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  1.  17
    Nemesis, Envy, and Justice in Aristotle’s Political Science.Robert Wyllie - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):237-260.
    Aristotle does not explain why ordinary citizens who lack the virtue of justice nevertheless praise justice and the law. Indignation, defined as pain at the undeserved gains of others, is a promising candidate in the list of means regarding virtues and passions in Book 2 of the Nicomachean Ethics. However, as many scholars have noted, Aristotle’s description of indignation as a mean is flawed. Moreover, indignation is the only characteristic in the list that disappears from the inquiry thereafter. I argue (...)
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  2.  2
    In the Swarm of Byung-Chul Han.Steven Knepper & Robert Wyllie - 2020 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2020 (191):33-45.
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  3. Introduction.Steven Knepper & Robert Wyllie - 2017 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2017 (178):3-7.
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  4.  1
    Not a Fall, but a Rise (for Some): Hegel and the “Genesis” of a New Liberalism.Robert Wyllie - 2017 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2017 (178):55-76.
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  5.  35
    Kierkegaard's Eyes of Faith: The Paradoxical Voluntarism of Climacus's "Philosophical Fragments".Robert Wyllie - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (4):545-564.
    Scholarly debate about Kierkegaard’s fideism focuses upon whether his voluntarism—the doctrine that religious faith can be simply willed—is practicable or credible. This paper proposes that a close reading of Philosophical Fragments and The Concept of Anxiety reveals that there is a role for both the will and the intellect in Kierkegaard’s concept of faith. Kierkegaard arrives at a compatibilism that emphasizes the roles of both the intellect and the will. The intellect perceives a “moment” that paradoxically intersects time and eternity (...)
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  6.  4
    Habermas, 1968, and the turn to aesthetic‐expressive protest.Robert Wyllie - 2020 - Constellations 27 (3):452-465.
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  7.  16
    Causal explanations in mental event contexts.Robert Wyllie - 1980 - Philosophical Papers 9 (May):15-31.