101 found
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  1.  10
    Why Not Common Morality?Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):770-777.
    This paper challenges the leading common morality accounts of medical ethics which hold that medical ethics is nothing but the ethics of everyday life applied to today’s high-tech medicine. Using illustrative examples, the paper shows that neither the Beauchamp and Childress four-principle account of medical ethics nor the Gert et al 10-rule version is an adequate and appropriate guide for physicians’ actions. By demonstrating that medical ethics is distinctly different from the ethics of everyday life and cannot be derived from (...)
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  2.  1
    Medical Ethics: Common or Uncommon Morality?Rosamond Rhodes - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):404-420.
    This paper challenges the long-standing and widely accepted view that medical ethics is nothing more than common morality applied to clinical matters. It argues against Tom Beauchamp and James Childress’s four principles; Bernard Gert, K. Danner Clouser and Charles Culver’s ten rules; and Albert Jonsen, Mark Siegler, and William Winslade’s four topics approaches to medical ethics. First, a negative argument shows that common morality does not provide an account of medical ethics and then a positive argument demonstrates why the medical (...)
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  3.  93
    Rethinking Research Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):7 – 28.
    Contemporary research ethics policies started with reflection on the atrocities perpetrated upoconcentration camp inmates by Nazi doctors. Apparently, as a consequence of that experience, the policies that now guide human subject research focus on the protection of human subjects by making informed consent the centerpiece of regulatory attention. I take the choice of context for policy design, the initial prioritization of informed consent, and several associated conceptual missteps, to have set research ethics off in the wrong direction. The aim of (...)
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  4.  14
    Rethinking Research Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):19-36.
    Contemporary research ethics policies started with reflection on the atrocities perpetrated upon concentration camp inmates by Nazi doctors. Apparently, as a consequence of that experience, the policies that now guide human subject research focus on the protection of human subjects by making informed consent the centerpiece of regulatory attention. I take the choice of context for policy design, the initial prioritization of informed consent, and several associated conceptual missteps, to have set research ethics off in the wrong direction. The aim (...)
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  5.  95
    Genetic Links, Family Ties, and Social Bonds: Rights and Responsibilities in the Face of Genetic Knowledge.Rosamond Rhodes - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):10 – 30.
    Currently, some of the most significant moral issues involving genetic links relate to genetic knowledge. In this paper, instead of looking at the frequently addressed issues of responsibilities professionals or institutions have to individuals, I take up the question of what responsibilities individuals have to one another with respect to genetic knowledge. I address the questions of whether individuals have a moral right to pursue their own goals without contributing to society's knowledge of population genetics, without adding to their family's (...)
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  6.  6
    Conscience, Conscientious Objections, and Medicine.Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):487-506.
    To inform the ongoing discussion of whether claims of conscientious objection allow medical professionals to refuse to perform tasks that would otherwise be their duty, this paper begins with a review of the philosophical literature that describes conscience as either a moral sense or the dictate of reason. Even though authors have starkly different views on what conscience is, advocates of both approaches agree that conscience should be obeyed and that keeping promises is a conscience-given moral imperative. The paper then (...)
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  7.  36
    Transplant Tourism in China: A Tale of Two Transplants.Rosamond Rhodes & Thomas Schiano - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):3-11.
    The use of organs obtained from executed prisoners in China has recently been condemned by every major transplant organization. The government of the People's Republic of China has also recently made it illegal to provide transplant organs from executed prisoners to foreigners transplant tourists. Nevertheless, the extreme shortage of transplant organs in the U.S. continues to make organ transplantation in China an appealing option for some patients with end-stage disease. Their choice of traveling to China for an organ leaves U.S. (...)
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  8.  46
    The Ethical Standard of Care.Rosamond Rhodes - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):76-78.
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  9. The Human Microbiome: Ethical, Legal, and Social Concerns.Abraham Schwab, Rosamond Rhodes & Nada Nada - unknown
    The human microbiome is the bacteria, viruses, and fungi that cover our skin, line our intestines, and flourish in our body cavities. Work on the human microbiome is new, but it is quickly becoming a leading area of biomedical research. What scientists are learning about humans and our microbiomes could change medical practice by introducing new treatment modalities. This new knowledge redefines us as superorganisms comprised of the human body and the collection of microbes that inhabit it and reveals how (...)
