62 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Roy F. Baumeister [54]Roy Baumeister [7]Roy. Baumeister [1]
  1.  6
    You Didn’T Have to Do That: Belief in Free Will Promotes Gratitude.Michael J. Mackenzie, Kathleen D. Vohs & Roy Baumeister - 2014 - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 40 (11):1423-1434.
    Four studies tested the hypothesis that a weaker belief in free will would be related to feeling less gratitude. In Studies 1a and 1b, a trait measure of free will belief was positively correlated with a measure of dispositional gratitude. In Study 2, participants whose free will belief was weakened (vs. unchanged or bolstered) reported feeling less grateful for events in their past. Study 3 used a laboratory induction of gratitude. Participants with an experimentally reduced (vs. increased) belief in free (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  2.  6
    Conscious Thought is for Facilitating Social and Cultural Interactions: How Mental Simulations Serve the Animal–Culture Interface.Roy F. Baumeister & E. J. Masicampo - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (3):945-971.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  3.  7
    Free Will in Scientific Psychology.Roy F. Baumeister - 2008 - .
    Some actions are freer than others, and the difference is palpably important in terms of inner process, subjective perception, and social consequences. Psychology can study the difference between freer and less free actions without making dubious metaphysical commitments. Human evolution seems to have created a relatively new, more complex form of action control that corresponds to popular notions of free will. It is marked by self-control and rational choice, both of which are highly adaptive, especially for functioning within culture. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  4. Free Will in Everyday Life: Autobiographical Accounts of Free and Unfree Actions.Tyler F. Stillman, Roy F. Baumeister & Alfred R. Mele - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):381 - 394.
    What does free will mean to laypersons? The present investigation sought to address this question by identifying how laypersons distinguish between free and unfree actions. We elicited autobiographical narratives in which participants described either free or unfree actions, and the narratives were subsequently subjected to impartial analysis. Results indicate that free actions were associated with reaching goals, high levels of conscious thought and deliberation, positive outcomes, and moral behavior (among other things). These findings suggest that lay conceptions of free will (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  5.  8
    Personal Philosophy and Personnel Achievement: Belief in Free Will Predicts Better Job Performance.Tyler F. Stillman, Roy F. Baumeister, Kathleen D. Vohs, Nathaniel M. Lambert, Frank D. Fincham & Lauren E. Brewer - 2010 - .
    Do philosophic views affect job performance? The authors found that possessing a belief in free will predicted better career attitudes and actual job performance. The effect of free will beliefs on job performance indicators were over and above well-established predictors such as conscientiousness, locus of control, and Protestant work ethic. In Study 1, stronger belief in free will corresponded to more positive attitudes about expected career success. In Study 2, job performance was evaluated objectively and independently by a supervisor. Results (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  6. Free Will as Advanced Action Control for Human Social Life and Culture.Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni & Jessica L. Alquist - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (1):1-11.
    Free will can be understood as a novel form of action control that evolved to meet the escalating demands of human social life, including moral action and pursuit of enlightened self-interest in a cultural context. That understanding is conducive to scientific research, which is reviewed here in support of four hypotheses. First, laypersons tend to believe in free will. Second, that belief has behavioral consequences, including increases in socially and culturally desirable acts. Third, laypersons can reliably distinguish free actions from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  7. Homo Prospectus.Martin E. P. Seligman, Peter Railton, Roy F. Baumeister & Chandra Sripada - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Our species is misnamed. Though sapiens defines human beings as "wise" what humans do especially well is to prospect the future. We are homo prospectus. In this book, Martin E. P. Seligman, Peter Railton, Roy F. Baumeister, and Chandra Sripada argue it is anticipating and evaluating future possibilities for the guidance of thought and action that is the cornerstone of human success. Much of the history of psychology has been dominated by a framework in which people's behavior is driven by (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will.John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Do people have free will, or this universal belief an illusion? If free will is more than an illusion, what kind of free will do people have? How can free will influence behavior? Can free will be studied, verified, and understood scientifically? How and why might a sense of free will have evolved? These are a few of the questions this book attempts to answer. People generally act as though they believe in their own free will: they don't feel like (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  9.  10
    Relation of Threatened Egotism to Violence and Aggression: The Dark Side of High Self-Esteem.Roy F. Baumeister, Laura Smart & Joseph M. Boden - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (1):5-33.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  10.  23
    Ordinary People Think Free Will is a Lack of Constraint, Not the Presence of a Soul.Andrew J. Vonasch, Roy F. Baumeister & Alfred R. Mele - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 60:133-151.
