Results for 'Rungpaka Amy Tiwsakul Chris Hackley'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  62
    An Ethical Evaluation of Product Placement: A Deceptive Practice?Chris Hackley, Rungpaka Amy Tiwsakul & Lutz Preuss - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):109–120.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  12
    An Ethical Evaluation of Product Placement: A Deceptive Practice?Chris Hackley, Rungpaka Amy Tiwsakul & Lutz Preuss - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (2):109-120.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  17
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Chris Walmsley, Karolina Staros, Amanda Meyer, Amy Ing, Andrew Evans, Wayne Fuqua, David Hartmann & Thomas Valey - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical tensions in research. The method employed was “protocol analysis,” a talk-aloud technique pioneered by cognitive scientists for the analysis of expert performance. The participants were asked to verbalize their normally unexpressed thought processes as they responded to the scenarios, and to make recommendations for courses of action. We found that experts spent more time (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  5
    Review Article: In Trusts We Trust.Chris Hackley - 2000 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 9 (2):119–121.
    Book reviewed in this article:Marchand, Roland Creating the Corporate Soul: The rise of public relations and corporate imagery in American big business.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  18
    When Extremists Win: Cultural Transmission Via Iterated Learning When Populations Are Heterogeneous.Danielle J. Navarro, Amy Perfors, Arthur Kary, Scott D. Brown & Chris Donkin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2108-2149.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  2
    Editorial: Texts of Reinvention.Chris Hackley - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (4):203–205.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  8
    Media Ethics.Chris Hackley - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (2):134–137.
    John Corner, Philip Schlesinger and Roger Silverstone , International Media Research – a critical surveyMatthew Kieran , Media Ethics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  20
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Thomas Van Valey, David Hartmann, Wayne Fuqua, Andrew Evans, Amy Day Ing, Amanda Meyer, Karolina Staros & Chris Walmsley - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical tensions in research. The method employed was “protocol analysis,” a talk-aloud technique pioneered by cognitive scientists for the analysis of expert performance. The participants were asked to verbalize their normally unexpressed thought processes as they responded to the scenarios, and to make recommendations for courses of action. We found that experts spent more time (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  62
    The Contemporary Frankfurt School's Eurocentrism Unveiled: The Contribution of Amy Allen.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
    In her latest book, The End of Progress, Amy Allen embarks on an ambitious and much-needed project: to decolonize contemporary Frankfurt School Critical Theory. As with all of her books, this is an exceptionally well-written and well-argued book. Allen strives to avoid making assertions without backing them up via close and careful textual reading of the thinkers she engages in her book. In this article, I will state why this book makes a central contribution to contemporary critical theory (in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  24
    Amy Sue Bix. Girls Coming to Tech! A History of American Engineering Education for Women. Xii + 360 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2013. $34. [REVIEW]Amy E. Foster - 2015 - Isis 106 (1):207-208.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  33
    Book Reviews: Old Europe, New Europe, Core Europe: Transatlantic Relations After the Iraq War: Edited by D. Levy, M. Pensky and J. Torpey London: Verso, 2005 Reviewed by Chris Rumford. [REVIEW]Chris Rumford - 2007 - Theory, Culture and Society 24 (3):169-173.
  12.  65
    Chris Wickham’s Framing the Early Middle Ages.Chris Harman - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (1):98-108.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  31
    Chris Ware, Conference Poster, “Comics: Philosophy and Practice,” May 2012.Chris Ware - 2014 - Critical Inquiry 40 (3):Foldout-Foldout.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  59
    Liberating Critical Theory: Eurocentrism, Normativity, and Capitalism: Symposium on Amy Allen’s The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory, Columbia University Press, 2016.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
    In her latest book, The End of Progress, Amy Allen embarks on an ambitious and much-needed project: to decolonize contemporary Frankfurt School Critical Theory. As with all of her books, this is an exceptionally well-written and well-argued book. Allen strives to avoid making assertions without backing them up via close and careful textual reading of the thinkers she engages in her book. In this article, I will state why this book makes a central contribution to contemporary critical theory (in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  1
    The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    While post- and decolonial theorists have thoroughly debunked the idea of historical progress as a Eurocentric, imperialist, and neocolonialist fallacy, many of the most prominent contemporary thinkers associated with the Frankfurt School--Jürgen Habermas, Axel Honneth, and Rainer Forst--have persistently defended ideas of progress, development, and modernity and have even made such ideas central to their normative claims. Can the Frankfurt School's goal of radical social change survive this critique? And what would a decolonized critical theory look like? Amy Allen fractures (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  16.  51
    Emancipation, Progress, Critique: Debating Amy Allen’s The End of Progress.Albena Azmanova, Martin Saar, Guilel Treiber, Azar Dakwar, Noëlle McAfee, Andrew Feenberg & Amy Allen - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (4):511-541.
