number of philosophers have used a two-dimensional model semantic apparatus to represent and clarify the phenomena that Kripke pointed to. According to this analysis, statements have truth-conditions in two different ways depending on whether one considers a possible world 'as actual' or 'as counterfactual' in determining the truth-value of the (...)
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  10.  24
    II—Robert Stalnaker.Robert Stalnaker - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):153-168.
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  11.  19
    Thinking as a Team: Towards an Explanation of Nonselfish Behavior*: Robert Sugden.Robert Sugden - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):69-89.
    For most of the problems that economists consider, the assumption that agents are self-interested works well enough, generating predictions that are broadly consistent with observation. In some significant cases, however, we find economic behavior that seems to be inconsistent with self-interest. In particular, we find that some public goods and some charitable ventures are financed by the independent voluntary contributions of many thousands of individuals. In Britain, for example, the lifeboat service is entirely financed by voluntary contributions. In all rich (...)
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  12.  47
    Autobiographical Reminiscences of Robert Rosen.Robert Rosen - 2006 - Axiomathes 16 (1):1-23.
  13.  63
    Review of Robert D. Rupert, Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind[REVIEW]Robert A. Wilson - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (3).
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  14.  59
    The Hiddenness of God*: ROBERT McKIM.Robert McKim - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (1):141-161.
    Neither the existence of God nor the nature of God is apparent or obvious. If God exists, why is it not entirely clear to everyone that this is so? How can theists explain God's hiddenness, and how plausible are their explanations? God, if God exists, is an omnipotent, morally good, omnipresent being, than whom none greater can be conceived. Surely it is well within the abilities of God to let God's existence and nature be known to us. Why isn't the (...)
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  15. Kant's Virtue Ethics: Robert B. Louden.Robert B. Louden - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (238):473 - 489.
    Among moral attributes true virtue alone is sublime. … [I]t is only by means of this idea [of virtue] that any judgment as to moral worth or its opposite is possible. … Everything good that is not based on a morally good disposition … is nothing but pretence and glittering misery. 1.
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  16. Almeder, Robert, Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2000), 211 Pages. Audi, Robert, Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (London: Routledge, 1998), 340 Pages. [REVIEW]Robert Baird, Reagan Ramsower, Stuart E. Rosenbaum, Victoria Davion, Clark Wolf, John Martin Fischer, S. J. Mark Ravizza, Margaret Gilbert, Christopher W. Gowans & Jorge J. Gracia - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4:419-422.
     
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  17.  74
    Robert Owen on Education.Robert Owen - 1969 - London: Cambridge University Press.
    Robert Owen was one of the most extraordinary Englishmen who ever lived and a great man. In a way his history is the history of the establishment of modern industrial Britain, reflected in the mind and activities of a very intelligent, capable and responsible industrialist, alive to the best social thought of his time. The organisation of industrial labour, factory legislation, education, trade unionism, co-operation, rationalism: he was passionately and ably engaged in all of them. His community at New (...)
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  18.  22
    Epistemic Consequentialism: Robert Stalnaker.Robert Stalnaker - 2002 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):153-168.
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  19.  13
    Walter Charleton, Robert Boyle, and the Acceptance of Epicurean Atomism in England.Robert Kargon - 1964 - Isis 55:184-192.
  20.  77
    Robert Howell, 1992, Kant's Transcendental Deduction: An Analysis of Main Themes in His Critical Philosophy.Robert Paul Wolff - 1997 - Synthese 113 (1):117-144.
  21. The Works of the Honourable Robert Boyle.Robert Boyle - 1999
  22. The Devil in the Details: Asymptotic Reasoning in Explanation, Reduction, and Emergence.Robert W. Batterman - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Robert Batterman examines a form of scientific reasoning called asymptotic reasoning, arguing that it has important consequences for our understanding of the scientific process as a whole. He maintains that asymptotic reasoning is essential for explaining what physicists call universal behavior. With clarity and rigor, he simplifies complex questions about universal behavior, demonstrating a profound understanding of the underlying structures that ground them. This book introduces a valuable new method that is certain to fill explanatory gaps across disciplines.