     
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  10.  43
    In Defense of the Duty to Participate in Biomedical Research.Rosamond Rhodes - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):37 – 38.
  11.  86
    The Not Unreasonable Standard for Assessment of Surrogates and Surrogate Decisions.Rosamond Rhodes & Ian Holzman - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):367-386.
    Standard views on surrogate decision making present alternative ideal models of what ideal surrogates should consider in rendering a decision. They do not, however, explain the physician''s responsibility to a patient who lacks decisional capacity or how a physician should regard surrogates and surrogate decisions. The authors argue that it is critical to recognize the moral difference between a patient''s decisions and a surrogate''s and the professional responsibilities implied by that distinction. In every case involving a patient who lacks decisional (...)
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  12. The Human Microbiome: Ethical, Legal and Social Concerns.Rosamond Rhodes, Nada Gligorov & Abraham Schwab (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford university press.
     
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  13.  14
    Innovation in a Learning Healthcare System.Henry S. Sacks & Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):19-21.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 19-21.
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  14.  37
    De Minimis Risk: A Proposal for a New Category of Research Risk.Rosamond Rhodes - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (11):1-7.
    In this article the authors reflect on regulations which have been developed to protect research subjects and data in research which uses human subjects. They suggest that regulations related to informed consent and privacy protection are burdensome in research which uses human subjects. They argue that a new category of research risk must be established which informs research subjects of the level of risk that they will be exposed to by participating in the research.
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  15.  15
    To Act or Not to Act, That Is the Question.Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):39-41.
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  16.  15
    When Is Participation in Research a Moral Duty?Rosamond Rhodes - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):318-326.
    No categories
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  17.  13
    Access for the Terminally Ill to Experimental Medical Innovations: A Three-Pronged Threat.Shira Bender, Lauren Flicker & Rosamond Rhodes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):3 – 6.
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  18.  88
    Autonomy, Respect, and Genetic Information Policy: A Reply to Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry.Rosamond Rhodes - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):114 – 120.
  19.  9
    Resisting Paternalism in Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing.Rosamond Rhodes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):35-37.
  20.  33
    Understanding, Being, and Doing: Medical Ethics in Medical Education.Rosamond Rhodes & Devra S. Cohen - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):39-53.
    Over the past 15 years, medical schools have paid some attention to the importance of developing students' communication skills as part of their medical education. Over the past decade, medical ethics has been added to the curriculum of most U.S. medical schools, at least on paper. More recently, there has been growing discussion of the importance of professionalism in medical education. Yet, the nature and content of these fields and their relationship to one another remains confused and vague, and that (...)
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  21. The Professional Responsibilities of Medicine.Rosamond Rhodes - 2007 - In Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell.
     
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  22. A Systematic Approach to Clinical Moral Reasoning.Rosamond Rhodes & David Alfandre - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (2):66-70.
    Because the process of moving from moral principles and facts to action-guiding moral conclusions has not been articulated clearly enough to be useful in a practical way, we designed a systematic approach to aid learners and clinicians in their application of ethical principles to the resolution of clinical dilemmas. Our model for clinical moral reasoning is intended to provide a clear and replicable structure that makes the thought process involved in reasoning about clinical cases explicit. In this paper we present (...)
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  23.  14
    Being a Doctor and Being a Hospital.Rosamond Rhodes & Michael Danziger - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):51-53.
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  24.  14
    The Goodness of Ethics in Research Ethics Review.Rosamond Rhodes - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):489-490.
    In their article, “The job of ‘ethics committees’”, Andrew Moore and Andrew Donnelly argue that current guidance documents provide that institutional research review committees ) perform two different and distinct functions, namely, a regulative review and an ethical review. They argue for separating those functions and for eliminating the ethics review role from IRBs. Instead, they want IRBs to focus exclusively on determining whether research proposals conform to governing regulations. In their argument, Moore and Donnelly correctly note that regulatory requirements (...)
