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  1. Causation and Evidence-Based Practive - an Ontological Review.Roger Kerry, Thor Eirik Eriksen, Svein Anders Noer Lie, Stephen D. Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1006-1012.
    We claim that if a complete philosophy of evidence-based practice is intended, then attention to the nature of causation in health science is necessary. We identify how health science currently conceptualises causation by the way it prioritises some research methods over others. We then show how the current understanding of what causation is serves to constrain scientific progress. An alternative account of causation is offered. This is one of dispositionalism. We claim that by understanding causation from a dispositionalist stance, many (...)
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  2. At the Borders of Medical Reasoning: Aetiological and Ontological Challenges of Medically Unexplained Symptoms.Thor Eirik Eriksen, Roger Kerry, Stephen Mumford, Svein Anders Noer Lie & Rani Lill Anjum - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:11.
    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) remain recalcitrant to the medical profession, proving less suitable for homogenic treatment with respect to their aetiology, taxonomy and diagnosis. While the majority of existing medical research methods are designed for large scale population data and sufficiently homogenous groups, MUS are characterised by their heterogenic and complex nature. As a result, MUS seem to resist medical scrutiny in a way that other conditions do not. This paper approaches the problem of MUS from a philosophical point of (...)
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    Evidence Based on What?Rani Lill Anjum, Roger Kerry & Stephen D. Mumford - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (6):E11-E12.
  4.  12
    The Guidelines Challenge-Philosophy, Practice, Policy.Rani Lill Anjum, Samantha Copeland, Roger Kerry & Elena Rocca - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1120-1126.
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    Causation in Evidence-Based Medicine: In Reply to Strand and Parkkinen.Roger Kerry, Thor E. Eriksen, Svein A. Noer Lie, Stephen Mumford & Rani L. Anjum - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):985-987.
    Strand and Parkkinen criticize our dispositional account of causation in evidence‐based medicine for failing to provide a proper epistemology of causal knowledge. In particular, they claim that we do not explain how causal inferences should be drawn. In response, we point out that dispositionalism does indeed have an account of the epistemology of causation, including counterfactual dependence, intervention, prediction and clinical decision. Furthermore, we argue that this is an epistemology that fits better with the known fallibility of even our best‐informed (...)
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    Problematic Placebos in Physical Therapy Trials.Matthew Maddocks, Roger Kerry, Andrew Turner & Jeremy Howick - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):598-602.
    The function of a placebo control in a randomised trial is to permit blinding and reduce risk of bias. Adopting Grűnbaum’s definitional scheme of a placebo, all treatments must be viewed as packages consisting of characteristic and incidental features. An adequate placebo for an experimental treatment contains none of the characteristic features, all of the incidental features, and nothing more. For drug treatments, characteristic features can be readily identified, isolated, and separated. By contrast, physical therapy treatments often involve features such (...)
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    Time, Space and Form: Necessary for Causation in Health, Disease and Intervention?David W. Evans, Nicholas Lucas & Roger Kerry - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):207-213.
    Sir Austin Bradford Hill’s ‘aspects of causation’ represent some of the most influential thoughts on the subject of proximate causation in health and disease. Hill compiled a list of features that, when present and known, indicate an increasing likelihood that exposure to a factor causes—or contributes to the causation of—a disease. The items of Hill’s list were not labelled ‘criteria’, as this would have inferred every item being necessary for causation. Hence, criteria that are necessary for causation in health, disease (...)
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    Analysis of Scientific Truth Status in Controlled Rehabilitation Trials.Roger Kerry, Aurélien Madouasse, Antony Arthur & Stephen D. Mumford - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):617-625.
  9.  15
    The Form of Causation in Health, Disease and Intervention: Biopsychosocial Dispositionalism, Conserved Quantity Transfers and Dualist Mechanistic Chains.David W. Evans, Nicholas Lucas & Roger Kerry - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):353-363.
    Causation is important when considering: how an organism maintains health; why disease arises in a healthy person; and, how one may intervene to change the course of a disease. This paper explores the form of causative relationships in health, disease and intervention, with particular regard to the pathological and biopsychosocial models. Consistent with the philosophical view of dispositionalism, we believe that objects are the fundamental relata of causation. By accepting the broad scope of the biopsychosocial model, we argue that psychological (...)
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  10. The Form of Causation in Health, Disease and Intervention: Biopsychosocial Dispositionalism, Conserved Quantity Transfers and Dualist Mechanistic Chains.David W. Evans, Nicholas Lucas & Roger Kerry - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy: A European Journal 20 (3):353-363.
    Causation is important when considering how an organism maintains health, why disease arises in a healthy person, and how one may intervene to change the course of a disease. This paper explores the form of causative relationships in health, disease and intervention, with particular regard to the pathological and biopsychosocial models. Consistent with the philosophical view of dispositionalism, we believe that objects are the fundamental relata of causation. By accepting the broad scope of the biopsychosocial model, we argue that psychological (...)
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