Results for 'Royal Society'

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  1. A Discourse of Things Above Reason Inquiring Whether a Philosopher Should Admit There Are Any Such. By a Fellow of the Royal Society to Which Are Annexed by the Publisher Some Advices About Judging of Things Said to Transcend Reason. Written by a Fellow of the Same Society.Robert Boyle & Fellow of the Same Society - 1681 - Printed by E.T. And R.H. For Jonathan Robinson at the Golden Lion in S. Paul's Church-Yard.
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  2.  7
    Etienne-François Geoffroy, entre la Royal Society et l'Académie royale des sciences : ni Newton, ni Descartes.Bernard Joly - 2012 - Methodos 12.
    Etienne-François Geoffroy, l’un des chimistes français les plus importants du début du XVIIIe siècle, entretenait des relations régulières avec l’Angleterre. Il était chargé de développer les échanges entre l’Académie royale des sciences et la Royal Society de Londres. Quand il publia sa « Table des rapports entre les substances chimiques » en 1718, Fontenelle et quelques autres lui reprochèrent d’avoir introduit en chimie le système des attractions newtoniennes. Mais en fait, Geoffroy s’est toujours tenu à l’écart aussi bien (...)
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  3.  23
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
  4. Spectacles Improved to Perfection and Approved of by the Royal Society.D. J. Bryden & D. L. Simms - 1993 - Annals of Science 50 (1):1-32.
    The letter sent by the Royal Society to the London optician, John Marshall, in 1694, commending his new method of grinding, has been reprinted, and referred to, in recent years. However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the method itself, the letter and the circumstances in which it was written, nor the consequences for trade practices. The significance of the approval by the Royal Society of this innovation and the use of that approbation by John (...)
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  5.  11
    Compiling Nature's History: Travellers and Travel Narratives in the Early Royal Society.Daniel Carey - 1997 - Annals of Science 54 (3):269-292.
    The relationship between travel, travel narrative, and the enterprise of natural history is explored, focusing on activities associated with the early Royal Society. In an era of expanding travel, for colonial, diplomatic, trade, and missionary purposes, reports of nature's effects proliferated, both in oral and written forms. Naturalists intent on compiling a comprehensive history of such phenomena, and making them useful in the process, readily incorporated these reports into their work. They went further by trying to direct the (...)
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  6.  22
    Some Early Ethics of Geoengineering the Climate: A Commentary on the Values of the Royal Society Report.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2011 - Environmental Values 20 (2):163 - 188.
    The Royal Society's landmark report on geoengineering is predicated on a particular account of the context and rationale for intentional manipulation of the climate system, and this ethical framework probably explains many of the Society's conclusions. Critical reflection on the report's values is useful for understanding disagreements within and about geoengineering policy, and also for identifying questions for early ethical analysis. Topics discussed include the moral hazard argument, governance, the ethical status of geoengineering under different rationales, the (...)
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  7. A Questionable Project: Herbert McLeod and the Making of the Fourth Series of the Royal Society Catalogue of Scientific Papers, 1901–25. [REVIEW]Hannah Gay - 2013 - Annals of Science 70 (2):149-174.
    Summary Many people were involved in producing the seven volumes that make up the fourth series of the Royal Society catalogue of scientific papers. Included were about two hundred volunteers and about one hundred people working either on short-term contracts or carrying out piece work. At the Royal Society there was a small, largely female, secretariat working full-time. It included both clerical and bibliographic staff. Coordinating all the work was the chemist Herbert McLeod, appointed director of (...)
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  8.  2
    Robert Boyle and the Early Royal Society: A Reciprocal Exchange in the Making of Baconian Science.Michael Hunter - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):1-23.
    This paper documents an important development in Robert Boyle's natural-philosophical method – his use from the 1660s onwards of ‘heads’ and ‘inquiries’ as a means of organizing his data, setting himself an agenda when studying a subject and soliciting information from others. Boyle acknowledged that he derived this approach from Francis Bacon, but he had not previously used it in his work, and the reason why it came to the fore when it did is not apparent from his printed and (...)
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  9.  7
    Sir Robert Sibbald, Kt, The Royal Society of Scotland and the Origins of the Scottish Enlightenment.Roger L. Emerson - 1988 - Annals of Science 45 (1):41-72.
