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Rupert Read [137]Rupert J. Read [12]
  1. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert J. Read (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    This text offers major re-evaluation of Wittgenstein's thinking. It is a collection of essays that presents a significantly different portrait of Wittgenstein. The essays clarify Wittgenstein's modes of philosophical criticism and shed light on the relation between his thought and different philosophical traditions and areas of human concern. With essays by Stanley Cavell, James Conant, Cora Diamond, Peter Winch and Hilary Putnam, we see the emergence of a new way of understanding Wittgenstein's thought. This is a controversial collection, with essays (...)
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  2. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert Read - 2003 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 193 (4):481-482.
     
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  3. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert Read - 2003 - Philosophy 78 (305):425-430.
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  4. Wittgenstein’s Liberatory Philosophy: Thinking Through His Philosophical Investigations.Rupert J. Read - 2020 - New York & London: Routledge.
    In this book, Rupert Read offers the first outline of a resolute reading, following the highly influential New Wittgenstein 'school', of the Philosophical Investigations. He argues that the key to understanding Wittgenstein's later philosophy is to understand its liberatory purport. Read contends that a resolute reading coincides in its fundaments with what, building on ideas in the later Gordon Baker, he calls a liberatory reading. Liberatory philosophy is philosophy that can liberate the user from compulsive patterns of thought, freeing one (...)
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  5.  63
    The New Hume Debate.Rupert J. Read & Kenneth A. Richman (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  6. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary, Rupert Read, Timothy G. Mccarthy, Sean C. Stidd, David Charles & William Child - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):129-137.
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  7. Film as Philosophy: Essays on Cinema After Wittgenstein and Cavell.Rupert Read & Jerry Goodenough (eds.) - 2005 - New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
    A series of essays on film and philosophy whose authors - philosophers or film studies experts - write on a wide variety of films: classic Hollywood comedies, war films, Eastern European art films, science fiction, showing how film and watching it can not only illuminate philosophy but, in an important sense, be doing philosophy. The book is crowned with an interview with Wittgensteinian philosopher Stanley Cavell, discussing his interests in philosophy and in film and how they can come together.
  8. Deep Adaptation: Navigating the Realities of Climate Chaos.Jem Bendell & Rupert Read (eds.) - 2021 - Cambridge, UK & Medford, MA: Polity Press.
    ‘Deep adaptation’ refers to the personal and collective changes that might help us to prepare for – and live with – a climate-influenced breakdown or collapse of our societies. It is a framework for responding to the terrifying realization of increasing disruption by committing ourselves to reducing suffering while saving more of society and the natural world. This is the first book to show how professionals across different sectors are beginning to incorporate the acceptance of likely or unfolding societal breakdown (...)
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  9. The New Hume Debate.Rupert Read & Kenneth A. Richman - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (299):125-129.
  10. Toward a perspicuous presentation of "perspicuous presentation".Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
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  11. Beyond the Tractatus Wars: The New Wittgenstein Debate.Rupert J. Read & Matthew A. Lavery (eds.) - 2011 - New York: Routledge.
    Over fifteen years have passed since Cora Diamond and James Conant turned Wittgenstein scholarship upside down with the program of “resolute” reading, and ten years since this reading was crystallized in the major collection _The New Wittgenstein_. This approach remains at the center of the debate about Wittgenstein and his philosophy, and this book draws together the latest thinking of the world’s leading Tractatarian scholars and promising newcomers. Showcasing one piece alternately from each “camp”, _Beyond the Tractatus Wars_ pairs newly (...)
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  12. A Wittgensteinian Way with Paradoxes.Rupert J. Read - 2012 - Lanham, MD, USA: Lexington Books.
    A Wittgensteinian Way with Paradoxes examines how some of the classic philosophical paradoxes that have so puzzled philosophers over the centuries can be dissolved. Read argues that paradoxes such as the Sorites, Russell’s Paradox and the paradoxes of time travel do not, in fact, need to be solved. Rather, using a resolute Wittgensteinian ‘therapeutic’ method, the book explores how virtually all apparent philosophical paradoxes can be diagnosed and dissolved through examining their conditions of arising; to loosen their grip and therapeutically (...)
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  13. Why Climate Breakdown Matters.Rupert Read - 2022 - London, UK & New York: Bloomsbury.
    Climate change and the destruction of the earth is the most urgent issue of our time. We are hurtling towards the end of civilisation as we know it. With an unflinching honest approach, Rupert Read asks us to face up to the fate of the planet. This is a book for anyone who wants their philosophy to deal with reality and their climate concern to be more than a displacement activity. -/- As people come together to mourn the loss of (...)
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  14. Touching the Earth: Buddhist (and Kierkegaardian) Reflections on and of the ‘Negative’ Emotions.Rupert Read - 2023 - Religions 14 (12):1451.
    This article develops the philosophical work of Joanna Macy. It argues that ecological grief is a fitting response to our ecological predicament and that much of the ‘mental ill health’ that we are now seeing is, in fact, a perfectly sane response to our ecological reality. This paper claims that all ecological emotions are grounded in love/compassion. Acceptance of these emotions reveals that everything is fine in the world as it is, providing that we accept our ecological emotions as part (...)