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  23.  24
    The Conservative Mode: Robert A. Millikan and the Twentieth-Century Revolution in Physics.Robert H. Kargon - 1977 - Isis 68 (4):509-526.
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  24.  84
    The Ethics of Belief and the Morality of Action: Intellectual Responsibility and Rational Disagreement: Robert Audi.Robert Audi - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (1):5-29.
    The contemporary explosion of information makes intellectual responsibility more needed than ever. The uncritical tend to believe too much that is unsubstantiated; the overcritical tend to believe too little that is true. A central problem for this paper is to formulate standards to guide an intellectually rigorous search for a mean between excessive credulity and indiscriminate skepticism. A related problem is to distinguish intellectual responsibility for what we believe from moral responsibility for what we do. A third problem is how (...)
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  25. Act Utilitarianism and Decision Procedures: Robert L. Frazier.Robert L. Frazier - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (1):43-53.
    A standard objection to act utilitarian theories is that they are not helpful in deciding what it is morally permissible for us to do when we actually have to make a choice between alternatives. That is, such theories are worthless as decision procedures. A standard reply to this objection is that act utilitarian theories can be evaluated solely as theories about right-making characteristics and, when so evaluated, their inadequacy as decision procedures is irrelevant. Even if somewhat unappealing, this is an (...)
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  26. Some Strategies for the First Two Years.Susan Ervin-Tripp - 1973 - In T. E. Moore (ed.), Cognitive Development and the Acquisition of Language. Academic. pp. 261--286.
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  27.  9
    Walter Charleton, Robert Boyle, and the Acceptance of Epicurean Atomism in England.Robert Kargon - 1964 - Isis 55 (2):184-192.
  28.  14
    What Do Online Complainers Want? An Examination of the Justice Motivations and the Moral Implications of Vigilante and Reparation Schemas.Yany Grégoire, Renaud Legoux, Thomas M. Tripp, Marie-Louise Radanielina-Hita, Jeffrey Joireman & Jeffrey D. Rotman - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):167-188.
    This research aims to understand how two basic schemas—vigilante and reparation—influence online public complaining. Drawing on two experiments, a longitudinal field study and content analysis of online complaints, the current research makes three core contributions. First, we show that for similar service failures, each schema is associated with different justice motivations, which have different moral implications for consumers. Second, vigilante and reparation complainers write complaints in a different manner and are drawn to different online platforms; this information is helpful to (...)
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  29. J. S. Mill's Language of Pleasures*: Robert W. Hoag.Robert W. Hoag - 1992 - Utilitas 4 (2):247-278.
    A significant feature of John Stuart Mill's moral theory is the introduction of qualitative differences as relevant to the comparative value of pleasures. Despite its significance, Mill presents his doctrine of qualities of pleasures in only a few paragraphs in the second chapter of Utilitarianism, where he begins the brief discussion by saying: utilitarian writers in general have placed the superiority of mental over bodily pleasures chiefly … in their circumstantial advantages rather than in their intrinsic nature.… [B]ut they might (...)
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  30.  68
    The Axiology of Robert S. Hartman: A Critical Study. [REVIEW]Robert W. Mueller - 1969 - Journal of Value Inquiry 3 (1):19-29.
    Formal axiology is based on the logical nature of meaning, namely intension, and on the structure of intension as a set of predicates. It applies set theory to this set of predicates. Set theory is a certain kind of mathematics that deals with subsets in general, and of finite and infinite sets in particular. Since mathematics is objective and a priori, formal axiology is an objective and a priori science; and a test based on it is an objective test based (...)
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  31. The Significance of Free Will.Robert Kane - 1996 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Robert Kane provides a critical overview of debates about free will of the past half century, relating this recent inquiry to the broader history of the free will issue and to vital currents of twentieth century thought. Kane also defends a traditional libertarian or incompatibilist view of free will, employing arguments that are both new to philosophy and that respond to contemporary developments in physics and biology, neuro science, and the cognitive and behavioral sciences.