    This paper shows that in late seventeenth-century Scotland there existed a sizeable virtuoso community whose leaders were abreast of European developments in philosophy, history and science. Moreover, by c. 1700, Sir Robert Sibbald was attempting to organize a learned society modelled upon those he knew in Europe and upon London's Royal Society. The interests of the virtuosi and their attempts to institutionalize their pursuits laid much of the ground work for the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal (...) of Scotland which Sir Robert hoped to found never became a reality, but the academic ideals which he propounded came to fruition in the Philosophical Society of Edinburgh and later bodies such as the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. The intellectual inquiries and achievements of Sir Robert and his friends, particularly those in medicine and natural history, continued to be of interest to later Scots. They, thanks in part to the influence of the Newtonian physician Archibald Pitcaire, improved upon Sibbald's naïve Baconianism, but to a surprising degree their concerns had also been his. (shrink)
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  10.  19
    The Making of Extraordinary Facts: Authentication of Singularities of Nature at the Royal Society of London in the First Half of the Eighteenth Century.Palmira Fontes da Costa - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):265-288.
    This paper is concerned with the particular problems raised by observations of phenomena outside the common course of nature for their validation as knowledge. It examines to what extent the content of the reports and, in particular, their lack of intrinsic plausibility affected the methods used in their authentication and the assessment of testimony at the Royal Society in the first half of the eighteenth century. I show that literary strategies were usually necessary but not sufficient for the (...)
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  11.  1
    Methodology and Apologetics: Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society.P. B. Wood - 1980 - British Journal for the History of Science 13 (1):1-26.
    Central to Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society was the description and justification of the method adopted and advocated by the Fellows of the Society, for it was thought that it was their method which distinguished them from ancients, dogmatists, sceptics, and contemporary natural philosophers such as Descartes. The Fellows saw themselves as furthering primarily a novel method, rather than a system, of philosophy, and the History gave expression to this corporate self-perception. However, the History's description (...)
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  12.  2
    Scientists in Society: The Royal Society of South Africa.Jane Carruthers - 2008 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 63 (1):1-30.
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  13.  3
    Property, Patronage, and the Politics of Science: The Founding of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.Steven Shapin - 1974 - British Journal for the History of Science 7 (1):1-41.
    The institutionalization of natural knowledge in the form of a scientific society may be interpreted in several ways. If we wish to view science as something apart, unchanging in its intellectual nature, we may regard the scientific enterprise as presenting to the sustaining social system a number of absolute and necessary organizational demands: for example, scientific activity requires acceptance as an important social activity valued for its own sake, that is, it requires autonomy; it is separate from other forms (...)
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  14.  3
    Between Hostile Camps: Sir Humphry Davy's Presidency of The Royal Society of London, 1820–1827.David Miller - 1983 - British Journal for the History of Science 16 (1):1-47.
    The career of Humphry Davy is one of the fairy tales of early nineteenth-century British science. His rise from obscure Cornish origins to world-wide eminence as a chemical discoverer, to popular celebrity amongst London's scientific audiences, to a knighthood from the Prince Regent, and finally to the Presidency of the Royal Society, provide apposite material for Smilesian accounts of British society as open to talents. But the use of Davy's career to illustrate the thesis that ‘genius will (...)
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  15.  2
    The Usefulness of Natural Philosophy: The Royal Society and the Culture of Practical Utility in the Later Eighteenth Century.David Miller - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Science 32 (2):185-201.
    From its very beginning the Royal Society was regarded by many, if not most, of its founders as centrally concerned with practical improvement. How could it be otherwise? The study of nature was not only a pious act in and of itself – a reading of the book of nature – but it was also the way in which God's Providence would provide discoveries for the relief of man's estate. The early ideologues of the Society, such as (...)
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  16.  19
    Henry Oldenburg: Shaping the Royal Society.Franco Giudice - 2007 - Early Science and Medicine 12 (1):107-108.
    Book review of Marie Boas Hall, Henry Oldenburg: Shaping the Royal Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. xii + 369.
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    The ‘New Experimental Philosophy’: The Royal Society in the Twentieth Century - An Interview with Sir George Porter.Ian Thompson & Daniel Caute - 1987 - Cogito 1 (2):1-4.
    Sir George Porter is one of the country's leading scientists. In 1967 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the chemistry of molecular synthesis caused by light. He is currently President of both the Royal Society and is immediate Past President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science.
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  18. The Royal Society of South Africa.W. P. U. Jackson - 1990 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 47 (3):363-363.
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  19.  8
    Virtuosity and the Early Royal Society of London.Jessica Ratcliff - 2011 - Metascience 20 (3):569-571.
    Virtuosity and the early Royal Society of London Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9506-0 Authors Jessica Ratcliff, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 501 E. Daniel St, Champaign, II 61820, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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    Food for Thought?: The Relations Between the Royal Society Food Committees and Government, 1915-19.Andrew J. Hull - 2002 - Annals of Science 59 (3):263-298.
