Results for 'Rochelle Gelman'

213 found
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  1. Beyond Syntax: The Influence of Conversational Constraints on Speech Modifications.Marilyn Shatz & Rochelle Gelman - 1977 - In Catherine E. Snow & Charles A. Ferguson (eds.), Talking to Children. Cambridge University Press. pp. 189--198.
     
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  2. CR Gallistel Rochel Gelman.Rochel Gelman - 2005 - In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 559.
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  3.  18
    Categories and Induction in Young Children.Susan A. Gelman & Ellen M. Markman - 1986 - Cognition 23 (3):183-209.
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  4.  29
    Insides and Essences: Early Understandings of the Non- Obvious.Susan A. Gelman & Henry M. Wellman - 1991 - Cognition 38 (3):213-244.
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  5.  49
    First Principles Organize Attention to and Learning About Relevant Data: Number and the Animate‐Inanimate Distinction as Examples.Rochel Gelman - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):79-106.
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  6.  72
    Psychological Essentialism in Children.S. A. Gelman - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):404-409.
  7.  87
    Number and Language: How Are They Related?Rochel Gelman & Brian Butterworth - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):6-10.
  8.  9
    Structural Constraints on Cognitive Development: Introduction to a Special Issue of Cognitive Science.Rochel Gelman - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):3-9.
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  9.  35
    How Biological is Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman & Lawrence A. Hirschfeld - 1999 - In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. MIT Press. pp. 403--446.
  10.  63
    Early Word-Learning Entails Reference, Not Merely Associations.Sandra R. Waxman & Susan A. Gelman - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):258-263.
  11.  24
    Islamophobia, Feminism and the Politics of Critique.Rochelle Terman - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (2):77-102.
  12.  65
    Artifacts and Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):449-463.
    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic (...)
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  13.  38
    So It Is, So It Shall Be: Group Regularities License Children's Prescriptive Judgments.Steven O. Roberts, Susan A. Gelman & Arnold K. Ho - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S3).
    When do descriptive regularities become prescriptive norms? We examined children's and adults' use of group regularities to make prescriptive judgments, employing novel groups that engaged in morally neutral behaviors. Participants were introduced to conforming or non-conforming individuals. Children negatively evaluated non-conformity, with negative evaluations declining with age. These effects were replicable across competitive and cooperative intergroup contexts and stemmed from reasoning about group regularities rather than reasoning about individual regularities. These data provide new insights into children's group concepts and have (...)
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  14.  35
    A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of Generic Noun Phrases in English and Mandarin.Susan A. Gelman & Twila Tardif - 1998 - Cognition 66 (3):215-248.
    Generic noun phrases (e.g. 'bats live in caves') provide a window onto human concepts. They refer to categories as 'kinds rather than as sets of individuals. Although kind concepts are often assumed to be universal, generic expression varies considerably across languages. For example, marking of generics is less obligatory and overt in Mandarin than in English. How do universal conceptual biases interact with language-specific differences in how generics are conveyed? In three studies, we examined adults' generics in English and Mandarin (...)
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  15.  10
    Shape and Representational Status in Children's Early Naming.Susan A. Gelman & Karen S. Ebeling - 1998 - Cognition 66 (2):B35-B47.
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  16.  40
    Using Ethical Reasoning to Amplify the Reach and Resonance of Professional Codes of Conduct in Training Big Data Scientists.Rochelle E. Tractenberg, Andrew J. Russell, Gregory J. Morgan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Jeff Collmann, Lee Vinsel, Michael Steinmann & Lisa M. Dolling - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1485-1507.
    The use of Big Data—however the term is defined—involves a wide array of issues and stakeholders, thereby increasing numbers of complex decisions around issues including data acquisition, use, and sharing. Big Data is becoming a significant component of practice in an ever-increasing range of disciplines; however, since it is not a coherent “discipline” itself, specific codes of conduct for Big Data users and researchers do not exist. While many institutions have created, or will create, training opportunities to prepare people to (...)
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  17. Differences in the Evaluation of Generic Statements About Human and Non‐Human Categories.Arber Tasimi, Susan Gelman, Andrei Cimpian & Joshua Knobe - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1934-1957.
    Generic statements express generalizations about categories. Current theories suggest that people should be especially inclined to accept generics that involve threatening information. However, previous tests of this claim have focused on generics about non-human categories, which raises the question of whether this effect applies as readily to human categories. In Experiment 1, adults were more likely to accept generics involving a threatening property for artifacts, but this negativity bias did not also apply to human categories. Experiment 2 examined an alternative (...)
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  18.  20
    Preschoolers' Counting: Principles Before Skill.Rochel Gelman & Elizabeth Meck - 1983 - Cognition 13 (3):343-359.