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  32.  7
    Finite Homogeneous 3‐Graphs.Alistair H. Lachlan & Allyson Tripp - 1995 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 41 (3):287-306.
  33.  32
    Miracles, Physicalism, and the Laws of Nature: ROBERT A. LARMER.Robert A. Larmer - 2008 - Religious Studies 44 (2):149-159.
    In his paper ‘Miracles: metaphysics, physics, and physicalism’, 1 Kirk McDermid appears to have two primary goals. The first is to demonstrate that my account of how God might produce a miracle without violating any laws of nature is radically flawed. The second is to suggest two alternative accounts, one suitable for a deterministic world, one suitable for an indeterministic world, which allow for the occurrence of a miracle without violation of the laws of nature, yet do not suffer from (...)
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  34.  90
    Situationist Social Psychology and J. S. Mill's Conception of Character: Robert F. Card.Robert F. Card - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):481-493.
    The situationist challenge to global character traits claims that on the basis of findings in social psychology, we should only accept at most the existence of local or context-sensitive traits. In this article I explore a neglected area of J. S. Mill's work to outline an account of context-sensitive traits. This account of traits, coupled with a sophisticated consequentialist ethical framework, suggests an interesting view on which persons govern the circumstances of their actions in order to best promote overall well-being.
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  35.  76
    Actual Preferences, Actual People: Robert E. Goodin.Robert E. Goodin - 1991 - Utilitas 3 (1):113-119.
    Maximizing want-satisfaction per se is a relatively unattractive aspiration, for it seems to assume that wants are somehow disembodied entities with independent moral claims all of their own. Actually, of course, they are possessed by particular people. What preference-utilitarians should be concerned with is how people's lives go—the fulfilment of their projects and the satisfaction of their desires. In an old-fashioned way of talking, it is happy people rather than happiness per se that utilitarians should be striving to produce.
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  36.  26
    Reply to Professor Rachels: ROBERT A. OAKES.Robert A. Oakes - 1972 - Religious Studies 8 (2):165-167.
  37. Robert Nozick.From Robert Nozick - 1999 - In Nigel Warburton (ed.), Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge.
  38.  48
    Organized Worlds: Explorations in Technology and Organization with Robert Cooper.Robert C. H. Chia (ed.) - 1998 - Routledge.
    A companion volume to In the Realm of Organization, this book explores in detail the intricate relationships that exist between technology, representation and organization from a diversity of perspectives, relocating the study of organization in wider social theory.
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  39.  71
    I. Emotions, Thoughts and Feelings: What is a ‘Cognitive Theory’ of the Emotions and Does It Neglect Affectivity?: Robert C. Solomon.Robert C. Solomon - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:1-18.
    I have been arguing, for almost thirty years now, that emotions have been unduly neglected in philosophy. Back in the seventies, it was an argument that attracted little sympathy. I have also been arguing that emotions are a ripe for philosophical analysis, a view that, as evidenced by the Manchester 2001 conference and a large number of excellent publications, has now become mainstream. My own analysis of emotion, first published in 1973, challenged the sharp divide between emotions and rationality, insisted (...)
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  40.  29
    Measuring Opportunity: Toward a Contractarian Measure of Individual Interest*: Robert Sugden.Robert Sugden - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):34-60.
    Liberals have often been attracted by contractarian modes of argument— and with good reason. Any system of social organization requires that some constraints be imposed on individuals' freedom of action; it is a central problem for any liberal political theory to show which constraints can be justified, and which cannot. A contractarian justification works by showing that the constraints in question can be understood as if they were the product of an agreement, voluntarily entered into by every member of society. (...)
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  41.  51
    Response to Anders Tolland's ‘Iterated Non‐Refutation: Robert Lockie on Relativism’1.Robert Lockie - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (2):245 – 254.
    This Article is a short response to Anders Tolland's "Iterated Non-Refutation: Robert Lockie on Relativism", International Journal of Philosophical Studies Vol. 14, no. 2, 245-254, 2006. Tolland's article was itself a response to Lockie, R (2003) "Relativism and Reflexivity", International Journal of Philosophical Studies Vol. 11, no. 3, 319-339.