    This paper traces the relationship between the food committees of the Royal Society and government during the First World War, concentrating on the period up to the resignation of Lord Devonport as first Food Controller. It argues that, in the context of a radical public science discourse emanating from some sections of the scientific community and greatly increased contacts between scientists and government, the food scientists of the committees were moved to press for a formalization of the committees' (...)
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    Three Lenses by Constantine Huygens in the Possession of the Royal Society of London.A. A. Mills & M. L. Jones - 1989 - Annals of Science 46 (2):173-182.
    The Royal Society possesses three long-focus simple lenses of diameters 195, 210 and 230 mm, all inscribed with the signature ‘C. Huygens’ and various dates in the year 1686. These prove to have been made by Constantine Huygens, the elder brother of the famous Christiaan Huygens. All three lenses have been examined by a variety of physical and chemical methods, both to define their optical characteristics and to establish the composition of dated samples of late-seventeenth-century Continental glass. The (...)
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  22.  1
    The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1975 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 41 (3):324-324.
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  23.  1
    The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1969 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 38 (4):xiv-xiv.
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  24.  1
    The Royal Society of South Africa.M. A. Cluver - 1993 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 48 (2):i-v.
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  25.  1
    Royal Society of South Africa. President's Address.S. S. Hough - 1910 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 2 (1):45-58.
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  26.  1
    Royal Society of South Africa. Presidential Address.S. S. Hough - 1910 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 2 (1):419-427.
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    Le programme « baconien » des chimistes de la Royal Society.Luc Peterschmitt - 2008 - Methodos 8.
    La réception de la philosophie naturelle de Bacon est une réception tronquée, y compris et surtout chez ceux qui se disent baconiens, en particulier à la Royal Society. Nous expliquons ce décalage, en montrant la fonction de la référence à Bacon, à propos de la chimie : même s’il n’est pas authentique, le baconisme de la Royal Society libère un espace théorique pour la chimie, puisqu’il interdit tout a priori portant sur ce que l’on peut admettre (...)
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  28.  1
    End‐of‐Life Decision‐Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End‐of‐Life Decision‐Making.Johannes J. M. Van Delden Udo SchÜklenk - 2011 - Bioethics 25:1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 (...)
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  29. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1969 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 38 (2):201-201.
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  30. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1971 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 40 (1):34-34.
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  31. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1974 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 41 (1):98-98.
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  32. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1972 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 40 (5):405-405.
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  33. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1975 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 41 (4):434-434.
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  34. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1978 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 43 (1):95-95.
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  35. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1978 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 43 (2):219-219.
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  36. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1983 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 45 (1):114-114.
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  37. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1970 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 39 (1):109-109.
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  38. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1969 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 38 (3):304-304.
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  39. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1970 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 39 (2):222-222.
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  40. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1971 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 39 (4):444-444.
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  41. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1971 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 39 (3):354-354.
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  42. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1972 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 40 (2):109-109.
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  43. The Royal Society of South Africa.A. C. Brown - 1972 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 40 (3):209-209.
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  44. Creating the Royal Society's Sylvester Medal.Geoffrey Cantor - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (1):75-92.
    Following the death of James Joseph Sylvester in 1897, contributions were collected in order to mark his life and work by a suitable memorial. This initiative resulted in the Sylvester Medal, which is awarded triennially by the Royal Society for the encouragement of research into pure mathematics. Ironically the main advocate for initiating this medal was not a fellow mathematician but the chemist and naturalist Raphael Meldola. Religion, not mathematics, provided the link between Meldola and Sylvester; they were (...)
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  45. Royal Society of South Africa.R. M. Catchwle - 1986 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 46 (2):i-v.
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  46. Abstracts of Contributions to the Royal Society Symposium on Meso-Scale Processes in the Atmosphere and the Sea in a Coastal Environment. September 1978.J. G. Field - 1979 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 44 (1):127-127.
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  47. The Medical Understanding of Monstrous Births at the Royal Society of London During the First Half of the Eighteenth Century.Fontes da Costa Palmira - 2004 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (2):157-175.
    The fact that monstrous births were not represented in independent learned publications of the eighteenth century, except for the case of hermaphrodites, does not mean that the interest in them had disappeared or that they were no more considered proper objects of inquiry. This paper focuses on the medical understanding of monstrosity at the Royal Society of London. I point to the use of monstrous births in strengthening the authority of medical practitioners and lecturers. I also show some (...)
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  48. The Royal Society of South Africa.W. Gevers - 1990 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 47 (3):i-vi.
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  49. The Royal Society of South Africa.W. Gevers - 1992 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 48 (1):i-vi.
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  50. Royal Society of South Africa Minutes of Proceedings 1982.A. V. Hall - 1983 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 45 (1):i-vi.
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