Results for 'Robin Sleigh Dillon'

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  1.  76
    Dignity, Character and Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    This is the first anthology to bring together a selection of the most important contemporary philosophical essays on the nature and moral significance of self-respect. Representing a diversity of views, the essays illustrate the complexity of self-respect and explore its connections to such topics as personhood, dignity, rights, character, autonomy, integrity, identity, shame, justice, oppression and empowerment. The book demonstrates that self-respect is a formidable concern which goes to the very heart of both moral theory and moral life. Contributors: Bernard (...)
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  2.  88
    Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Respect and Care: Toward Moral Integration.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):105 - 132.
    In her provocative discussion of the challenge posed to the traditional impartialist, justice-focused conception of morality by the new-wave care perspective in ethics, Annette Baier calls for ‘a “marriage” of the old male and newly articulated female... moral wisdom,’ to produce a new ‘cooperative’ moral theory that ‘harmonize[s] justice and care.’ I want in this paper to play matchmaker, proposing one possible conjugal bonding: a union of two apparently dissimilar modes of what Nel Noddings calls ‘meeting the other morally,’ a (...)
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  4. Criticism and Compassion: The Ethics and Politics of Claudia Card.Robin S. Dillon & Robin S. Dillon and Armen Marsoobian (eds.) - 2018 - Blackwell.
    Claudia Card had a long and distinguished career as a philosopher that began at a time when being a woman in philosophy was not an easy matter and ended much too soon with her passing in 2015. Starting with her first and still widely-cited article, “On Mercy,” she published ten monographs and edited volumes and nearly 150 articles and reviews on topics in moral, social, and political philosophy. She is is most widely known for her influential work in analytic feminist (...)
     
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  5. Self-Respect: Moral, Emotional, Political.Robin S. Dillon - 1997 - Ethics 107 (2):226-249.
  6. Self‐Forgiveness and Self‐Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2001 - Ethics 112 (1):53-83.
  7.  85
    How to Lose Your Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2):125 - 139.
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  8. Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2006 - In Donald M. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2nd edition.
     
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  9.  87
    Toward a Feminist Conception of Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):52-69.
    The concept of self - respect is often invoked in feminist theorizing. But both women's too-common experiences of struggling to have self - respect and the results of feminist critiques of related moral concepts suggest the need for feminist critique and reconceptualization of self - respect. I argue that a familiar conception of self - respect is masculinist, thus less accessible to women and less than conducive to liberation. Emancipatory theory and practice require a suitably feminist conception of self - (...)
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  10.  17
    Dillon, Robin, Ed. Dignity, Character, and Self-Respect.Roger Paden - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (4):878-879.
  11. Self-Respect and Self-Esteem.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
     
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  12. Respect for Persons, Identity, and Information Technology.Robin S. Dillon - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):17-28.
    There is surprisingly little attention in Information Technology ethics to respect for persons, either as an ethical issue or as a core value of IT ethics or as a conceptual tool for discussing ethical issues of IT. In this, IT ethics is very different from another field of applied ethics, bioethics, where respect is a core value and conceptual tool. This paper argues that there is value in thinking about ethical issues related to information technologies, especially, though not exclusively, issues (...)
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  13.  12
    Respect and Care: Toward Moral Integration.Robin S. Dillon - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):105-131.
    In her provocative discussion of the challenge posed to the traditional impartialist, justice-focused conception of morality by the new-wave care perspective in ethics, Annette Baier calls for ‘a “marriage” of the old male and newly articulated female... moral wisdom,’ to produce a new ‘cooperative’ moral theory that ‘harmonize[s] justice and care.’ I want in this paper to play matchmaker, proposing one possible conjugal bonding: a union of two apparently dissimilar modes of what Nel Noddings calls ‘meeting the other morally,’ a (...)
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  14. “Self-Respect and Humility in Kant and Hill,”.Robin S. Dillon - 2015 - In Mark Timmons and Robert Johnson (ed.), Reason, Value, and Respect: Kantian Themes from the Philosophy of Thomas E. Hill, Jr.,. pp. 42-69.
    For Kant and Hill, self-respect is a morally central and morally powerful concern. Both have also had some things to say in moral praise of humility and in condemnation of arrogance, a trait widely regarded as the vice to which the virtue of humility is the prevention and cure. Arrogance can easily be seen as a failure to respect both other people and oneself. It might be thought, however, that humility and self-respect are in tension, if not at odds with (...)
     
