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  1.  23
    “Underground Euthanasia” and the Harm Minimization Debate.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):486-495.
    I have a hairstylist whose lover was very sick. I’d been seeing this stylist for ten years and we’re good friends. [His lover was] becoming an invalid, not able to get out of bed. He said “I hate to ask you this but would you mind writing a prescription to help us out?” [So] I wrote a prescription to a patient who I had never seen, and I sent it to him in the mail and I heard the next time (...)
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  2.  25
    The Devil's Choice: Re-Thinking Law, Ethics, and Symptom Relief in Palliative Care.Roger S. Magnusson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):559-569.
    In 1982, cinemas around the world screened Sophie's Choice, a film starring Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline, adapted from the book by William Styron. The film opens with Stingo, a young journalist from the South, who arrives in New York in 1947 and rents a room in Brooklyn. Stingo is drawn into a relationship with Sophie and Nathan, the couple who live upstairs. Sophie is a Polish concentration camp survivor; Nathan is the man who saved her when she arrived in (...)
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  3.  42
    The Devil's Choice: Re-Thinking Law, Ethics, and Symptom Relief in Palliative Care.Roger S. Magnusson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):559-569.
    Health professionals do not always have the luxury of making “right” choices. This article introduces the “devil's choice” as a metaphor to describe medical choices that arise in circumstances where all the available options are both unwanted and perverse. Using the devil's choice, the paper criticizes the principle of double effect and provides a re-interpretation of the conventional legal and ethical account of symptom relief in palliative care.
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  4.  14
    “Underground Euthanasia” and the Harm Minimization Debate.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):486-495.
    I have a hairstylist whose lover was very sick. I’d been seeing this stylist for ten years and we’re good friends. [His lover was] becoming an invalid, not able to get out of bed. He said “I hate to ask you this but would you mind writing a prescription to help us out?” [So] I wrote a prescription to a patient who I had never seen, and I sent it to him in the mail and I heard the next time (...)
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  5.  22
    Mapping the Scope and Opportunities for Public Health Law in Liberal Democracies.Roger S. Magnusson - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):571-587.
    The two questions, “What is public health law?” and “How can law improve the public’s health?”, are perennial ones for public health law scholars. They are ideological questions because perceptions about the proper boundaries of law’s role will shape perceptions of what law can do, in an operational sense, to improve health outcomes. They are also theoretical questions, in the sense that, without closing down debate about the limits of public health law, these questions can be addressed by mapping the (...)
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  6.  9
    Who’s Afraid of the Nanny State? Introduction to a Symposium.Roger S. Magnusson & Paul E. Griffiths - 2015 - Public Health 129 (8):1017--1020.
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  7.  26
    Mapping the Scope and Opportunities for Public Health Law in Liberal Democracies.Roger S. Magnusson - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):571-587.
    The two questions, “What is public health law?” and “How can law improve the public's health?” are perennial ones for public health law scholars. This paper proposes a framework for conceptualizing discussion and debate about the scope and opportunities for public health law within liberal democracies. Part 2 of the paper draws selectively on this framework in order to highlight some areas where law's potential role deserves greater acknowledgment and exploration.
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  8.  62
    The Traditional Account of Ethics and Law at the End of Life—and its Discontents.Roger S. Magnusson - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):307-324.
    For the past 30 years, the Melbourne urologist Dr Rodney Syme has quietly—and more recently, not-so-quietly—assisted terminally and permanently ill people to die. This paper draws on Syme’s recent book, A Good Death: An Argument for Voluntary Euthanasia , to identify and to reflect on some important challenges to what I outline as the traditional account of law, ethics, and end of life decisions. Among the challenges Syme makes to the traditional view is his argument that physicians’ intentions are frail (...)
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  9.  14
    The Changing Legal and Conceptual Shape of Health Care Privacy.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):680-691.
    The contributions of Professor Bernard Dickens to health law and bioethics span the era in which these fields have emerged as distinct domains of teaching, scholarship and professional and public conversation. Neither field exists in a vacuum. The concerns of bioethics, like the content of health law, are a product of social forces. The bureaucratization of medical care, the possibilities and uncertainties created by developments in medical technology, not to mention glaring health inequalities, have been destabilizing forces in medicine. Writing (...)
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  10.  9
    The Changing Legal and Conceptual Shape of Health Care Privacy.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):680-691.
    The contributions of Professor Bernard Dickens to health law and bioethics span the era in which these fields have emerged as distinct domains of teaching, scholarship and professional and public conversation. Neither field exists in a vacuum. The concerns of bioethics, like the content of health law, are a product of social forces. The bureaucratization of medical care, the possibilities and uncertainties created by developments in medical technology, not to mention glaring health inequalities, have been destabilizing forces in medicine. Writing (...)
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  11.  33
    Global Health Governance and the Challenge of Chronic, Non-Communicable Disease.Roger S. Magnusson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):490-507.
    This paper considers how we can conceptualize a “global response” to chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) – including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and tobacco-related diseases. These diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries, and also in developing countries outside sub-Saharan Africa. The paper reviews emerging and proposed initiatives for global NCD governance, explains why NCDs merit a global response, and the ways in which global initiatives ultimately benefit national health outcomes. As the global response to NCDs (...)
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  12.  9
    Global Health Governance and the Challenge of Chronic, Non-Communicable Disease.Roger S. Magnusson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):490-507.
    Judging by their contribution to the global burden of death and disability, chronic, non-communicable diseases are the most serious health challenge facing the world today. The statistics tell a frightening story. Over 35 million people died from chronic diseases in 2005 — principally cardiovascular disease, cancer, and chronic respiratory disease. Driven by population growth and population ageing, deaths from non-communicable diseases are expected to increase by 17% over the period 2005-2015, accounting for 69% of global deaths by 2030.Cardiovascular disease, the (...)
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  13. The Researcher as Criminal: The Case of Russel Ogden.[This Commentary is Reproduced with Permission From Newsletter MBPSL (Medical Behaviour That Potentially Shortens Life) Research Program in the Dept. Of Legal Theory, Faculty of Law, Univeristy of Groningen.]. [REVIEW]Roger S. Magnusson - 2003 - Monash Bioethics Review 22 (2):27.