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  25.  32
    Improving Third-Year Medical Students' Competency in Clinical Moral Reasoning: Two Interventions.Paul J. Cummins, Katherine J. Mendis, Robert Fallar, Amanda Favia, Lily Frank, Carolyn Plunkett, Nada Gligorov & Rosamond Rhodes - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):140-148.
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  26.  62
    Understanding the Trusted Doctor and Constructing a Theory of Bioethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (6):493-504.
    This paper offers a constructivist account of bioethics as an alternative to previous discussions that explained the ethics of medicine by an extrapolation of principles or virtues from ordinary morality. Taking medicine as a higher and special calling, I argue that the practice of medicine would be impossible without the trust of patients. Because trust is a necessary condition for medical practice, the ethics of the profession must provide the principles for guiding physician behavior and the profession toward promoting trust (...)
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  27.  46
    Affective Forecasting and Its Implications for Medical Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes & James Strain - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):54-65.
    Through a number of studies recently published in the psychology literature, T.D. Wilson, D.T. Gilbert, and others have demonstrated that our judgments about what our future mental states will be are contaminated by various distortions. Their studies distinguish a variety of different distortions, but they refer to them all with the generic term “affective forecasting.” The findings of their studies on normal volunteers are remarkably robust and, therefore, demonstrate that we are all vulnerable to the distortions of affective forecasting. a.
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  28.  19
    Associative Duties and Professional Obligations.Rosamond Rhodes & Michael Danziger - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):57-59.
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  29.  43
    Trust and Transforming Medical Institutions.Rosamond Rhodes & James J. Strain - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (2):205-217.
    Medicine needs our trust. We need to be able to rely on individual clinicians and researchers, and we need to be able to have confidence in hospitals and clinics. Yet the organization of our healthcare institutions is not designed to promote that trust. In fact, the structure of our medical institutions seems to undermine our faith.
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  30.  7
    Love Thy Neighbor: Replacing Paternalistic Protection as the Grounds for Research Ethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):49-51.
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  31.  18
    The Role of Community Consultation in the Ethical Conduct of Research Without Consent.Lynne D. Richardson, Rosamond Rhodes, Deborah Fish Ragin & Ilene Wilets - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):33 – 35.
  32.  33
    Pedagogical Goals for Academic Bioethics Programs.Denise M. Dudzinski, Rosamond Rhodes & Autumn Fiester - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (3):284-296.
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  33.  28
    Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care.Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.) - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    Because medicine can preserve and restore health and function, it is widely acknowledged as a basic good that a just society owes its members. Yet there is controversy over the scope of what should be provided, to whom, how, when and why. This comprehensive and authoritative book - by well-known philosophers, doctors, lawyers, political scientists, and economists - lays a theoretical foundation for understanding the debate, assesses how health care is distributed in different countries and to various social groups, and (...)
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  34.  30
    Privacy Overkill.Rosamond Rhodes & Daniel A. Moros - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):12-15.
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  35.  19
    Commentary: The Professional Obligation of Physicians in Times of Hazard and Need.Rosamond Rhodes - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (4):424-428.
    Those who read only the introductory section of “Physician Obligation in Disaster Preparedness and Response,” the statement from the AMA's Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, apparently an elaboration on CEJA Opinion 3-I-04, E-9.067, will find an expression of laudable professional responsibility in the face of a disaster. There the AMA authors explicitly acknowledge “that unique responsibilities beyond planning rest on the shoulders of the medical profession”. They also declare that, “physicians are needed to care for victims. In some instances, (...)
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  36.  46
    Hobbes’s unReasonable Fool.Rosamond Rhodes - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):93-102.
  37.  61
    Reading Rawls and Hearing Hobbes.Rosamond Rhodes - 2002 - Philosophical Forum 33 (4):393–412.