    Four experiments supported the hypothesis that ordinary people understand free will as meaning unconstrained choice, not having a soul. People consistently rated free will as being high unless reduced by internal constraints (i.e., things that impaired people’s mental abilities to make choices) or external constraints (i.e., situations that hampered people’s abilities to choose and act as they desired). Scientific paradigms that have been argued to disprove free will were seen as reducing, but usually not eliminating free will, and the reductions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  8
    Making Punishment Palatable: Belief in Free Will Alleviates Punitive Distress.Cory J. Clark, Roy F. Baumeister & Peter H. Ditto - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 51:193-211.
  12.  4
    Recent Research on Free Will: Conceptualizations, Beliefs, and Processes.Roy Baumeister - 2014 - Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 50:1-52.
    This chapter summarizes research on free will. Progress has been made by discarding outmoded philosophical notions in favor of exploring how ordinary people understand and use the notion of free will. The concept of responsible autonomy captures many aspects of layperson concepts of free will, including acting on one's own (i.e., not driven by external forces), choosing, using reasons and personal values, conscious reflection, and knowing and accepting consequences and moral implications. Free will can thus be understood as form of (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  4
    Unjustified Side Effects Were Strongly Intended: Taboo Tradeoffs and the Side-Effect Effect.Andy Vonasch & Roy Baumeister - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 68:83-92.
    The side-effect effect is the seemingly irrational tendency for people to say harmful side effects were more intentional than helpful side effects of the same action. But the tendency may not be irrational. According to the Tradeoffs Justification Model, judgments of a person's intentions to cause harm depend on how that person decided to act, and on whether the reasons for acting justified causing the harmful consequences. Across three experiments (N = 660), unjustified harms were viewed as more intentional than (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  26
    Embodied Free Will Beliefs: Some Effects of Physical States on Metaphysical Opinions.Michael R. Ent & Roy F. Baumeister - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:147-154.
  15.  8
    Forget the Folk: Moral Responsibility Preservation Motives and Other Conditions for Compatibilism.Cory J. Clark, Bo M. Winegard & Roy F. Baumeister - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    For years, experimental philosophers have attempted to discern whether laypeople find free will compatible with a scientifically deterministic understanding of the universe, yet no consensus has emerged. The present work provides one potential explanation for these discrepant findings: People are strongly motivated to preserve free will and moral responsibility, and thus do not have stable, logically rigorous notions of free will. Seven studies support this hypothesis by demonstrating that a variety of logically irrelevant features influence compatibilist judgments. In Study 1, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  24
    Subjective Correlates and Consequences of Belief in Free Will.A. Will Crescioni, Roy F. Baumeister, Sarah E. Ainsworth, Michael Ent & Nathaniel M. Lambert - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):41-63.
    Four studies measured or manipulated beliefs in free will to illuminate how such beliefs are linked to other aspects of personality. Study 1 showed that stronger belief in free will was correlated with more gratitude, greater life satisfaction, lower levels of perceived life stress, a greater sense of self-efficacy, greater perceived meaning in life, higher commitment in relationships, and more willingness to forgive relationship partners. Study 2 showed that the belief in free will was a stronger predictor of life satisfaction, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  21
    The Experience of Freedom in Decisions – Questioning Philosophical Beliefs in Favor of Psychological Determinants.Stephan Lau, Anette Hiemisch & Roy F. Baumeister - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:30-46.
  18.  18
    Are Groups More or Less Than the Sum of Their Members? The Moderating Role of Individual Identification.Roy F. Baumeister, Sarah E. Ainsworth & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-38.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  41
    Free Will is About Choosing: The Link Between Choice and the Belief in Free Will.Gilad Feldman, Roy Baumeister & Kin Fai Wong - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 55:239-245.
    Expert opinions have yielded a wide and controversial assortment of conceptions of free will, but laypersons seem to associate free will more simply with making choices. We found that the more strongly people believed in free will, the more they liked making choices, the higher they rated their ability to make decisions (Study 1), the less difficult they perceived making decisions, and the more satisfied they were with their decisions (Study 2). High free will belief was also associated with more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20. Believing Versus Disbelieving in Free Will: Correlates and Consequences.Roy Baumeister - 2012 - Personality and Social Psychology Compass 6 (10):736-745.
