Search results for 'Roman Republic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  18
    S. P. Oakley (1985). Single Combat in the Roman Republic. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):392-.
    In his discussion of Roman military institutions Polybius described how the desire for fame might inspire Roman soldiers to heroic feats of bravery, including single combat: τ δ μέγιστον, ο νέοι παρορμνται πρς τ πν πομένειν πρ τν κοινν πραγμάτων χάριν το τυχεν τς συνακολουθούσης τος γαθος τν νδρν εκλείας. πίστιν δ' χει τ λεγόμενον κ τούτων. πολλο μν γρ μονο-μάχησαν κουσίως ωμαίων πρ τς τν λων κρίσεως κτλ. Modern scholars, however, have taken little notice of this remark (...)
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  2.  3
    Benjamin Straumann (2011). Constitutional Thought in the Late Roman Republic. History of Political Thought 32 (2):280-292.
    Emergency powers are widely held to have contributed in important ways to the Roman Republic's demise and to the erection of the Principate. The debate waged during the late Republic over such powers is certainly one of the most prominent features in late Republican political thought and controversy, and it would be hard to overlook the fact that it was a debate over constitutional principle. Taking seriously the constitutional character of that debate, this article seeks to answer (...)
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  3.  4
    A. W. Lintott (1968). Nundinae and The Chronology of the Late Roman Republic. Classical Quarterly 18 (01):189-.
    In a previous article I argued that the promulgatio trinundinum, regularly necessary before a vote in a legislative assembly, an election, or a iudicium populi during the late Roman Republic, was not the declaration of an interval of time but a publication of the proposed business which had to be made over three market-days or nundinae. These market-days occurred continuously at eight-day intervals, and no fresh start was made at the beginning of a year or other period. So (...)
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  4. Valentina Arena (2013). Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive analysis of the idea of libertas and its conflicting uses in the political struggles of the late Roman Republic. By reconstructing Roman political thinking about liberty against the background of Classical and Hellenistic thought, it excavates two distinct intellectual traditions on the means allowing for the preservation and the loss of libertas. Considering the interplay of these traditions in the political debates of the first century BC, Dr Arena offers a significant reinterpretation of (...)
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  5. Federico Santangelo (2013). Priestly Auctoritas in the Roman Republic. Classical Quarterly 63 (2):743-763.
    Some of the best recent work on Roman priesthoods under the Republic has engaged with the issue of priestly authority and its role in defining the place of priesthoods vis-à-vis other centres of power, influence and knowledge. The aim of this paper is to make a contribution to this line of enquiry by focussing on the concept of priestly auctoritas, which has seldom received close attention. The working hypothesis is that the study of priestly auctoritas may contribute to (...)
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  6. Marc Wilde (2012). The Dictator's Trust: Regulating and Constraining Emergency Powers in the Roman Republic. History of Political Thought 33 (4):555-557.
    This article seeks to explain how it was possible that, until the first century BC, the Roman dictatorship was never abused and turned against the constitution itself. The traditional explanation is that, contrary to its first century imitations, the dictatorship was subject to formal restrictions, such as the six months' tenure, which were strictly applied. By contrast, this article suggests that informal constraints on the dictator's powers, such as moral and religious norms, were as important as formal constraints. It (...)
     
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  7.  3
    Marc de Wilde (2012). The Dictators Trust: Regulating and Constraining Emergency Powers in the Roman Republic. History of Political Thought 33 (4):555-577.
    This article seeks to explain how it was possible that, until the first century BC, the Roman dictatorship was never abused and turned against the constitution itself. The traditional explanation is that, contrary to its first century imitations, the dictatorship was subject to formal restrictions, such as the six months' tenure, which were strictly applied. By contrast, this article suggests that informal constraints on the dictator's powers, such as moral and religious norms, were as important as formal constraints. It (...)
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  8. Sander M. Goldberg (2005). Constructing Literature in the Roman Republic. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines how the Romans came to have a literature, how that literature reflected native and foreign impulses, and how it formed a legacy for subsequent generations have become central questions in the cultural history of the Republic. It examines the problem of Rome's literary development by shifting attention from Rome's writers to its readers. The literature we traditionally call 'early' is seen to be a product less of the mid-Republic, when poetic texts began to circulate, than (...)
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  9. Sander M. Goldberg (2005). Constructing Literature in the Roman Republic. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines how the Romans came to have a literature, how that literature reflected native and foreign impulses, and how it formed a legacy for subsequent generations have become central questions in the cultural history of the Republic. It examines the problem of Rome's literary development by shifting attention from Rome's writers to its readers. The literature we traditionally call 'early' is seen to be a product less of the mid-Republic, when poetic texts began to circulate, than (...)
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  10.  45
    Jerzy Linderski (2001). The Constitution of the Roman Republic (Review). American Journal of Philology 122 (4):589-592.