  19.  6
    Don't Characterize Replications as Successes or Failures.Andrew Gelman - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  20.  42
    Preverbal and Verbal Counting and Computation.C. R. Gallistel & Rochel Gelman - 1992 - Cognition 44 (1-2):43-74.
  21.  19
    Questions for Future Research.Rochel Gelman & Brian Butterworth - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):6-10.
  22.  39
    Tracking the Actions and Possessions of Agents.Susan A. Gelman, Nicholaus S. Noles & Sarah Stilwell - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):599-614.
    We propose that there is a powerful human disposition to track the actions and possessions of agents. In two experiments, 3-year-olds and adults viewed sets of objects, learned a new fact about one of the objects in each set , and were queried about either the taught fact or an unrelated dimension immediately after a spatiotemporal transformation, and after a delay. Adults uniformly tracked object identity under all conditions, whereas children tracked identity more when taught ownership versus labeling information, and (...)
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  23.  10
    Beyond and Around Mandatory Reporting in Nursing Practice: Interrupting a Series of Deferrals.Rochelle Einboden, Trudy Rudge & Colleen Varcoe - 2019 - Nursing Inquiry 26 (2):e12285.
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  24.  45
    Non-Verbal Numerical Cognition: From Reals to Integers.C. R. Gallistel & Rochel Gelman - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):59-65.
  25.  17
    You Get What You Need: An Examination of Purpose‐Based Inheritance Reasoning in Undergraduates, Preschoolers, and Biological Experts.Elizabeth A. Ware & Susan A. Gelman - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (2):197-243.
    This set of seven experiments examines reasoning about the inheritance and acquisition of physical properties in preschoolers, undergraduates, and biology experts. Participants (N = 390) received adoption vignettes in which a baby animal was born to one parent but raised by a biologically unrelated parent, and they judged whether the offspring would have the same property as the birth or rearing parent. For each vignette, the animal parents had contrasting values on a physical property dimension (e.g., the birth parent had (...)
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  26.  16
    History and Essence in Human Cognition.Susan A. Gelman, Meredith A. Meyer & Nicholaus S. Noles - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):142 - 143.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) provide compelling evidence that sensitivity to context, history, and design stance are crucial to theories of art appreciation. We ask how these ideas relate to broader aspects of human cognition. Further open questions concern how psychological essentialism contributes to art appreciation and how essentialism regarding created artifacts (such as art) differs from essentialism in other domains.
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  27.  22
    Must a World Government Violate the Right to Exit?Rochelle DuFord - 2017 - Ethics and Global Politics 10 (1):19-36.
  28.  51
    Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments.Arber Tasimi & Susan A. Gelman - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S3).
    Although traditional economic models posit that money is fungible, psychological research abounds with examples that deviate from this assumption. Across eight experiments, we provide evidence that people construe physical currency as carrying traces of its moral history. In Experiments 1 and 2, people report being less likely to want money with negative moral history. Experiments 3–5 provide evidence against an alternative account that people's judgments merely reflect beliefs about the consequences of accepting stolen money rather than moral sensitivity. Experiment 6 (...)
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  29.  36
    Image, Measure, Figure: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Nursing Practices That Develop Children.Rochelle Einboden, Trudy Rudge & Colleen Varcoe - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (3):212-222.
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  30.  8
    Role of Learning in Cognitive Development.Rochel Gelman & Joan Lucariello - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
  31. The Generative Basis of Natural Number Concepts.Alan M. Leslie, Rochel Gelman & C. R. Gallistel - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (6):213-218.
    Number concepts must support arithmetic inference. Using this principle, it can be argued that the integer concept of exactly ONE is a necessary part of the psychological foundations of number, as is the notion of the exact equality - that is, perfect substitutability. The inability to support reasoning involving exact equality is a shortcoming in current theories about the development of numerical reasoning. A simple innate basis for the natural number concepts can be proposed that embodies the arithmetic principle, supports (...)
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  32.  58
    Quantified Statements Are Recalled as Generics: Evidence From Preschool Children and Adults.Sarah-Jane Leslie & Susan Gelman - 2012 - Cognitive Psychology 64 (186):214.
  33.  13
    Young Children’s Preference for Unique Owned Objects.Susan A. Gelman & Natalie S. Davidson - 2016 - Cognition 155:146-154.
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  34.  25
    Response to Sloutsky: Taking Development Seriously: Theories Cannot Emerge From Associations Alone.Susan A. Gelman & Sandra R. Waxman - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (8):332-333.
  35.  9
    Sample Diversity and Premise Typicality in Inductive Reasoning: Evidence for Developmental Change.Marjorie Rhodes, Daniel Brickman & Susan A. Gelman - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):543-556.