  17.  17
    Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading.Amy Coplan - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):94-97.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   268 citations  
  18. Knowledge Through Imagination.Amy Kind & Peter Kung (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Imagination is celebrated as our vehicle for escape from the mundane here and now. It transports us to distant lands of magic and make-believe, and provides us with diversions during boring meetings or long bus rides. Yet the focus on imagination as a means of escape from the real world minimizes the fact that imagination seems also to furnish us with knowledge about it. Imagination seems an essential component in our endeavor to learn about the world in which we live--whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  19.  6
    Organic Petrology of Peak Oil Maturity Triassic Yanchang Formation Lacustrine Mudrocks, Ordos Basin, China.Paul C. Hackley, Lixia Zhang & Tongwei Zhang - 2017 - Interpretation: SEG 5 (2):SF211-SF223.
    An organic petrology evaluation and a determination of solid bitumen reflectance [Formula: see text] were completed for organic-rich Triassic Yanchang Formation mudrocks from the Ordos Basin, north-central China, as part of a larger investigation of “shale gas” resources. These data were integrated with information from Rock-Eval programmed pyrolysis to show that the samples are in the peak oil window of thermal maturity and that organic matter is dominated by solid bitumen with minor amounts of type III kerogen from vascular land (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Models of Cognitive Development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  21.  27
    The Learnability of Abstract Syntactic Principles.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Terry Regier - 2011 - Cognition 118 (3):306-338.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  22.  23
    Vexing, Veiled, and Inequitable: Social Distancing and the “Rights” Divide in the Age of COVID-19.Amy Fairchild, Lawrence Gostin & Ronald Bayer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):55-61.
    Although unprecedented in scope and beyond all our life experiences, sweeping social distancing measures are not without historical precedent. Historically, racism, stigma, and discrimination resul...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  23. The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity.Amy Allen - 1999 - Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression. In "The Power of Feminist Theory," Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of theorists of power, including (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  24.  53
    Ethical Perspectives on the Postmodern Communications Leviathan.Christopher E. Hackley & Philip J. Kitchen - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 20 (1):15 - 26.
    Advertising and other forms of promotional activity have proliferated to such an extent that they may constitute a form of social pollution (Kitchen, 1994). The quantity and tone of communications to which consumers are exposed may have a subtle but pervasive effect on the social ecology of the developed world. Not only are Marketing Communications delivered in unprecedented quantities (Kitchen, 1994); but their tone is increasingly difficult to categorise in the Postmodern Marketing era (Brown, 1994). Notably, there has been very (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25. Persons and Personal Identity.Amy Kind - 2015 - Polity.
    As persons, we are importantly different from all other creatures in the universe. But in what, exactly, does this difference consist? What kinds of entities are we, and what makes each of us the same person today that we were yesterday? Could we survive having all of our memories erased and replaced with false ones? What about if our bodies were destroyed and our brains were transplanted into android bodies, or if instead our minds were simply uploaded to computers? -/- (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26.  62
    The Positive Ethical Organization: Enacting a Living Code of Ethics and Ethical Organizational Identity.Amy Klemm Verbos, Joseph A. Gerard, Paul R. Forshey, Charles S. Harding & Janice S. Miller - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):17-33.