    Some people believe more than others in free will, and researchers have both measured and manipulated those beliefs. Disbelief in free will has been shown to cause dishonest, selfish, aggressive, and conforming behavior, and to reduce helpfulness, learning from one’s misdeeds, thinking for oneself, recycling, expectations for occupational success, and actual quality of performance on the job. Belief in free will has been shown to have only modest or negligible correlations with other variables, indicating that it is a distinct trait. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  21. Free Will, Consciousness, and Cultural Animals.Roy F. Baumeister - 2008 - In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22.  4
    Conscious Thought Does Not Guide Moment-to-Moment Actions—It Serves Social and Cultural Functions.E. J. Masicampo & Roy F. Baumeister - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  11
    Are Morally Good Actions Ever Free?Cory J. Clark, Adam Shniderman, Jamie B. Luguri, Roy F. Baumeister & Peter H. Ditto - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 63:161-182.
  24.  25
    Bad is Freer Than Good: Positive–Negative Asymmetry in Attributions of Free Will.Gilad Feldman, Kin Fai Ellick Wong & Roy F. Baumeister - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:26-40.
    Recent findings support the idea that the belief in free will serves as the basis for moral responsibility, thus promoting the punishment of immoral agents. We theorized that free will extends beyond morality to serve as the basis for accountability and the capacity for change more broadly, not only for others but also for the self. Five experiments showed that people attributed higher freedom of will to negative than to positive valence, regardless of morality or intent, for both self and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work?Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.) - 2010 - University Press.
    This volume is aimed at readers who wish to move beyond debates about the existence of free will and the efficacy of consciousness and closer to appreciating ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  35
    Suicide as Escape From Self.Roy F. Baumeister - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (1):90-113.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  27. Time and Decision. Economic and Psychological Perspectives on Intertemporal Choice.George Loewenstein, Daniel Read & Roy F. Baumeister - 2006 - Erkenntnis 64 (3):419-422.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28.  29
    Self-Regulation and the Executive Function of the Self.Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2003 - In Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.), Handbook of Self and Identity. Guilford Press. pp. 1--197.
  29.  7
    Unable to Resist the Temptation to Tell the Truth or to Lie for the Organization? Identification Makes the Difference.Carolin Baur, Roman Soucek, Ulrich Kühnen & Roy F. Baumeister - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Previous research indicates that the depletion of self-regulatory resources can promote unethical behavior that benefits the self. Extending this literature, we focus on norm-transgressing behavior that is intended to primarily benefit others. In particular, we predicted a differing effect of self-regulatory resource depletion on dishonesty that benefits one’s group, depending on the degree of identification with the group. Following a dual process approach, we argue that if identification with the group is strong, then people may have an automatic inclination to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  11
    Free Will and Consciousness: An Introduction and Overview of Perspectives.Alfred Mele, Kathleen Vohs & Roy Baumeister - 2010 - In A. Mele, R. Baumeister & K. Vohs (eds.), Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? Oxford University Press.
    This volume is aimed at readers who wish to move beyond debates about the existence of free will and the efficacy of consciousness and closer to appreciating how free will and consciousness might operate. It draws from philosophy and psychology, the two fields that have grappled most fundamentally with these issues. In this wide-ranging volume, the contributors explore such issues as how free will is connected to rational choice, planning, and self-control; roles for consciousness in decision making; the nature and (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  52
    Time and Decision: Economic and Psychological Perspectives on Intertemporal Choice.George Loewenstein, Daniel Read & Roy Baumeister (eds.) - 2003 - Russell Sage Foundation.
    Introduction George Loewenstein, Daniel Read, and Roy F. Baumeister P _L sychology and economics have a classic love-hate relationship. ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32.  24
    How Often Does Currently Felt Emotion Predict Social Behavior and Judgment? A Meta-Analytic Test of Two Theories.C. Nathan DeWall, Roy F. Baumeister, David S. Chester & Brad J. Bushman - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (2):136-143.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Free Will Evolved for Morality and Culture.Andrew E. Monroe, Kathleen D. Vohs & Roy F. Baumeister - 2016 - In Arthur G. Miller (ed.), The Social Psychology of Good and Evil. Guilford Publications.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  20
    3 Understanding Free Will and Consciousness on the Basis ofCurrent Research Findings in Psychology.Roy F. Baumeister - 2010 - In Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.), Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? University Press. pp. 24.
  35.  20
    Individual Identity and Freedom of Choice in the Context of Environmental and Economic Conditions.Roy F. Baumeister, Jina Park & Sarah E. Ainsworth - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):484 - 484.