  36. Generic Noun Phrases in English and Mandarin: An Examination of Child-Directed Speech.S. A. Gelman & T. Z. Tardif - 1998 - Cognition 66:215-248.
     
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  37.  9
    Bewitchment, Biology, or Both: The Co-Existence of Natural and Supernatural Explanatory Frameworks Across Development.Cristine H. Legare & Susan A. Gelman - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (4):607-642.
  38.  18
    Does Quantum Uncertainty Have a Place in Everyday Applied Statistics?Andrew Gelman & Michael Betancourt - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):285-285.
  39.  7
    Structural Constraints on Cognitive Development: Introduction to a Special Issue of Cognitive Science.R. Gelman - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):3-9.
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  40.  75
    ‘Faultless’ Ignorance: Strengths and Limitations of Epistemic Definitions of Confabulation.Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle E. Cox - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  41.  22
    The Case for Continuity.Rochel Gelman - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):127-128.
    This article defends a continuity position. Infants can abstract numerosity and young preschool children do respond appropriately to tasks that tap their ability to use a count and cardinal value and/or arithmetic principles. Active use of a nonverbal domain of arithmetic serves to enable the child to find relevant data to build knowledge about the language and use rules of numerosity and quantity.
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  42.  10
    Different Kinds of Concepts and Different Kinds of Words: What Words Do for Human Cognition.Sandra Waxman & Susan Gelman - 2010 - In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oxford University Press. pp. 101--130.
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  43.  33
    Numerical Abstraction by Human Infants.Prentice Starkey, Elizabeth S. Spelke & Rochel Gelman - 1990 - Cognition 36 (2):97-127.
  44.  15
    Picasso Paintings, Moon Rocks, and Hand-Written Beatles Lyrics: Adults' Evaluations of Authentic Objects.Brandy Frazier, Susan Gelman, Bruce Hood & Alice Wilson - 2009 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 9 (1-2):1-14.
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  45.  24
    Two Insights About Naming in the Preschool Child.Susan A. Gelman - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 198--215.
    This chapter examines associationist models of cognitive development, focusing on the development of naming in young children — the process by which young children learn of construct the meanings of words and concepts. It presents two early-emerging insights that children possess about the nature of naming. These insights are: essentialism: certain words map onto nonobvious, underlying causal features, and genericity: certain expressions map onto generic kinds as opposed to particular instances. The chapter discusses empirical studies with preschool children to support (...)
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  46.  24
    Children's Developing Intuitions About the Truth Conditions and Implications of Novel Generics Versus Quantified Statements.Amanda C. Brandone, Susan A. Gelman & Jenna Hedglen - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (4):711-738.
    Generic statements express generalizations about categories and present a unique semantic profile that is distinct from quantified statements. This paper reports two studies examining the development of children's intuitions about the semantics of generics and how they differ from statements quantified by all, most, and some. Results reveal that, like adults, preschoolers recognize that generics have flexible truth conditions and are capable of representing a wide range of prevalence levels; and interpret novel generics as having near-universal prevalence implications. Results further (...)
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  47.  21
    Causal Status Effect in Children's Categorization.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Susan A. Gelman, Jennifer A. Amsterlaw, Jill Hohenstein & Charles W. Kalish - 2000 - Cognition 76 (2):B35-B43.
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  48.  8
    Preschoolers’ Use of Spatiotemporal History, Appearance, and Proper Name in Determining Individual Identity.Grant Gutheil, Susan A. Gelman, Eileen Klein, Katherine Michos & Kara Kelaita - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):366-380.
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  49.  23
    Care, Domination, and Representation.Rochelle Green, Bonnie Mann & Amy Story - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2-3):177-195.
    Some photographs, more than mere representations, are ethical commands, calling us to respond to human suffering. Photos of Abu Graib, like iconic photos of Vietnam, called us to a posture of care, and confronted us with ourselves, with our national domination, and with how we represent ourselves to the world. This article, drawing on Kittay (1999), Butler (2004), and Levinas (1961, 1974, 1985), attempts to untangle the relation among care, domination, and representation. Implications for philosophers and journalists are suggested.
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  50.  22
    Distributed Cognition in Sports Teams: Explaining Successful and Expert Performance.Kellie Williamson & Rochelle Cox - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (6):1-15.
    In this article we use a hybrid methodology to better understand the skilful performance of sports teams as an exemplar of distributed cognition. We highlight key differences between a team of individual experts and an expert team, and outline the kinds of shared characteristics likely to be found in an expert team. We focus on the way that shared knowledge contributes to expert team performance. In particular, we suggest that certain kinds of shared knowledge and shared skill, potentially developed through (...)
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