    A vision of a living code of ethics is proposed to counter the emphasis on negative phenomena in the study of organizational ethics. The living code results from the harmonious interaction of authentic leadership, five key organizational processes (attraction–selection–attrition, socialization, reward systems, decision-making and organizational learning), and an ethical organizational culture (characterized by heightened levels of ethical awareness and a positive climate regarding ethics). The living code is the cognitive, affective, and behavioral manifestation of an ethical organizational identity. We draw (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  27.  1
    Book Review: Wannabes, Goths, and Christians: The Boundaries of Sex, Style, and Status. By Amy C. Wilkins. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2008, 256 Pp., $55.00 (Cloth); $22.00. [REVIEW]Amy L. Best - 2008 - Gender and Society 22 (2):261-262.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  44
    Letter From London, on Chris Petit, Abbas Kiarostami, Lynne Ramsay, Iain Sinclair, J. G. Ballard, and Surveillance Cinema.Chris Darke - 2003 - Film-Philosophy 7 (1).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  83
    Democracy and Disagreement.Amy Gutmann - 1996 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    The authors offer ways to encourage and educate Americans to participate in the public deliberations that make democracy work and lay out the principles of..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  30. Ordinary Objects.Amie Thomasson (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Arguments that ordinary inanimate objects such as tables and chairs, sticks and stones, simply do not exist have become increasingly common and increasingly prominent. Some are based on demands for parsimony or for a non-arbitrary answer to the special composition question; others arise from prohibitions against causal redundancy, ontological vagueness, or co-location; and others still come from worries that a common sense ontology would be a rival to a scientific one. Until now, little has been done to address these arguments (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   123 citations  
  31. Fairness, Free-Riding and Rainforest Protection.Chris Armstrong - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (1):106-130.
    If dangerous climate change is to be avoided, it is vital that carbon sinks such as tropical rainforests are protected. But protecting them has costs. These include opportunity costs: the potential economic benefits which those who currently control rainforests have to give up when they are protected. But who should bear those costs? Should countries which happen to have rainforests within their territories sacrifice their own economic development, because of our broader global interests in protecting key carbon sinks? This essay (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  32.  45
    Real Natures and Familiar Objects.Amie L. Thomasson - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):518-523.
    Crawford Elder’s Real Natures and Familiar Objects promises to give naturalistically inclined metaphysicians reason to accept an ontology that includes many common sense objects, including persons, organisms, and at least many artifacts, behaviors, customs, and so on. This is a brave book, running against the current of trends towards austerity in ontology, tackling centuries old problems about how modal facts may be empirically discovered, and defending a commonsense ontology from a strictly naturalistic approach rather than via traditional appeals to ordinary (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  33. Artifacts and Human Concepts.Amie Thomasson - manuscript
    Creations of the Mind: Essays on Artifacts and their Representation, ed. Stephen Laurence and Eric Margolis, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  34. Why Open-Minded People Should Endorse Dogmatism.Chris Tucker - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):529-545.
    Open-minded people should endorse dogmatism because of its explanatory power. Dogmatism holds that, in the absence of defeaters, a seeming that P necessarily provides non-inferential justification for P. I show that dogmatism provides an intuitive explanation of four issues concerning non-inferential justification. It is particularly impressive that dogmatism can explain these issues because prominent epistemologists have argued that it can’t address at least two of them. Prominent epistemologists also object that dogmatism is absurdly permissive because it allows a seeming to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  35.  2
    Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor.Amy Mullin - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This highly original book argues for increased recognition of pregnancy, birthing and childrearing as social activities demanding simultaneously physical, intellectual, emotional and moral work from those who undertake them. Amy Mullin considers both parenting and paid childcare, and examines the impact of disability on this work. The first chapters contest misconceptions about pregnancy and birth such as the idea that pregnancy is only valued for its end result, and not also for the process. Following chapters focus on childcare provided in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  36.  41
    Language Evolution Can Be Shaped by the Structure of the World.Amy Perfors & Daniel J. Navarro - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):775-793.
    Human languages vary in many ways but also show striking cross-linguistic universals. Why do these universals exist? Recent theoretical results demonstrate that Bayesian learners transmitting language to each other through iterated learning will converge on a distribution of languages that depends only on their prior biases about language and the quantity of data transmitted at each point; the structure of the world being communicated about plays no role (Griffiths & Kalish, , ). We revisit these findings and show that when (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  10
    The Meanings of Ethics in and of Advertising.Christopher Hackley - 1999 - Business Ethics: A European Review 8 (1):37-42.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38.  17
    The Meanings of Ethics in and of Advertising.Christopher Hackley - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (1):37–42.
    Advertising presents special difficulties for business ethicists. Ads are trivial entertainments, yet advertising culture has been held up as a metaphor for a general moral degradation in the post‐modern epoch. Ads confuse us since they are a new and unfamiliar form of communicative discourse which we find difficult to place in an ethical category. This, mainly conceptual, paper attempts to explore how ethics in and of advertising may be subject to examination within a broadly social constructionist perspective. The paper sketches (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  8
    Electrophysiological Evidence for Temporal Overlap Among Contingent Mental Processes.Jeff Miller & Steven A. Hackley - 1992 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 121 (2):195-209.