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  11.  14
    Eleonora Zampieri (forthcoming). New Perspectives on Caesar's Life. T. Stevenson Julius Caesar and the Transformation of the Roman Republic. Pp. XII + 212, Ills, Maps. London and New York: Routledge, 2015. Paper, £25.99, Us$44.95 . Isbn: 978-1-138-80821-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-2.
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  12.  11
    Paul Burton (forthcoming). A History of the Social War. C.J. Dart the Social War, 91 to 88bce. A History of the Italian Insurgency Against the Roman Republic. Pp. XII + 252, Ills, Maps. Farnham, Surrey and Burlington, Vt: Ashgate, 2014. Cased, £70. Isbn: 978-1-4724-1676-6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-2.
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  13.  29
    G. H. Stevenson (1924). The Roman Republic and the Founder of the Empire The Roman Republic and the Founder of the Empire. By T. Rice Holmes. Three Vols. Pp. Xvi + 486; Xvi + 337; Xix + 620. Oxford: University Press, 1923. £3 3s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (3-4):78-79.
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  14.  23
    Thomas Fischer (1991). The Coins of the Roman Republic in the Kestner Museum, Hanover. Philosophy and History 24 (1/2):71-72.
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  15.  11
    W. H. W. (1921). Phases of Corruption in Roman Administration in the Last Half-Century of Roman Republic. By R. O. Jolliffe. One Volume. 8vo. Pp. 109. Menasha, Wisconsin: George Banta Publishing Company, 1919. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (3-4):80-81.
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  16.  8
    Michael J. Taylor (2015). Winning While Losing in the Roman Republic. J.H. Clark Triumph in Defeat. Military Loss and the Roman Republic. Pp. XVIII + 240, Maps. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Cased, £48, Us$74. Isbn: 978-0-19-933654-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):523-524.
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  17.  8
    Jane Hjarl Petersen (2015). A Republican Archaeology Companion. J.D. Evans a Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republic. Pp. XXIV + 722, Figs, Ills, Maps. Malden, Ma and Oxford: Wiley–Blackwell, 2013. Cased, £120, €144. Isbn: 978-1-4051-9966-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):576-578.
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  18.  14
    Richard Saller (1987). Lntellectual Life in the Late Roman Republic. Ancient Philosophy 7:251-253.
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  19.  10
    M. Cary (1936). The End of the Roman Republic G. Bloch and J. Carcopino: La République Romaine de 133 À 44 Avant J.-C. 2 Vols. Pp. 1059; 10 Maps and Plans. Paris: Les Presses Universitaires de France, 1935–1936. Paper, 45 and 60 Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (04):135-137.
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  20.  10
    Ohn Crook (1969). The Law of Persons in the Late Republic Alan Watson: The Law of Persons in the Later Roman Republic. Pp. Xii+269. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967. Cloth, £3. 15s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (01):88-90.
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  21.  10
    J. L. Strachan Davidson (1910). II. Roman Republic. The Classical Review 24 (04):107-109.
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  22.  10
    Malcolm R. Green (1972). Stewart Perowne: Death of the Roman Republic. Pp. Xvii + 289. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1969. Cloth, £2·25. The Classical Review 22 (01):131-132.
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  23.  10
    Thomas Habinek (2013). Reconstructing the Roman Republic: An Ancient Political Culture and Modern Research. The European Legacy 18 (6):768-770.
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  24.  10
    R. M. Ogilvie (1969). The Origins of the Roman Republic. The Classical Review 19 (03):323-.
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  25.  10
    Mary Siani-Davies (1993). Manfred Fuhrmann: Cicero and the Roman Republic. Translated by W. E. Yuill. Pp. Viii + 249; 2 Maps. Oxford and Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1992. £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (02):452-.
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  26.  10
    T. P. Wiseman (1990). The Fall of the Roman Republic. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (1):106-107.
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  27.  9
    Saskia T. Roselaar (2011). Kelly A History of Exile in the Roman Republic. Pp. X + 260. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Cased, £47, US$88.99. ISBN: 978-0-521-84860-2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (1):312-313.
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  28.  16
    A. F. Giles (1937). The Roman Republic H. W. Household: Rome, Republic and Empire. Vol. I: The Republic. Pp. Xii + 308; 3 Maps. London: Dent, 1936. Cloth, 3s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (01):28-29.
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  29.  8
    Bryan Brinkman (2013). A.B. Gallia Remembering the Roman Republic. Culture, Politics and History Under the Principate. Pp. Xiv + 319, Ills, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £60, US$95. ISBN: 978-1-107-01260-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):531-533.
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  30.  8
    A. T. Fear (2011). The Roman Army Dobson The Army of the Roman Republic. The Second Century BC, Polybius and the Camps at Numantia, Spain. Pp. Xii + 436, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2008. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-1-84217-241-4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (1):218-220.
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  31.  8
    Steven J. Green (2014). The Republic in Augustan Poetry. Farrell, Nelis Augustan Poetry and the Roman Republic. Pp. XII + 393.Oxford:Oxford University Press,2013. Cased, £80, Us$150. Isbn:978-0-19-958722-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (2):461-463.
