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Rod MacRae [3]Rod J. MacRae [2]
  1.  36
    Linking Future Population Food Requirements for Health with Local Production in Waterloo Region, Canada.Ellen Desjardins, Rod MacRae & Theresa Schumilas - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):129-140.
    Regional planning for improved agricultural capacity to supply produce, legumes, and whole grains has the potential to improve population health as well as the local food economy. This case study of Waterloo Region (WR), Canada, had two objectives. First, we estimate the quantity of locally grown vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains needed to help meet the Region of Waterloo population’s optimal nutritional requirements currently and in 2026. Secondly, we estimate how much of these healthy food requirements for the WR (...)
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  2.  25
    Not Just What, but How: Creating Agricultural Sustainability and Food Security by Changing Canada's Agricultural Policy Making Process. [REVIEW]Rod MacRae - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):187-202.
    Agriculture has been enormously productive in recent decades. The main problem is that fragmentation of issues, knowledge, and responsibilities has hidden the costs associated with this success. These are mainly environmental, social, and health costs, which have been assigned to other ministries, with their own histories unconnected to agriculture. Now that agricultural policy has achieved its success, its costs are becoming apparent. The current system is preoccupied with traditional views of competitiveness and efficiency. Policies, programs, and regulations are organized to (...)
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  3.  20
    Federal Regulation of Local and Sustainable Food Claims in Canada: A Case Study of Local Food Plus. [REVIEW]Fiona N. Louden & Rod J. MacRae - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):177-188.
    Interest in purchasing local food from suppliers who follow sustainable practices is growing in Canada. Such suppliers wish to have their products recognized in the market so that price premiums might be received, and new markets developed. In response, the organization Local Food Plus (LFP) developed standards and a certification process to authenticate local and sustainable claims. LFP provides certification seals, and labeling provisions for qualifying producers and processors. However, given pre-existing national food labeling rules, it is not evident that (...)
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  4.  67
    Legitimacy & Canadian Farm Animal Welfare Standards Development: The Case of the National Farm Animal Care Council. [REVIEW]Andrea Bradley & Rod MacRae - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):19-47.
    Awareness of farm animal welfare issues is growing in Canada, as part of a larger food movement. The baseline Canadian standards for farm animal welfare—the Recommended Codes of Practice for the Care and Handling of Farm Animals—are up for revision. The success of these standards will depend in part on perceived legitimacy, which helps determine whether voluntary code systems are adopted, implemented, and accepted by target audiences. In the context of the Codes, legitimacy will also hinge on whether the standards-developers (...)
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  5.  27
    Developing Sustainable Agriculture Education in Canada.Stuart B. Hill & Rod J. MacRae - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):92-95.
    In a number of surveys, Canadian farmers have found the absence of information to be a major obstacle to the development of sustainable agriculture. The traditional sources of information for farmers have been unable to provide them with suitable information. One reason for this deficiency is the absence of suitable training for agriculture professionals. The details of a newly created course designed to address these problems at the Faculty of Agriculture of McGill University are provided, and some suggestions made about (...)
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