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  15. On approaching schizophrenia through Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (4):449-475.
    Louis Sass disputes that schizophrenia can be understood successfully according to the hitherto dominant models--for much of what schizophrenics say and do is neither regressive (as psychoanalysis claims) nor just faulty reasoning (as "cognitivists" claim). Sass argues instead that schizophrenics frequently exhibit hyper-rationality, much as philosophers do. He holds that schizophrenic language can after all be interpreted--if we hear it as Wittgenstein hears solipsistic language. I counter first that broadly Winchian considerations undermine both the hermeneutic conception of interpreting other humans (...)
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  16.  12
    Kuhn: Philosopher of Scientific Revolution.Wes Sharrock & Rupert Read - 2002 - Malden, MA: Polity. Edited by Rupert J. Read.
    Thomas Kuhn's shadow hangs over almost every field of intellectual inquiry. His book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions has become a modern classic. His influence on philosophy, social science, historiography, feminism, theology, and (of course) the natural sciences themselves is unparalleled. His epoch-making concepts of ‘new paradigm’ and ‘scientific revolution’ make him probably the most influential scholar of the twentieth century. -/- Sharrock and Read take the reader through Kuhn's work in a careful and accessible way, emphasizing Kuhn's detailed studies (...)
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  17.  15
    Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of “Perspicuous Presentation” 1.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141-160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected inBaker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on “perspicuous presentations,” we offer new criticisms of ‘elucidatory’ readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the ‘perspicuous presentation’ concept, as an achievement‐term, rather than a kind of ‘objective’ mapping of (...)
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  18.  47
    Wittgenstein and the Illusion of ‘Progress’: On Real Politics and Real Philosophy in a World of Technocracy.Rupert Read - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:265-284.
    ‘You can’t stop progress’, we are endlessly told. But what is meant by “progress”? What is “progress” toward? We are rarely told. Human flourishing? And a culture? That would be a good start – but rarely seems a criterion for ‘progress’. Rather, ‘progress’ is simply a process, that we are not allowed, apparently, to stop. Or rather: it would be futile to seek to stop it. So that we are seemingly-deliberately demoralised into giving up even trying.Questioning the myth of ‘progress’, (...)
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  19. Parents for a Future: How Loving our Children can Prevent Climate Collapse.Rupert Read - 2021 - Norwich, UK: UEA Publishing Project.
    That our ecological future appears grave can no longer come as any surprise. And yet we have so far failed, collectively and individually, to begin the kind of action necessary to shift our path away from catastrophic climate collapse. -/- In this stark and startling little book, Rupert Read helps us to understand the direness of our predicament while showing us a metaphor and a method — a way of thinking — by which we might transform it. From the relatively (...)
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  20. Wittgenstein among the sciences: Wittgensteinian investigations into the "scientific method".Rupert J. Read - 2012 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate. Edited by Simon Summers.
    Engaging with the question of the extent to which the so-called human, economic or social sciences are actually sciences, this book moves away from the search for a criterion or definition that will allow us to sharply distinguish the scientific from the non-scientific. Instead, the book favours the pursuit of clarity with regard to the various enterprises undertaken by human beings, with a view to dissolving the felt need for such a demarcation. In other words, Read pursues a ‘therapeutic’ approach (...)
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  21.  61
    Guardians of the future.Rupert Read - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 57 (57):27-28.
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  22.  28
    What Is New in Our Time.Rupert Read - 2019 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 8:81-96.
    Finlayson argues that ‘post-truth’ is nothing new. In this response, I motivate a more modest position: that it is something new, to some extent, albeit neither radically new nor brand new. I motivate this position by examining the case of climate-change-denial, called by some post-truth before 'post-truth'. I examine here the (over-determined) nature of climate-denial. What precisely are its attractions?; How do they manage to outweigh its glaring, potentially-catastrophic downsides? I argue that the most crucial of all attractions of climate-denial (...)
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  23. An elucidatory interpretation of Wittgenstein's tractatus: A critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's reading of tractatus 6.54.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During this debate, (...)
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  24.  72
    A no-theory?: Against Hutto on Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2005 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):73–81.
  25.  56
    “Nothing is Shown”: A ‘Resolute’ Response to Mounce, Emiliani, Koethe and Vilhauer.Rupert Read & Rob Deans - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):239-268.
  26. The New Hume Debate: Revised Edition.Rupert J. Read & Kenneth A. Richman (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    For decades scholars thought they knew Hume's position on the existence of causes and objects he was a sceptic. However, this received view has been thrown into question by the `new readings of Hume as a sceptical realist. For philosophers, students of philosophy and others interested in theories of causation and their history, The New Hume Debate is the first book to fully document the most influential contemporary readings of Hume's work. Throughout, the volume brings the debate beyond textual issues (...)
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  27.  64
    Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism: one practice, no dogma.Rupert Read - 2009 - In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 13--23.
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  28.  81
    Iv *-throwing away 'the bedrock'.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):81-98.