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  42.  7
    Law, Rights and Discourse: The Legal Philosophy of Robert Alexy.George Pavlakos & Robert Alexy (eds.) - 2007 - Hart.
    This volume reflects the breadth of Alexy's philosophy, identifies new areas of inquiry and offers a new impetus to the discourse theory of law.
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  43. Minimal Model Explanations.Robert W. Batterman & Collin C. Rice - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (3):349-376.
    This article discusses minimal model explanations, which we argue are distinct from various causal, mechanical, difference-making, and so on, strategies prominent in the philosophical literature. We contend that what accounts for the explanatory power of these models is not that they have certain features in common with real systems. Rather, the models are explanatory because of a story about why a class of systems will all display the same large-scale behavior because the details that distinguish them are irrelevant. This story (...)
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  44. Boundaries of the Mind: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences - Cognition.Robert A. Wilson - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Where does the mind begin and end? Most philosophers and cognitive scientists take the view that the mind is bounded by the skull or skin of the individual. Robert Wilson, in this provocative and challenging 2004 book, provides the foundations for the view that the mind extends beyond the boundary of the individual. The approach adopted offers a unique blend of traditional philosophical analysis, cognitive science, and the history of psychology and the human sciences. The companion volume, Genes and (...)
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  45. Entitlement Theories of Justice: From Nozick to Roemer and Beyond: Robert J. Van der Veen & Philippe Van Parijs.Robert J. van der Veen - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):69-81.
    In Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick contrasts entitlement theories of justice and “traditional” theories such as Rawls', utilitarianism or egalitarianism, and advocates the former against the latter. What exactly is an entitlement theory of justice? Nozick's book offers two distinct characterizations. On the one hand, he explicitly describes “the general outlines of the entitlement theory” as maintaining “that the holdings of a person are just if he is entitled to them by the principles of justice in acquisition and (...)
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  46.  68
    Conditionals as Random Variables Robert Stalnaker and Richard Jeffrey.Robert Stalnaker - 1994 - In Ellery Eells, Brian Skyrms & Ernest W. Adams (eds.), Probability and Conditionals: Belief Revision and Rational Decision. Cambridge University Press. pp. 31.
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  47.  26
    The Argument From Evil: ROBERT J. RICHMAN.Robert J. Richman - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):203-211.
    The traditional problem of evil is set forth, by no means for the first time, in Part X of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion in these familiar words: ‘Is [God] willing to prevent evil, but not able? then he is impotent. Is he able, but not willing? then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? whence then is evil?’ This formulation of the problem of evil obviously suggests an argument to the effect that the existence of evil in (...)
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  48.  2
    Robert Sternfeld and Harold Zyskind, "Plato's "Meno": A Philosophy of Man as Acquisitive". [REVIEW]Robert G. Turnbull - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (4):497.
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  49.  43
    Religious Experience and Rational Certainty*: ROBERT A. OAKES.Robert A. Oakes - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (3):311-318.
    The purpose of this paper is to clear up the long-standing veritable mountain of misinterpretation, perpetuated from critic to critic, concerning the admittedly problematic concept of self-authenticating religious experience. While it may well be the case, as many have argued, that a sort of ‘experience’ about which one could not be mistaken is simply a logically impossible state of affairs, this cannot be known to be the case so long as what is under attack is a bogus concept, obviously absurd, (...)
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  50.  29
    Classical Theism and Pantheism: A Victory for Process Theism?: ROBERT A. OAKES.Robert A. Oakes - 1977 - Religious Studies 13 (2):167-173.
    In Anselm's Discovery , Professor Hartshorne makes the rather startling and counterintuitive claim that ‘…there is indeed no issue between theism and pantheism. We all exist in the divine being, as St Paul said.’ 1 Classical or orthodox theists, it seems eminently fair to say, can be expected to recoil from any such suggestion with more than a little indignation. First of all, it might well be objected that Hartshorne - as a ‘process theist’ - is not a classical theist, (...)
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