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Robin S. Dillon [26]Robin Sleigh Dillon [1]
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Robin S. Dillon
Lehigh University
  1.  60
    Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Respect and Care: Toward Moral Integration.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):105 - 132.
    In her provocative discussion of the challenge posed to the traditional impartialist, justice-focused conception of morality by the new-wave care perspective in ethics, Annette Baier calls for ‘a “marriage” of the old male and newly articulated female... moral wisdom,’ to produce a new ‘cooperative’ moral theory that ‘harmonize[s] justice and care.’ I want in this paper to play matchmaker, proposing one possible conjugal bonding: a union of two apparently dissimilar modes of what Nel Noddings calls ‘meeting the other morally,’ a (...)
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  3. Self-Respect: Moral, Emotional, Political.Robin S. Dillon - 1997 - Ethics 107 (2):226-249.
  4. Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (eds.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  5. Self‐Forgiveness and Self‐Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2001 - Ethics 112 (1):53-83.
  6.  75
    Dignity, Character and Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    This is the first anthology to bring together a selection of the most important contemporary philosophical essays on the nature and moral significance of self-respect. Representing a diversity of views, the essays illustrate the complexity of self-respect and explore its connections to such topics as personhood, dignity, rights, character, autonomy, integrity, identity, shame, justice, oppression and empowerment. The book demonstrates that self-respect is a formidable concern which goes to the very heart of both moral theory and moral life. Contributors: Bernard (...)
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  7.  78
    How to Lose Your Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2):125 - 139.
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  8.  81
    Toward a Feminist Conception of Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):52-69.
    The concept of self - respect is often invoked in feminist theorizing. But both women's too-common experiences of struggling to have self - respect and the results of feminist critiques of related moral concepts suggest the need for feminist critique and reconceptualization of self - respect. I argue that a familiar conception of self - respect is masculinist, thus less accessible to women and less than conducive to liberation. Emancipatory theory and practice require a suitably feminist conception of self - (...)
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  9. Respect for Persons, Identity, and Information Technology.Robin S. Dillon - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):17-28.
    There is surprisingly little attention in Information Technology ethics to respect for persons, either as an ethical issue or as a core value of IT ethics or as a conceptual tool for discussing ethical issues of IT. In this, IT ethics is very different from another field of applied ethics, bioethics, where respect is a core value and conceptual tool. This paper argues that there is value in thinking about ethical issues related to information technologies, especially, though not exclusively, issues (...)
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  10. Arrogance, Self-Respect and Personhood.Robin S. Dillon - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (5-6):101-126.
    This essay aims to show that arrogance corrupts the very qualities that make persons persons. The corruption is subtle but profound, and the key to understanding it lies in understanding the connections between different kinds of arrogance, self-respect, respect for others and personhood. Making these connections clear is the second aim of this essay. It will build on Kant's claim that self-respect is central to living our human lives as persons and that arrogance is, at its core, the failure to (...)
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  11.  12
    Respect and Care: Toward Moral Integration.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):105-131.
    In her provocative discussion of the challenge posed to the traditional impartialist, justice-focused conception of morality by the new-wave care perspective in ethics, Annette Baier calls for ‘a “marriage” of the old male and newly articulated female... moral wisdom,’ to produce a new ‘cooperative’ moral theory that ‘harmonize[s] justice and care.’ I want in this paper to play matchmaker, proposing one possible conjugal bonding: a union of two apparently dissimilar modes of what Nel Noddings calls ‘meeting the other morally,’ a (...)
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  12. Self-Respect and Self-Esteem.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
     
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  13. Arrogance.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International encyclopedia of Ethics.
     
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  14. Criticism and Compassion: The Ethics and Politics of Claudia Card.Robin S. Dillon & Robin S. Dillon and Armen Marsoobian (eds.) - 2018 - Blackwell.
    Claudia Card had a long and distinguished career as a philosopher that began at a time when being a woman in philosophy was not an easy matter and ended much too soon with her passing in 2015. Starting with her first and still widely-cited article, “On Mercy,” she published ten monographs and edited volumes and nearly 150 articles and reviews on topics in moral, social, and political philosophy. She is is most widely known for her influential work in analytic feminist (...)
     
