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  1.  86
    A Model of Saccade Generation Based on Parallel Processing and Competitive Inhibition.John M. Findlay & Robin Walker - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):661-674.
    During active vision, the eyes continually scan the visual environment using saccadic scanning movements. This target article presents an information processing model for the control of these movements, with some close parallels to established physiological processes in the oculomotor system. Two separate pathways are concerned with the spatial and the temporal programming of the movement. In the temporal pathway there is spatially distributed coding and the saccade target is selected from a Both pathways descend through a hierarchy of levels, the (...)
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  2.  26
    How Are Saccades Generated?John M. Findlay & Robin Walker - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):706-713.
    Our target article discussed how emerging knowledge of the physiological processes involved in the control of saccadic eye movements provided the basis for a functional framework in which to understand the programming of such movements. The commentators raised many interesting issues in their varied responses that ranged from detailed discussion of the physiological substrate through issues of saccade control in reading. New evidence at the physiological level demonstrates that some elaborations are needed to the framework we proposed. Most clearly, the (...)
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    Pathological Completion: The Blind Leading the Mind?Robin Walker & Jason B. Mattingley - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):778-779.
    The taxonomy proposed by Pessoa et al. should be extended to include “pathological” completion phenomena in patients with unilateral brain damage. Patients with visual field defects (hemianopias) may “complete” whole figures, while patients with parietal lobe damage may “complete” partial figures. We argue that the former may be consistent with the brain “filling-in” information, and the latter may be consistent with the brain ignoring the absence of information.
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