    Van de Vliert's findings fit nicely with our recent arguments implying that (1) differentiated selfhood is partly motivated by requirements of cultural groups, and (2) free will mainly exists within culture. Some cultural groups promote individual freedom, whereas others constrict it so as to maintain elites' power and privilege. Thus, freedom is, to a great extent, a creation of culture.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Advanced Social Psychology: The State of the Science.Roy F. Baumeister & Eli J. Finkel (eds.) - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    Social psychology is a flourishing discipline. It explores the most essential questions of the human psyche, and it does so with clever, ingenuitive research methods. This edited volume is a textbook for advanced social psychology courses. Its primary target audience is first-year graduate students in social psychlogy, although it is also appropriate for upper-level undergraduate courses in social psychology and for doctoral students in disciplines connecting to social psychology. The authors of the chapters are world-renowned leaders on their topic, and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. The Collective Invention of Language to Access the Universe of Possible Ideas.Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):675-676.
    Thought uses meaning but not necessarily language. Meaning, in the form of a set of possible concepts and ideas, is a nonphysical reality that lay waiting for brains to become smart enough to represent these ideas. Thus, the brain evolved, whereas meaning was discovered, and language was invented – collectively – as a tool to help the brain use meaning.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  4
    Foraging Extends Beyond Food: Hoarding of Mental Energy and Information Seeking in Response to Uncertainty.Jessica L. Alquist & Roy F. Baumeister - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  14
    Ego-Depletion, Self-Control, and Choice.Kathleen D. Vohs & Roy F. Baumeister - 2004 - In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. pp. 15--398.
  40.  3
    Differentiation of Individual Selves Facilitates Group-Level Benefits of Ultrasociality.Sarah E. Ainsworth, Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  15
    Arguing, Reasoning, and the Interpersonal (Cultural) Functions of Human Consciousness.Roy F. Baumeister, E. J. Masicampo & C. Nathan DeWall - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):74-74.
    Our recent work suggests that (1) the purpose of human conscious thought is participation in social and cultural groups, and (2) logical reasoning depends on conscious thought. These mesh well with the argument theory of reasoning. In broader context, the distinctively human traits are adaptations for culture and inner processes serve interpersonal functions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Introduction: Psychology and Free Will.John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister - 2008 - In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  24
    Maybe It Helps to Be Conscious, After All.Roy F. Baumeister, Kathleen D. Vohs & E. J. Masicampo - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):20-21.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  86
    Praise: More Than Just Social Reinforcement.Catherine R. Delin & Roy F. Baumeister - 1994 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (3):219–241.
    Praise is a common feature of interpersonal interaction. It is used to encourage, socialize, ingratiate, seduce, reward, and influence other people. These assorted usages reflect a widespread belief in the efficacy of praise for altering the behaviour and affective state of the recipient. Despite this assumed power of praise, and despite its salience and frequency in human social interaction, research interest in praise has been sporadic and intermittent, and not united within an all-embracing theoretical model.In this article we will present (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  2
    Differentiating Selves Facilitates Group Outcomes.Sarah E. Ainsworth, Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  8
    Power Increases the Socially Toxic Component of Narcissism Among Individuals with High Baseline Testosterone.Nicole L. Mead, Roy F. Baumeister, Anika Stuppy & Kathleen D. Vohs - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (4):591-596.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  4
    On the Necessity of Consciousness for Sophisticated Human Action.Roy F. Baumeister, Stephan Lau, Heather M. Maranges & Cory J. Clark - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  30
    Cooperation and Fairness Depend on Self-Regulation.Sarah E. Ainsworth & Roy F. Baumeister - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):79-80.
    Any evolved disposition for fairness and cooperation would not replace but merely compete with selfish and other antisocial impulses. Therefore, we propose that human cooperation and fairness depend on self-regulation. Evidence shows reductions in fairness and other prosocial tendencies when self-regulation fails.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  30
    Transcendence, Guilt, and Self-Control.Roy F. Baumeister - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):122-123.
    Transcendence, defined as the capacity to perceive the immediate stimulus environment in relation to long-range or abstract concerns, is a key aspect of self-control, and indeed self-regulation often breaks down because attention becomes focused exclusively on the immediate stimuli (i.e., transcendence fails). Factors that restrict attention to the here and now will weaken self-control, whereas factors that promote transcendence will enhance it. Guilt may be one example of the latter.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  50
    Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries.Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni & Jessica L. Alquist - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (1):31-34.
    Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries Content Type Journal Article Pages 31-34 DOI 10.1007/s12152-010-9067-3 Authors Roy F. Baumeister, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA A. William Crescioni, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Jessica L. Alquist, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Journal Neuroethics Online ISSN 1874-5504 Print ISSN 1874-5490 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 62