  40.  96
    Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction.Chris Beckett - 2005 - Sage Publications.
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores the complexities of ethical issues, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  41. The Heterogeneity of the Imagination.Amy Kind - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (1):141-159.
    Imagination has been assigned an important explanatory role in a multitude of philosophical contexts. This paper examines four such contexts: mindreading, pretense, our engagement with fiction, and modal epistemology. Close attention to each of these contexts suggests that the mental activity of imagining is considerably more heterogeneous than previously realized. In short, no single mental activity can do all the explanatory work that has been assigned to imagining.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  42.  21
    Moderate Realism and Its Logic.Amie L. Thomasson & D. W. Mertz - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):474.
    D. W. Mertz provides a "new" competitor in the universals debate by reviving, developing, and defending the medieval doctrine of Moderate Realism. This book is a substantial contribution to ontology and logic, combining interesting new arguments for polyadic relations and unit attributes, careful and thorough historical studies, and a logic that could solve many old problems.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  43.  22
    The Curse of Knowledge: First Language Knowledge Impairs Adult Learners’ Use of Novel Statistics for Word Segmentation.Amy S. Finn & Carla L. Hudson Kam - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):477-499.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  44. Desire Satisfactionism and Hedonism.Chris Heathwood - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 128 (3):539-563.
    Hedonism and the desire-satisfaction theory of welfare are typically seen as archrivals in the contest over identifying what makes one's life go best. It is surprising, then, that the most plausible form of hedonism just is the most plausible form of desire satisfactionism. How can a single theory of welfare be a version of both hedonism and desire satisfactionism? The answer lies in what pleasure is: pleasure is, in my view, the subjective satisfaction of desire. This thesis about pleasure is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  45.  13
    Stem Cell Tourism and Doctors' Duties to Minors—A View From Canada.Amy Zarzeczny & Timothy Caulfield - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):3-15.
    While the clinical promise of much stem cell research remains largely theoretical, patients are nonetheless pursuing unproven stem cell therapies in jurisdictions around the world?a phenomenon referred to as ?stem cell tourism.? These treatments are generally advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis via the Internet. Research shows portrayals of stem cell medicine on such websites are overly optimistic and the claims made are unsubstantiated by published evidence. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that parents are pursing these ?treatments? for their children, despite potential (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  46.  78
    Bayesian Models of Cognition: What's Built in After All?Amy Perfors - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (2):127-138.
    This article explores some of the philosophical implications of the Bayesian modeling paradigm. In particular, it focuses on the ramifications of the fact that Bayesian models pre‐specify an inbuilt hypothesis space. To what extent does this pre‐specification correspond to simply ‘‘building the solution in''? I argue that any learner must have a built‐in hypothesis space in precisely the same sense that Bayesian models have one. This has implications for the nature of learning, Fodor's puzzle of concept acquisition, and the role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  47. When Transmission Fails.Chris Tucker - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (4):497-529.
    The Neo-Moorean Deduction (I have a hand, so I am not a brain-in-a-vat) and the Zebra Deduction (the creature is a zebra, so isn’t a cleverly disguised mule) are notorious. Crispin Wright, Martin Davies, Fred Dretske, and Brian McLaughlin, among others, argue that these deductions are instances of transmission failure. That is, they argue that these deductions cannot transmit justification to their conclusions. I contend, however, that the notoriety of these deductions is undeserved. My strategy is to clarify, attack, defend, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  48.  97
    Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature. [REVIEW]Amy M. Schmitter - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):542-546.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  49. Structural Representation and Surrogative Reasoning.Chris Swoyer - 1991 - Synthese 87 (3):449 - 508.
    It is argued that a number of important, and seemingly disparate, types of representation are species of a single relation, here called structural representation, that can be described in detail and studied in a way that is of considerable philosophical interest. A structural representation depends on the existence of a common structure between a representation and that which it represents, and it is important because it allows us to reason directly about the representation in order to draw conclusions about the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  50. What’s so Transparent About Transparency?Amy Kind - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 115 (3):225-244.
    Intuitions about the transparency of experience have recently begun to play a key role in the debate about qualia. Specifically, such intuitions have been used by representationalists to support their view that the phenomenal character of our experience can be wholly explained in terms of its intentional content.[i] But what exactly does it mean to say that experience is transparent? In my view, recent discussions of transparency leave matters considerably murkier than one would like. As I will suggest, there is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000