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  32.  8
    John C. Johnson (2013). S.T. Roselaar Public Land in the Roman Republic. A Social and Economic History of Ager Publicus in Italy, 396–89 Bc. Pp. X + 360, Figs, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Cased, £83, US$150. ISBN: 978-0-19-957723-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):178-180.
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  33.  15
    Andrew Drummond (2003). The Annals Of The Roman Republic. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (1):154-156.
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  34.  15
    Peter Birks (1978). Republican Judicature J. M. Kelly: Studies in the Civil Judicature of the Roman Republic. Pp. Vii + 136. Oxford: University Press, 1976. Cloth, £5·75. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):97-98.
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  35.  15
    A. F. Giles (1933). A History of the Roman Republic. By Cyril E. Robinson. Pp. Xi + 471; 14 Maps. London: Methuen, 1932. Cloth, 6s. The Classical Review 47 (02):86-87.
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  36.  17
    Celeste-Marie Bernier, Radu J. Bogdan, James T. Boulton, T. O. McLoughlin, James Boswell, James Berry, Caroline Lennox, Timothy M. Costelloe & Marica Costigliolo (forthcoming). Arena, Valentina. Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic. New York: Cambridge UP, 2013. Ix, 324p., Bibl., Ill., Index, $99. Competing Languages of ''Liberty''and Political Legitimacy in the First Century BC Ball, Philip. Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything. Chicago. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  37.  13
    Malcolm Schofield (2004). Perceptions Of The Roman Republic. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (1):169-171.
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  38.  13
    W. E. Heitland (1933). The Last Century of the Roman Republic The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume IX. The Roman Republic 133–44 B.C. Pp. Xxxi+1023; Maps, Tables, Plans, Etc. Cambridge: University Press, 1932. Cloth, 37s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (05):188-191.
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  39.  8
    Daniel J. Gargola (2006). The Laws of the Roman People: Public Law in the Expansion and Decline of the Roman Republic. American Journal of Philology 127 (3):469-473.
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  40.  1
    Alexander Yakobson (1995). Secret Ballot and Its Effects in the Late Roman Republic. Hermes 123 (4):426-442.
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  41.  8
    Helga Botermann (1980). Force and Rule. The Provincial System of Rule in the Roman Republic. Philosophy and History 13 (2):200-202.
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  42.  26
    T. J. Cadoux (1988). Mrr III T. R. S. Broughton: The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, Vol. 3: Supplement. (American Philological Association, Philological Monographs, 15, Ed. S. Treggiari.) Pp. Ix + 294. Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.: Scholars Press, 1986. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):314-315.
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  43.  12
    D. H. Berry (1992). Tlrr Michael C. Alexander: Trials in the Late Roman Republic, 149 BC to 50 BC. (Phoenix Suppl., 26.) Pp. Xviii + 233. Toronto, Buffalo and London: University of Toronto Press, 1990. £31. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):109-110.
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  44.  12
    H. H. Scullard (1957). F. R. Cowell: Cicero and the Roman Republic. Pp. Xviii + 398; 32 Plates, 3 Maps. West Drayton: Penguin Books, 1956. Paper, 5s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (3-4):268-.
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  45.  12
    Benjamin Straumann (2013). H. Beck, A. Duplá, M. Jehne, F. Pina Polo Consuls and Res Publica. Holding High Office in the Roman Republic. Pp. X + 376. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Cased, £65, US$110. ISBN: 978-1-107-00154-1.F. Pina Polo The Consul at Rome. The Civil Functions of the Consuls in the Roman Republic. Pp. X + 379, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Cased, £65, US$110. ISBN: 978-0-521-19083-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):174-178.
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  46.  6
    C. E. W. Steel (2005). Popular Decision-Making R. Morstein-Marx: Mass Oratory and Political Power in the Late Roman Republic . Pp. Xiv + 313, Maps, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Cased, £50, US$75. ISBN: 0-521-82327-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):617-.
  47.  4
    H. K. Hunt (1967). The Importance of Zeno's Physics for an Understanding of Stoicism During the Late Roman Republic. Apeiron 1 (2):5 - 14.
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  48.  11
    J. H. Vince (1902). Davis' a Friend of Caesar A Friend of Caesar: A Tale of the Fall of the Roman Republic. By William Stearns Davis. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1900. The Classical Review 16 (02):135-.
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  49.  11
    J. Wight Duff (1931). Roman Life and Literature Life and Literature in the Roman Republic. By Tenney Frank, Professor of Latin in the Johns Hopkins University, Sather Professor of Classical Literature in the University of California, 1929–30. Pp. Viii + 256. Cambridge: University Press, 1930. Cloth, 15s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (04):139-140.
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  50.  12
    Mary Siani-Davies (1995). T. Wiedemann: Cicero and the End of the Roman Republic. (Classical World Series.) Pp. X+92; 21 Figs. London: Bristol Classical Press, 1994. Paper £6.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 45 (01):190-191.
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