19 found
Order:
  1. Challenges of Ethical and Legal Responsibilities When Technologies' Uses and Users Change: Social Networking Sites, Decision-Making Capacity and Dementia. [REVIEW]Rachel Batchelor, Ania Bobrowicz, Robin Mackenzie & Alisoun Milne - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):99-108.
    Successful technologies’ ubiquity changes uses, users and ethicolegal responsibilities and duties of care. We focus on dementia to review critically ethicolegal implications of increasing use of social networking sites (SNS) by those with compromised decision-making capacity, assessing concerned parties’ responsibilities. Although SNS contracts assume ongoing decision-making capacity, many users’ may be compromised or declining. Resulting ethicolegal issues include capacity to give informed consent to contracts, protection of online privacy including sharing and controlling data, data leaks between different digital platforms, and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  11
    Don't Let Them Eat Cake! A View From Across the Pond.Robin Mackenzie - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):16-18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure.Robin Mackenzie - 2010 - Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  12
    Addiction in Public Health and Criminal Justice System Governance: Neuroscience, Enhancement and Happiness Research.Robin Mackenzie - 2006 - Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (1):92-109.
    Present regulations and prohibitions relating to psychoactive substances rest upon socio-historically contingent and hence arguably irrational foundations. New evidence bases located in post-genomic genetics and neuroscience hold the potential to disrupt them through demonstrating a lack of congruence between the regulations and prohibitions and the alleged and actual harms. How far might we use such knowledge to drive policy? What limits, if any, should be placed on our choices, and what attempts to influence these may be seen as acceptable? This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  44
    Regulating Reprogenetics: Strategic Sacralisation and Semantic Massage. [REVIEW]Robin Mackenzie - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (4):305-319.
    This paper forms part of the feminist critique of the regulatory consequences of biomedicine’s systematic exclusion of the role of women’s bodies in the development of reprogenetic technologies. I suggest that strategic use of notions of the sacred to decontextualise and delimit disagreement fosters this marginalisation. Here conceptions of the sacred and sacralisation afford a means by which pragmatic consensus over regulation may be achieved, through the deployment of a bricolage of dense images associated with cultural loyalties to solidify support (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  67
    How the Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion and the Neuroscience of Dehumanization/Rehumanization Can Contribute to Animal Activists' Strategies: Bestia Sacer II.Robin Mackenzie - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):407-424.
    Juxtaposing the continental philosophy of inclusion/exclusion and the cognitive and affective neuroscience of dehumanization, infrahumanization, and rehumanization may inform animal activists’ strategies. Both fields focus upon how we decide who counts and who doesn’t. Decisions over who’s human and who isn’t are not simply about species membership but involve biopolitical value judgments over who we wish to include or exclude. Posthumanists seek to disrupt the biopolitics of inclusion/exclusion, partly to heal ethical and political relations between human and nonhuman animals. Calarco (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Synthetic Biology and (Re)Productive Liberties : Biosecurity, Biosecrecy, and Regulating New Technologies with Futures in Mind.Robin Mackenzie - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  31
    End of Life Decision Making, Policy and the Criminal Justice System: Untrained Carers Assuming Responsibility (UCARes) and Their Uncertain Legal Liabilities.Robin Mackenzie & H. Biggs - 2006 - Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (1):118-128.
    This article will explore some previously unrecognised legal and ethical issues associated with informal care-giving and criminal justice in the context of end of life decision-making. It was prompted by a recent case in Leeds Crown Court, which raises important issues for the people who care for their loved ones at home and for the criminal justice system more generally. Government figures estimate that over 5.2 million Britons are responsible for the care of relatives or loved ones. In order to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  16
    Gendered Readings of Obligations: Social Lore or Strict Legal Forms? [REVIEW]Hazel Biggs & Robin Mackenzie - 2000 - Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):1-4.
  10.  7
    Vulnerability in Varying Contexts Affecting Decision Making in Patients With Treatment-Resistant Depression Contemplating Deep Brain Stimulation: Implications for Clinicians.Robin Mackenzie - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (4):228-230.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Auchmuty, Rosemary, 163, 315 Biggs, Hazel, 291 Bridgeman, Jo, 213 Burton, Frances, 113.Mandy Burton, Eileen V. Fegan, Piyel Haldar, Colin Harvey, Kirsty Horsey, Heather Keating, Robin MacKenzie, Kate Malleson, Ambreena Manji & Clare McGlynn - 2003 - Feminist Legal Studies 11 (325).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  9
    Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Ed., Finding Consciousness: The Neuroscience, Ethics and Law of Severe Brain Damage. [REVIEW]Robin Mackenzie - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):4-6.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  11
    Ms X: A Promising New View of Anorexia Nervosa, Futility, and End-of-Life Decisions in a Very Recent English Case.Robin Mackenzie - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):57-58.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  11
    Lest We Forget: Feminism and Reappraising the Force of Tradition. [REVIEW]Robin Mackenzie - 1996 - Feminist Legal Studies 4 (1):73-88.
  15.  7
    Greed, Gullibility, and Golden Eggs: FMT and Ethical, Legal, and Practical Difficulties Regulating Transactions in Readily Accessed and Exchanged Bodily Products.Robin Mackenzie - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):57-59.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  30
    From Sancitity to Screening: Genetic Disabilities, Risk and Rhetorical Strategies in Wrongful Birth and Wrongful Conception Cases. [REVIEW]Robin Mackenzie - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):175-191.
    This analysis scrutinises the rhetorical strategies used by judges in wrongful life and wrongful birth actions as evidence for the assertion that the judicial reading of public policy in such cases has undergone a significant shift which is likely to accelerate as genetic knowledge grows and health care resources shrink. The implications of the predicted move towards increased genetic testing of prospective parents are traversed in relation to feminist analyses of the impact of genetics on reproductive technology. These are viewed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  6
    S. Sherwin and B. Parish (Eds.), Women,Medicine, Ethics and the Law.Robin MacKenzie - 2003 - Feminist Legal Studies 11 (2):211-212.
  18.  3
    Sexbots : nos prochains partenaires.Robin Mackenzie - 2015 - Multitudes 58 (1):192.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  3
    Lest We Forget: Gender as an Analytic Tool in the Law of International Relations.Robin Mackenzie - 1996 - Feminist Legal Studies 4 (1):73-88.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark