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  1. A Yogācāra Buddhist Theory of Metaphor.Roy Tzohar - 2018 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    The Yogacara school of Buddhist thought claims that all language-use is metaphorical. Exploring the profound implications of this assertion, Roy Tzhoar makes the case for viewing the Yogacara account as a full-fledged theory of meaning, one that is not merely linguistic, but also applicable both in the world and in texts.
     
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    Imagine Being a Preta: Early Indian Yogācāra Approaches to Intersubjectivity.Roy Tzohar - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):337-354.
    The paper deals with the early Yogācāra strategies for explaining intersubjective agreement under a ‘mere representations’ view. Examining Vasubandhu, Asaṅga, and Sthiramati’s use of the example of intersubjective agreement among the hungry ghosts, it is demonstrated that in contrast to the way in which it was often interpreted by contemporary scholars, this example in fact served these Yogācāra thinkers to perform an ironic inversion of the realist premise—showing that intersubjective agreement not only does not require the existence of mind-independent objects (...)
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    Does Early Yogācāra Have a Theory of Meaning? Sthiramati’s Arguments on Metaphor in the Triṃśikā-Bhāṣya.Roy Tzohar - 2017 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 45 (1):99-120.
    Can the early Yogācāra be said to present a systematic theory of meaning? The paper argues that Sthiramati’s bhāṣya on Vasubandhu’s Triṃśikā, in which he argues that all language-use is metaphorical, indeed amounts to such a theory, both because of the text’s engagement with the wider Indian philosophical conversation about reference and meaning and by virtue of the questions it addresses and its motivations. Through a translation and analysis of key sections of Sthiramati’s commentary I present the main features of (...)
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    A Tree in Bloom or a Tree Stripped Bare: Ways of Seeing in Aśvaghoṣa’s Life of the Buddha.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):313-326.
    Both of Aśvaghoṣa’s poetical works conclude with somewhat apologetic statements regarding his use of kāvya to deliver the Buddha’s words. Previous studies of his work have often read these statements as empty rhetoric, designed to assuage the typically suspicious attitude of the Buddhist canon toward kāvya, which consists in language beatified through ornamentation for the sole purpose of pleasure. This paper suggests that we should take Aśvaghoṣa’s statements seriously, and that indeed his poetry can be understood as conducive for liberation. (...)
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    Contemporary Non-Conceptualism, Conceptual Inclusivism, and the Yogācāra View of Language Use as Skillful Action.Roy Tzohar - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):638-660.
    According to the early Yogācāra, following non-conceptual awareness, the advanced bodhisattva is said to attain a state characterized by a "subsequent awareness". Yogācāra thinkers identify this state with ultimate knowledge of causality and view it as involving a unique kind of conceptual activity and propositional attitudes, which are very different, however, from ordinary conceptual awareness insofar as they do not involve vikalpa. Translated back into the terms of some version of the contemporary debate between conceptualists and nonconceptualists, this would amount (...)
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    Preamble.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Sophia 58 (1):55-55.
  7.  11
    Reading Aśvaghoṣa Across Boundaries: An Introduction.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):187-194.
    The prominence and the importance of Aśvaghoṣa’s works and persona—to the understanding of the history of Sanskrit poetry, to the understanding of Indian Buddhism in a transitional stage and to its introduction to other parts of Asia—is well acknowledged in contemporary scholarship. But with few exceptions the existing scholarship on Aśvaghoṣa has tended to be highly specialized and focused, inviting further reading that builds on this in-depth research to offer an integrated treatment of the variegated aspects and contexts of his (...)
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  8.  13
    The Buddhist Philosophical Conception of Intersubjectivity: An Introduction.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Sophia 58 (1):57-60.