17 found
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  1.  15
    Sir Robert Sibbald, Kt, The Royal Society of Scotland and the Origins of the Scottish Enlightenment.Roger L. Emerson - 1988 - Annals of Science 45 (1):41-72.
    This paper shows that in late seventeenth-century Scotland there existed a sizeable virtuoso community whose leaders were abreast of European developments in philosophy, history and science. Moreover, by c. 1700, Sir Robert Sibbald was attempting to organize a learned society modelled upon those he knew in Europe and upon London's Royal Society. The interests of the virtuosi and their attempts to institutionalize their pursuits laid much of the ground work for the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Scotland which Sir (...)
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  2.  3
    The Scientific Interests of Archibald Campbell, 1st Earl of Ilay and 3rd Duke of Argyll.Roger L. Emerson - 2002 - Annals of Science 59 (1):21-56.
    Amateur scientists were important in the science of the eighteenth century as patrons, investors in talent and new equipment, as the maintainers of gardens and libraries, and, occasionally, as men who could and did make discoveries or significant innovations. The article shows that the 3rd Duke of Argyll was one of these men. He was also much more. Ilay's interests in science, because of his important political position in Scotland, touched not only his immediate friends but helped to reshape Scottish (...)
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  3. Science and Moral Philosophy in the Scottish Enlightenment.Roger L. Emerson - 1990 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. pp. 11--36.
  4.  22
    Essays on David Hume, Medical Men, and the Scottish Enlightenment: Industry, Knowledge, and Humanity.Roger L. Emerson - 2008 - Ashgate.
    The world in which the Scottish Enlightenment took shape -- Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll (1682-1761) : patronage and the creation of the Scottish Enlightenment -- How many Scots were enlightened? -- What did eighteenth-century Scottish students read? -- Our excellent and never to be forgotten friend : David Hume (26 April 1711- 25 August 1776) -- Hume's intellectual development : part II, 1711-1762 -- Hume's histories -- Hume's economics -- Numbering the medics -- Numbers and money -- Who (...)
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  5.  11
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh 1737–1747.Roger L. Emerson - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (2):154-191.
    Several essays, articles, and papers have appeared during the last fifteen years which have shed light on the place and function of science in the intellectual life of eighteenth-century Scotland. Some have concentrated on ideological factors such as the increasing concerns with polite culture, improvement, and the reaction of the Scottish élite to the Act of Union. Others have noted the roles of Jacobites and Whigs in the production of a culture which was unique to Scotland. The generalist educational ideals (...)
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  6.  18
    The Scottish Enlightenment and the End of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh.Roger L. Emerson - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (1):33-66.
    The story of the end of the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh in 1783, is linked with that of the founding of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and the Royal Society of Edinburgh , both of which were given Royal Charters sealed on 6 May 1783. It is a story which has been admirably told by Steven Shapin. He persuasively argued that the P.S.E. was a casualty of bitter quarrels rooted in local Edinburgh politics, in personal animosities and in disputes (...)
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  7.  6
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh 1748–1768.Roger L. Emerson - 1981 - British Journal for the History of Science 14 (2):133-176.
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh which had flourished for a few years after 1738 was as good as dead in 1748. Lord Morton, its President, now lived most of the time in London whence he wrote to Sir John Clerk in 1747 that he regarded the Society as ‘annihilated’, apparently thinking that the death of Colin MacLaurin in 1746 and the temporary retirement to the countryside of its other Secretary, Andrew Plummer, had put an end to it. Sir John had (...)
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  8.  22
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh 1768–1783.Roger L. Emerson - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (3):255-303.
    The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh Throughout the years 1768–1783 looked to the outside world like a flourishing and important body. By 1771 it had sponsored the publication of five volumes of papers which had gone through several printings and translations. It had a distinguished foreign membership which assured its recognition abroad as one of the important academic bodies in the cosmopolitan Republic of Letters. From its foundation in 1737 until his death in 1768, its President had been the Earl of (...)
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  9. Judith N. Shklar, "Men and Citizens: A Study of Rousseau's Social Theory". [REVIEW]Roger L. Emerson - 1972 - Theory and Decision 3 (1):85.
     
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  10.  14
    Ian Simpson Ross, "Lord Kames and the Scotland of His Day". [REVIEW]Roger L. Emerson - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):111.
  11.  23
    Hume and the Bellman, Zerobabel MacGilchrist.Roger L. Emerson - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):9-28.
  12.  12
    A Bibliography for Hume’s History of England: A Preliminary View.Roger L. Emerson & Mark G. Spencer - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):53-71.
    Recent years have witnessed a renewed scholarly interest in David Hume’s History of England, and this essay adds to that interest by analyzing the sources that Hume used in the History. Unfortunately, Hume did not provide a bibliography or guide to those sources, and no scholar has produced one since. We have been preparing a bibliography for publication and the following essay is a preliminary view of some of what it will show. It demonstrates that Hume consulted and used more (...)
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  13.  9
    The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons, and Republicans. Margaret Jacob.Roger L. Emerson - 1984 - Isis 75 (1):230-231.
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  14.  4
    Guenter B. Risse. New Medical Challenges During the Scottish Enlightenment. 386 Pp., Bibl., Index. Amsterdam/New York: Editions Rodopi, 2005. $96. [REVIEW]Roger L. Emerson - 2006 - Isis 97 (4):753-754.
  15. Guy*. C? MICH.Roger L. Emerson & Nicholas J. Fox - forthcoming - History of Science.
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  16. Hume and Art: Reflections on a Man Who Could Not Hear, Sing or Look.Roger L. Emerson - 2007 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 62 (3):237-257.
     
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  17. The Organisation of Science and its Pursuit in Early Modern Europe.Roger L. Emerson - 1990 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 960--79.
     
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