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  15. Critical Character Theory: Toward a Feminist Theory of ‘Vice’.Robin S. Dillon - 2012 - In Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 83-114.
    Theorizing about human character to understand what it is to be a morally good person and how being morally good relates to acting rightly and living well has always been a central concern of moral philosophy. Traditional virtue theory, however, neglects two significant matters. The first is the sociopolitical dimensions of character: how character is shaped by, supports, and resists domination and subordination. While feminist ethics has begun to theorize virtue in relation to oppression, it shares with traditional virtue theory (...)
     
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  16. Feminist Approaches to Virtue Ethics.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Nancy E. Snow (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Virtue. pp. 377-397.
     
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  17. Feminist Virtue Ethics.Robin S. Dillon - 2017 - In Serene Khader Ann Garry (ed.), Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy. pp. 568-678.
     
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  18. “Humility and Self-Respect: Kantian and Feminist Perspectives”.Robin S. Dillon - 2021 - In Michael P. Lynch Mark Alfano (ed.), Routledge Handbook on the Philosophy of Humility. Routledge. pp. 59-71.
    For Kant and for feminists, self-respect is a morally central and morally powerful concern. In this paper I focus on some questions about the relation of self-respect to two other stances toward the self, humility and arrogance. Just as arrogance is usually treated as a serious vice, so humility is widely regarded as an important virtue. Indeed, it is supposed to be the virtue that opposes arrogance, keeping it in check or preventing it from developing in the first place. I’ve (...)
     
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  19. Kant on Arrogance and Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2003 - In Cheshire Calhoun (ed.), Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. pp. 191-216.
    Arrogance is traditionally regarded as among the worst of human vices. Kant’s discussion of one kind of arrogance as a violation of the categorical moral duty to respect other persons gives familiar support for this view. However, I argue that what Kant says about the ways in which another kind of arrogance is opposed to different kinds of self-respect reveals how profoundly vicious arrogance can be. As a failure of self-respect, arrogance is the Ur-Vice that corrupts moral agency and rational (...)
     
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  20. Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2006 - In Donald M. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2nd edition.
     
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  21. Respect: A Philosophical Perspective.Robin S. Dillon - 2007 - Gruppendynamik Und Organisationsberatung 2 (38):201-212.
     
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  22. Respect for Persons.Robin S. Dillon - 2020 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
     
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  23. “Self-Respect, Arrogance, and Power: A Feminist Perspective,”.Robin S. Dillon - forthcoming - In Richard Dean and Oliver Sensen (ed.), Respect for Persons.
    In many cultures arrogance is regarded as a serious vice and a cause of numerous social ills. Although its badness is typically thought to lie in its harmful consequences for other persons and things, I draw on Kant to argue that what makes it a vice is first and foremost the failure to respect oneself. But arrogance is not only a problem inside individuals. Drawing on feminist insights I argue that it is a systemic problem constructed in and reinforcing unjust (...)
     
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  24. “Self-Respect and Humility in Kant and Hill,”.Robin S. Dillon - 2015 - In Mark Timmons and Robert Johnson (ed.), Reason, Value, and Respect: Kantian Themes from the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr.,. pp. 42-69.
    For Kant and Hill, self-respect is a morally central and morally powerful concern. Both have also had some things to say in moral praise of humility and in condemnation of arrogance, a trait widely regarded as the vice to which the virtue of humility is the prevention and cure. Arrogance can easily be seen as a failure to respect both other people and oneself. It might be thought, however, that humility and self-respect are in tension, if not at odds with (...)
     
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  25.  8
    The Ethics of Need: Agency, Dignity, and Obligation, Sarah Clark Miller. [REVIEW]Robin S. Dillon - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (6):798-801.
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  26. 'What’s a Woman Worth? What’s Life Worth? Without Self-Respect?’: On the Value of Evaluative Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2004 - In Margaret Walker and Peggy DesAutels (ed.), Minds, Hearts, and Morality: Feminist Essays in Moral Psychology. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 47-68.
    In recent years philosophers have done impressive work explicating the nature and moral importance of a kind of self-respect Darwall calls “recognition self-respect,” which involves valuing oneself as the moral equal of every other person, regarding oneself as having basic moral rights and a legitimate claim to respectful treatment from other people just in virtue of being a person, and being unwilling to stand for having one’s rights violated or being treated as something less than a person. It is generally (...)
     
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