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  15. Arrogance, Self-Respect and Personhood.Robin S. Dillon - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (5-6):101-126.
    This essay aims to show that arrogance corrupts the very qualities that make persons persons. The corruption is subtle but profound, and the key to understanding it lies in understanding the connections between different kinds of arrogance, self-respect, respect for others and personhood. Making these connections clear is the second aim of this essay. It will build on Kant's claim that self-respect is central to living our human lives as persons and that arrogance is, at its core, the failure to (...)
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  16. Kant on Arrogance and Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2003 - In Cheshire Calhoun (ed.), Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. pp. 191-216.
    Arrogance is traditionally regarded as among the worst of human vices. Kant’s discussion of one kind of arrogance as a violation of the categorical moral duty to respect other persons gives familiar support for this view. However, I argue that what Kant says about the ways in which another kind of arrogance is opposed to different kinds of self-respect reveals how profoundly vicious arrogance can be. As a failure of self-respect, arrogance is the Ur-Vice that corrupts moral agency and rational (...)
     
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  17. Respect: A Philosophical Perspective.Robin S. Dillon - 2007 - Gruppendynamik Und Organisationsberatung 2 (38):201-212.
     
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  18. Critical Character Theory: Toward a Feminist Theory of ‘Vice’.Robin S. Dillon - 2012 - In Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 83-114.
    Theorizing about human character to understand what it is to be a morally good person and how being morally good relates to acting rightly and living well has always been a central concern of moral philosophy. Traditional virtue theory, however, neglects two significant matters. The first is the sociopolitical dimensions of character: how character is shaped by, supports, and resists domination and subordination. While feminist ethics has begun to theorize virtue in relation to oppression, it shares with traditional virtue theory (...)
     
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  19. “Self-Respect, Arrogance, and Power: A Feminist Perspective,”.Robin S. Dillon - 2021 - In Richard Dean and Oliver Sensen (ed.), Respect for Persons. Oxford University Press.
    In many cultures arrogance is regarded as a serious vice and a cause of numerous social ills. Although its badness is typically thought to lie in its harmful consequences for other persons and things, I draw on Kant to argue that what makes it a vice is first and foremost the failure to respect oneself. But arrogance is not only a problem inside individuals. Drawing on feminist insights I argue that it is a systemic problem constructed in and reinforcing unjust (...)
     
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  20. Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (eds.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  21. Arrogance.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International encyclopedia of Ethics.
     
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  22. Feminist Virtue Ethics.Robin S. Dillon - 2017 - In Serene Khader Ann Garry (ed.), Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy. pp. 568-678.
     
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  23. Respect for Persons.Robin S. Dillon - 2020 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
     
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  24. 'What’s a Woman Worth? What’s Life Worth? Without Self-Respect?’: On the Value of Evaluative Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2004 - In Margaret Walker and Peggy DesAutels (ed.), Minds, Hearts, and Morality: Feminist Essays in Moral Psychology. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 47-68.
    In recent years philosophers have done impressive work explicating the nature and moral importance of a kind of self-respect Darwall calls “recognition self-respect,” which involves valuing oneself as the moral equal of every other person, regarding oneself as having basic moral rights and a legitimate claim to respectful treatment from other people just in virtue of being a person, and being unwilling to stand for having one’s rights violated or being treated as something less than a person. It is generally (...)
     
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  25. Feminist Approaches to Virtue Ethics.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - In Nancy E. Snow (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Virtue. pp. 377-397.
     
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  26. “Humility and Self-Respect: Kantian and Feminist Perspectives”.Robin S. Dillon - 2021 - In Michael P. Lynch Mark Alfano (ed.), Routledge Handbook on the Philosophy of Humility. Routledge. pp. 59-71.
    For Kant and for feminists, self-respect is a morally central and morally powerful concern. In this paper I focus on some questions about the relation of self-respect to two other stances toward the self, humility and arrogance. Just as arrogance is usually treated as a serious vice, so humility is widely regarded as an important virtue. Indeed, it is supposed to be the virtue that opposes arrogance, keeping it in check or preventing it from developing in the first place. I’ve (...)
     
