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Roger Sansom [11]Roger B. Sansom [1]
  1.  48
    Constraining the Adaptationism Debate.Roger Sansom - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (4):493-512.
    This contribution to the adaptationism debate elaborates the nature of constraints and their importance in evolutionary explanation and argues that the adaptationism debate should be limited to the issue of how to privilege causes in evolutionary explanation. I argue that adaptationist explanations are deeply conceptually dependent on developmental constraints, and explanations that appeal to constraints are dependant on the results of natural selection. I suggest these explanations should be integrated into the framework of historical causal explanation. Each strategy explicitly appeals (...)
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  2.  99
    The Nature of Developmental Constraints and the Difference-Maker Argument for Externalism.Roger Sansom - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):441-459.
    One current version of the internalism/externalism debate in evolutionary theory focuses on the relative importance of developmental constraints in evolutionary explanation. The received view of developmental constraints sees them as an internalist concept that tend to be shared across related species as opposed to selective pressures that are not. Thus, to the extent that constraints can explain anything, they can better explain similarity across species, while natural selection is better able to explain their differences. I challenge both of these aspects (...)
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  3.  38
    The Connectionist Framework for Gene Regulation.Roger Sansom - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (4):475-491.
    I show that gene regulation networks are qualitatively consistent and therefore sufficiently similar to linearly seperable connectionist networks to warrant that the connectionist framework be applied to gene regulation. On this view, natural selection designs gene regulation networks to overcome the difficulty of development. I offer some general lessons about their evolvability that can be learned by examining the generic features of connectionist networks.
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  4.  37
    Countering Kauffman with Connectionism: Two Views of Gene Regulation and the Fundamental Nature of Ontogeny: Articles.Roger Sansom - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (2):169-200.
    Understanding the operation and evolution of gene regulation networks is critical to understanding ontogeny and evolution. According to Stuart Kauffman's view, each cell type cycles through its own repeated pattern of gene expression, the order of ontogeny is dependent on these cycles being short, and evolution is possible because these cycles mutate gradually. This view of gene regulation reflects Kauffman's view that ontogeny is fundamentally the process of cells repeating cycles of activity. I criticize Kauffman's view of gene regulation networks (...)
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  5.  4
    Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice.Roger Sansom & Robert Brandon (eds.) - 2007 - MIT Press.
    Embryos, cells, genes, and organisms : reflections on the history of evolutionary developmental biology / Manfred D. Laubichler and Jane Maienschein The organismic systems approach : streamlining the naturalistic agenda / Werner Callebaut, Gerd B. Müller, and Stuart A. Newman Complex traits : genetics, development, and evolution / H. Frederik Nijhout Functional and developmental constraints on life-cycle evolution : an attempt on the architecture of constraints / Gerhard Schlosser Legacies of adaptive development / Roger Sansom Evo-devo meets the mind : (...)
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  6.  34
    Auxiliary Hypotheses in Evidence and Evolution. [REVIEW]Roger Sansom - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (3):673-682.
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  7.  2
    Books and Software Reviews-Unto Others the Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior. [REVIEW]Roger Sansom - 1999 - Complexity 5 (2):33-34.
  8. Development as an Adaptation: A Philosophical Contribution to the Developmental Synthesis.Roger B. Sansom - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Empirical advances in biology led to the popularity of a view known as gene selectionism, most recently championed by Richard Dawkins' "The Selfish Gene" . On this view, natural selection "looked through" the organism right to the genome; evolution was a change in the genomes of a species over time and the process of development is rendered epiphenominal to that process. Recently, support for gene selectionism has waned in favor of a pluralistic view. On this view, natural selection operates at (...)
     
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  9.  25
    Now, Would Each Group Please Select a Religion.Roger Sansom - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):743-750.
  10.  4
    The Nature of Constraints.Roger Sansom - 2009 - In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 201.
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  11.  8
    Unto Others The Evolution And Psychology of Unselfish Behavior by Elliot Sober and David Sloan Wilson.Roger Sansom - 1999 - Complexity 5 (2):33-35.
  12.  16
    What Are the Implications of Evolvable Molecules?: James A. Shapiro: Evolution: A View From the 21st Century. Upper Saddle River, NJ: FT Science Press, 2011. Xviii+253 Pp. ISBN: 978-0-13-278093-3, $34.99 PB.Roger Sansom - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):425-432.
    James Shapiro’s view of evolution is inspired by looking at the molecular mechanisms of mutation. Finding these systems to be intelligent and the mutations non-gradual, Shapiro concludes that neither the role of DNA in development, nor and the role of natural selection in evolution are what we thought them to be. The cases discussed are interesting and may require some modification of theory in biology, but this reviewer finds many of Shapiro’s conclusions unwarranted.
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