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  1.  72
    Women on Corporate Boards of Directors: A Needed Resource. [REVIEW]Ronald J. Burke - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):909-915.
    This research reports the results of a study of women serving on boards of directors of Canadian private and public sector organizations. These women (N = 278) were an impressive and talented group (eduction, professional designations). In addition, they brought a variety of backgrounds and expertise to their director responsibilities. Most were nominated as a result of recommendations from current board members, CEOs, or someone who knew board members or CEOs. Thus personal relationships (the old boy's network) as well as (...)
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  2.  35
    Predictor of Business Students' Attitudes Toward Sustainable Business Practices.Eddy S. Ng & Ronald J. Burke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):603 - 615.
    This study examined individual difference characteristics as predictors of business students' attitudes toward sustainable business practices. Three types of predictors were considered: personal values, individualism—collectivism, and leadership styles. Data were collected from 248 business students attending a mid-sized university in western United States using self-reported questionnaires. Few gender differences were present.Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for personal demographic characteristics, indicated that business students scoring higher on Rokeach's social value scale, collectivism, and transformational leadership also reported more positive attitudes toward sustainable business (...)
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  3.  8
    Predictor of Business Students’ Attitudes Toward Sustainable Business Practices.Eddy S. Ng & Ronald J. Burke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):603-615.
    This study examined individual difference characteristics as predictors of business students’ attitudes toward sustainable business practices. Three types of predictors were considered: personal values, individualism–collectivism, and leadership styles. Data were collected from 248 business students attending a mid-sized university in western United States using self-reported questionnaires. Few gender differences were present. Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for personal demographic characteristics, indicated that business students scoring higher on Rokeach’s social value scale, collectivism, and transformational leadership also reported more positive attitudes toward sustainable (...)
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  4.  47
    Work Motivations, Work Outcomes, and Health: Passion Versus Addiction.Ronald J. Burke & Lisa Fiksenbaum - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S2):257-263.
    Individuals in managerial and professional jobs now work long hours for a variety of reasons. Building on previous research on workaholism and on types of passion, the results of three exploratory studies of correlates of work-based Passion and Addiction are presented. Data were collected in three samples using anonymously completed questionnaires: Canadian managers and professionals, Australian psychologists, and Norwegian journalists. A common pattern of findings was observed in the three samples. First, respondents scoring higher on Passion and on Addiction were (...)
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  5.  47
    Working to Live or Living to Work: Should Individuals and Organizations Care?Ronald J. Burke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S2):167 - 172.
    This introduction sets the stage for the Special Issue and the manuscripts that follow. Interest in work hours, work intensification and work addiction has grown over the past decade. Several factors have come together to increase hours spent at work, the nature of work itself, and motivations for working hard, particularly among managers and professionals. The introduction first reviews some of the known causes and consequences of long work hours and the intensification of work. A case is then made as (...)
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  6.  39
    Save the Males: Backlash in Organizations.Ronald J. Burke & Susan Black - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):933-942.
    This paper reviews the literature on male backlash in organizations, proposing a research agenda. It defines backlash, examines its causes and manifestations, who is likely to exhibit it, and offers suggestions for addressing backlash. Backlash may be on the increase in organizations and society at large. Current efforts to weaken or remove the legislative support for employment equity initiatives are one sign of this.
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  7.  43
    Women in Corporate Management.Ronald J. Burke - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):873-875.
    This introductory article positions the Special Issue devoted to women in corporate management. Women in all developing countries face a glass ceiling to advancement to senior management in medium and large organizations. It then reviews the eight manuscripts in the collection, integrating women in management themes into the mainstream of business ethics.
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  8.  21
    Work Stress and Women's Health: Occupational Status Effects. [REVIEW]Ronald J. Burke - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):91 - 102.
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  9.  3
    Introduction.Ronald J. Burke - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):1 - 3.
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