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  27.  3
    Own-Age Bias in Face-Name Associations: Evidence From Memory and Visual Attention in Younger and Older Adults.Carla M. Strickland-Hughes, Kaitlyn E. Dillon, Robin L. West & Natalie C. Ebner - 2020 - Cognition 200:104253.
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  28.  8
    The Ethics of Need: Agency, Dignity, and Obligation, Sarah Clark Miller. [REVIEW]Robin S. Dillon - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (6):798-801.
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  29.  15
    Platonic Theories of Prayer. Edited by John Dillon and Andrei Timotin. Pp. Ix, 228, Leiden: Brill, 2016, €104.00/$135.00. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (6):962-963.
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  30.  11
    Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. Edited by John Dillon and Luc Brisson. Pp. X, 430, Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag, €55.00. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (1):163-164.
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  31. Epistemic Corruption and Social Oppression.Ian James Kidd - forthcoming - In Ian James Kidd, Quassim Cassam & Heather Battaly (eds.), Vice Epistemology. London: Routledge.
    I offer a working analysis of the concept of 'epistemic corruption', then explain how it can help us to understand the relations between epistemic vices and social oppression, and use this to motivate a style of vice epistemology, inspired by the work of Robin Dillon, that I call critical character epistemology.
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  32. Forgivingness, Pessimism, and Environmental Citizenship.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):29-42.
    Our attitudes toward human culpability for environmental problems have moral and emotional import, influencing our basic capacities for believing cooperative action and environmental repair are even possible. In this paper, I suggest that having the virtue of forgivingness as a response to environmental harm is generally good for moral character, preserving us from morally risky varieties of pessimism and despair. I define forgivingness as a forward-looking disposition based on Robin Dillon’s conception of preservative forgiveness, a preparation to be (...)
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  33.  66
    What’s So Bad About Self-Sacrifice?: Immolation, Abnegation, Effacement, and Donation in Ethics.Kalynne Hackney Pudner - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:241-250.
    A persistent worry in the ethical literature on care and empathy is that the agent is prone to self-sacrifice by the requisite state of engrossment in or engagement of the other. Addressing this worry particularly as expressed in feminist philosophy, I argue that the standard conceptions of self-sacrifice conflate four distinct relations of the self to its autonomous will: self-immolation (destroying one’s own autonomy), self-abnegation (disowning one’s autonomy), self-effacement (devaluing one’s autonomy) and self-donation (dedicating one’s autonomy). The latter, far from (...)
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  34.  3
    Traditions of Platonism: Essays in Honour of John Dillon.John M. Dillon - 1999 - Ashgate.
    The breadth and depth of the Platonic tradition, from Antiquity through to the early Middle Ages, is evidenced by the studies gathered in this volume, written by an international team of contributors in honour of John Dillon. The first papers, on Plato, include a discussion of the problem of evil and of the theme of love n the Symposium. There follows a section of the Middle-Platonists, dealing with how this tradition adapted and developed themes such as the world-soul as (...)
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  35.  5
    An Interview with Robin Celikates.Robin Celikates, Tomás Guerrero-Jaramillo & Polina Whitehouse - 2021 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 28:157-170.
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  36.  73
    Human-Sled Dog Relations: What Can We Learn From the Stories and Experiences of Mushers?Gail Kuhl - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (1):22-37.
    In this qualitative study, the elements and quality of musher-sled dog relationships were investigated. In-depth interviews with a narrative design were conducted with eight mushers from northern Minnesota and northwestern Ontario. The mushers were asked to contribute ideas by sharing stories and experiences of working with dogs, as well as art or photographs. While all the participants had their own ideas about musher-sled dog relationships, six themes emerged. The mushers stated the importance of getting to know the dogs, their respect (...)
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  37.  47
    Identity and the Composite Christ: An Incarnational Dilemma: ROBIN LE POIDEVIN.Robin Le Poidevin - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (2):167-186.
    One way of understanding the reduplicative formula ‘Christ is, qua God, omniscient, but qua man, limited in knowledge’ is to take the occurrences of the ‘ qua ’ locution as picking out different parts of Christ: a divine part and a human part. But this view of Christ as a composite being runs into paradox when combined with the orthodox understanding of the Incarnation, according to which Christ is identical to the second person of the Trinity. In response, we have (...)
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  38.  53
    John Stuart Mill and Royal India: Robin J. Moore.Robin J. Moore - 1991 - Utilitas 3 (1):85-106.
    Though John Stuart Mill's long employment by the East India Company did not limit him to drafting despatches on relations with the princely states, that activity must form the centrepiece of any satisfactory study of his Indian career. As yet the activity has scarcely been glimpsed. It produced, on average, about a draft a week, which he listed in his own hand. He subsequently struck out items that he sought to disown in consequence of substantial revisions made by the Company's (...)
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  39.  20
    Chance and Longevity. From Robin Holliday.Robin Holiday - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (5):465-466.
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  40. Time and the Static Image: Robin Le Poidevin.Robin Le Poidevin - 1997 - Philosophy 72 (280):175-188.