  38.  61
    Justice in Medicine and Public Health.Rosamond Rhodes - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):13-26.
    a This paper is a revised and shortened version of my chapter, “Justice in Allocations for Terrorism, Biological Warfare, and Public Health” in Public Health Ethics, edited by Michael Boylan, Kluwer; 2004. Portions of this material were presented at the International Bioethics Retreat, Pavia, Italy, June 2003, and at the meetings of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences, Philadelphia, September 2003.
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  39.  13
    Research With Controlled Drugs: Why and Why Not? Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “An Ethical Exploration of Barriers to Research on Controlled Drugs”.Michael H. Andreae, Evelyn Rhodes, Tyler Bourgoise, George M. Carter, Robert S. White, Debbie Indyk, Henry Sacks & Rosamond Rhodes - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):1-3.
    We examine the ethical, social, and regulatory barriers that may hinder research on therapeutic potential of certain controversial controlled substances like marijuana, heroin, or ketamine. Hazards for individuals and society and potential adverse effects on communities may be good reasons for limiting access and justify careful monitoring of these substances. Overly strict regulations, fear of legal consequences, stigma associated with abuse and populations using illicit drugs, and lack of funding may, however, limit research on their considerable therapeutic potential. We review (...)
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  40.  29
    Molding Professional Character.Rosamond Rhodes & Lawrence G. Smith - 2006 - Advances in Bioethics 10:99-114.
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  41.  7
    A Defence of Medical Ethics as Uncommon Morality.Rosamond Rhodes - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):792-793.
    I am grateful to the esteemed commentators for their critiques of my paper, ‘Why Not Common Morality’.1 As I read through their remarks, however, they seemed to be talking past my arguments. Their criticisms nevertheless make it clear that I need to explain myself better. I am therefore grateful to the editor for allowing me this opportunity to clarify my position. My paper presented two arguments for concluding that common morality is untenable as an account of medical ethics. First, I (...)
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  42.  15
    The Pressing Need for Postdoctoral Research Ethics Education.Rosamond Rhodes - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):1-3.
  43.  35
    Love Thy Patient: Justice, Caring, and the Doctor–Patient Relationship.Rosamond Rhodes - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):434.
    Traditional moral theories of rights and principles have dominated medical ethics discussions for decades. Appeals to utilitarian consequences, as well as the principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, and justice, have provided the standard vocabulary and filled the literature of the field.Recently on the bioethics scene, however, there has been some discussion of virtue, and, particularly within the nursing ethics literature, appeals are being made to the feminist ethics of care. This intimation of a shift in the wind may have (...)
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  44.  67
    Abortion and Assent.Rosamond Rhodes - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):416-427.
    Volumes have been written arguing the morality of abortion. A crucial premise in many of these arguments concerns the status of the fetus; specifically, that the fetus has or does not have a right to life. Opponents of abortion typically argue that fetuses are persons and hence have an inviolable right to life. Advocates of the right to abortion typically maintain that fetuses are not persons and hence have no right to life.
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  45.  22
    Faces Matter.Zil Goldstein, Jess Ting & Rosamond Rhodes - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (12):10-12.
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  46. Incentives for Healthy Behavior.Rosamond Rhodes - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (3):inside back cover-inside back co.
  47.  72
    Two Concepts of Medical Ethics and Their Implications for Medical Ethics Education.Rosamond Rhodes - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (4):493 – 508.
    People who discuss medical ethics or bioethics come to very different conclusions about the levels of agreement in the field and the implications of consensus among health care professionals. In this paper I argue that these disagreements turn on a confusion of two distinct senses of medical ethics. I differentiate (1) medical ethics as a subject in applied ethics from (2) medical ethics as the professional moral commitments of health care professions. I then use the distinction to explain its significant (...)
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  48.  35
    A Kantian Duty to Commit Suicide and its Implications for Bioethics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):45 – 47.
  49.  20
    Justice, Medicine, and Medical Care.Rosamond Rhodes - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):32 – 33.
  50.  54
    Further Thoughts About Affective Forecasting Biases in Medicine: A Response to Nada Gligorov.Rosamond Rhodes & James J. Strain - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):174.
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