    Photographs, paintings, rigid sculptures: all these provide examples of static images. It is true that they change—photographs fade, paintings darken and sculptures crumble—but what change they undergo is irrelevant to their representational content. A static image is one that represents by virtue of properties which remain largely unchanged throughout its existence. Because of this defining feature, according to a long tradition in aesthetics, a static image can only represent an instantaneous moment, or to be more exact the state of affairs (...)
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  41.  26
    Comment: Rationality, Hedonism, and the Case for Paternalistic Intervention: Robin West.Robin West - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (2):125-131.
    Let us take, as a starting assumption, the Benthamic understanding of the point of law: We should make laws that will increase the overall happiness of the people whose lives are affected by them. But how should we go about doing that? And more particularly, what role, if any, should our held desires play in the task of ascertaining the content of our happiness? And when, if ever, should we defer to the desires of the affected masses, and when should (...)
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  42. Biocentric Consequentialism, Pluralism, and ‘The Minimax Implication’: A Reply to Alan Carter: Robin Attfield.Robin Attfield - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (1):76-91.
    Alan Carter's recent review in Mind of my Ethics of the Global Environment combines praise of biocentric consequentialism with criticisms that it could advocate both minimal satisfaction of human needs and the extinction of ‘inessential species’ for the sake of generating extra people; Carter also maintains that as a monistic theory it is predictably inadequate to cover the full range of ethical issues, since only a pluralistic theory has this capacity. In this reply, I explain how the counter-intuitive implications of (...)
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  43. Ressentiment, Revenge, and Punishment: Origins of the Nietzschean Critique: Robin Small.Robin Small - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):39-58.
    Nietzsche's thinking on justice and punishment explores the motives and forces which lie behind moral concepts and social institutions. His dialogue with several writers of his time is discussed here. Eugen Dühring had argued that a natural feeling of ressentiment against those who have harmed us is the source of the concept of injustice, so that punishment, even in its most impersonal form, is always a form of revenge. In attacking this theory, Nietzsche developed his own powerful critique of moral (...)
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  44. Escaping the Natural Attitude About Gender.Robin Dembroff - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (3):983-1003.
    Alex Byrne’s article, “Are Women Adult Human Females?”, asks a question that Byrne treats as nearly rhetorical. Byrne’s answer is, ‘clearly, yes’. Moreover, Byrne claims, 'woman' is a biological category that does not admit of any interpretation as (also) a social category. It is important to respond to Byrne’s argument, but mostly because it is paradigmatic of a wider phenomenon. The slogan “women are adult human females” is a political slogan championed by anti-trans activists, appearing on billboards, pamphlets, and anti-trans (...)
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  45.  35
    Realism and Progress: Why Scientists Should Be Realists: Robin Findlay Hendry.Robin Findlay Hendry - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:53-72.
    For as long as realists and instrumentalists have disagreed, partisans of both sides have pointed in argument to the actions and sayings of scientists. Realists in particular have often drawn comfort from the literal understanding given even to very theoretical propositions by many of those who are paid to deploy them. The scientists' realism, according to the realist, is not an idle commitment: a literal understanding of past and present theories and concepts underwrites their employment in the construction of new (...)
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  46.  46
    On the Possibility of Rational Dilemmas: An Axiomatic Approach: Robin P. Cubitt.Robin P. Cubitt - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):1-23.
    In this paper, I address two connected issues that arise when one considers a rational agent facing a decision problem. One is whether or not the agent may find that the dictates of rationality are such that they cannot all be followed. For example, one may ask whether or not the requirements on the agent's actions imposed by rationality can conflict in an irreconcilable way, making it impossible to satisfy all of them. Put differently, one may ask whether or not (...)
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  47. Real Talk on the Metaphysics of Gender.Robin Dembroff - 2018 - Philosophical Topics 46 (2):21-50.
    Gender classifications often are controversial. These controversies typically focus on whether gender classifications align with facts about gender kind membership: Could someone really be nonbinary? Is Chris Mosier really a man? I think this is a bad approach. Consider the possibility of ontological oppression, which arises when social kinds operating in a context unjustly constrain the behaviors, concepts, or affect of certain groups. Gender kinds operating in dominant contexts, I argue, oppress trans and nonbinary persons in this way: they marginalize (...)
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  48.  49
    On Quantifying Into Epistemic Contexts.Robert C. Sleigh - 1967 - Noûs 1 (1):23-31.
  49.  61
    Leibniz on the Two Great Principles of All Our Reasonings.R. C. Sleigh - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):193-216.
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  50.  24
    The Lord is God: There is No Other: Robin Attfield.Robin Attfield - 1977 - Religious Studies 13 (1):73-84.
    As I shall be taking issue with Michael Durrant for the bulk of this paper, it is appropriate, as well as a good way to start, to register my endorsement of his arguments in chapter 4 of The Logical Status of God l for the conclusion that sentences about God are typically used to express propositions, and that acts of thanksgiving and petition to God presuppose that some such propositions are true. The present paper is therefore a continuation of Mr (...)
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