    If one is impressed with Wittgenstein's philosophizing, then it is a deep mistake to think that the terms that he made famous-philosophical terms like 'form of life', 'language-game', 'everyday', 'bedrock'-are the key to his philosophy. On the contrary, they are in the end an obstacle to be overcome. The last temptation of the Wittgensteinian philosopher is to treat these terms as providing a kind of ersatz foundation. They are rather a ladder that takes one... to where one already is, only (...)
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  29.  45
    De‐mystifying tacit knowing and clues: a comment on Henry et al.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):944-947.
  30.  44
    What 'there can be no such thing as meaning anything by any word' could possibly mean.Rupert Read - 2000 - In Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge.
  31. Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein’s Philosophy.A. C. Grayling, Shyam Wuppuluri, Christopher Norris, Nikolay Milkov, Oskari Kuusela, Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Beth Savickey, Jonathan Beale, Duncan Pritchard, Annalisa Coliva, Jakub Mácha, David R. Cerbone, Paul Horwich, Michael Nedo, Gregory Landini, Pascal Zambito, Yoshihiro Maruyama, Chon Tejedor, Susan G. Sterrett, Carlo Penco, Susan Edwards-Mckie, Lars Hertzberg, Edward Witherspoon, Michel ter Hark, Paul F. Snowdon, Rupert Read, Nana Last, Ilse Somavilla & Freeman Dyson (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    “Tell me," Wittgenstein once asked a friend, "why do people always say, it was natural for man to assume that the sun went round the earth rather than that the earth was rotating?" His friend replied, "Well, obviously because it just looks as though the Sun is going round the Earth." Wittgenstein replied, "Well, what would it have looked like if it had looked as though the Earth was rotating?” What would it have looked like if we looked at all (...)
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  32. A Film-Philosophy of Ecology and Enlightenment.Rupert J. Read - 2019 - New York & Oxon, UK: Routledge.
    Inspired by the philosophy of Wittgenstein and his idea that the purpose of real philosophical thinking is not to discover something new, but to show in a strikingly different light what is already there, this book provides philosophical readings of a number of ‘arthouse’ and Hollywood films. Each chapter contains a discussion of two films—one explored in greater detail and the other analyzed as a minor key which reveals the possibility for the book's ideas to be applied across different films, (...)
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  33.  67
    The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy.Rupert Read - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):506-509.
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  34. There is No Such Thing as a Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch.Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2008 - Aldershot, UK & Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    The death of Peter Winch in 1997 sparked a revived interest in his work with this book arguing his work suffered misrepresentation in both recent literature and in contemporary critiques of his writing. Debates in philosophy and sociology about foundational questions of social ontology and methodology often claim to have adequately incorporated and moved beyond Winch's concerns. Re-establishing a Winchian voice, the authors examine how such contentions involve a failure to understand central themes in Winch's writings and that the issues (...)
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  35.  36
    Where Value Resides: Making Ecological Value Possible.Tom Greaves & Rupert Read - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (3):321-340.
    Distinguishing between the source and the locus of value enables environmental philosophers to consider not only what is of value, but also to try to develop a conception of valuation that is itself ecological. Such a conception must address difficulties caused by the original locational metaphors in which the distinction is framed. This is done by reassessing two frequently employed models of valuation, perception and desire, and going on to show that a more adequate ecological understanding of valuation emerges when (...)
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  36. Thomas Kuhn's misunderstood relation to Kripke-Putnam essentialism.Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (1):151-158.
    Kuhn's ‘taxonomic conception’ of natural kinds enables him to defend and re-specify the notion of incommensurability against the idea that it is reference, not meaning/use, that is overwhelmingly important. Kuhn's ghost still lacks any reason to believe that referentialist essentialism undercuts his central arguments in SSR – and indeed, any reason to believe that such essentialism is even coherent, considered as a doctrine about anything remotely resembling our actual science. The actual relation of Kuhn to Kripke-Putnam essentialism, is as follows: (...)
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  37.  9
    Kuhn : le Wittgenstein des sciences ?Rupert Read - 2003 - Archives de Philosophie 3 (3):463-479.
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  38.  17
    ‘Private Language’ and the Second Person: Wittgenstein and Løgstrup ‘Versus’ Levinas?Rupert Read - 2019 - In Joel Backström, Hannes Nykänen, Niklas Toivakainen & Thomas Wallgren (eds.), Moral Foundations of Philosophy of Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 363-390.
    The existence of other people addresses us; their existence is a fundamentally second-person matter. This chapter argues that staying too much in the would-be-utterly spectatorial third person, or stuck within the first person, has been philosophy’s bane. Such ‘objectivity’ and ‘subjectivity’, far from being opposites, are but two sides of the same coin. The alternative is the living world of the second person: being involved with others. I connect my illustration and elicitation of this ethics to Løgstrup and to Levinas. (...)
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  39.  49
    Literature as Philosophy of Psychopathology: William Faulkner as Wittgenstein.Rupert J. Read - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):115-124.
    I argue that the language of some schizophrenic persons is akin to the language of Benjy in Williams Faulkner's novel The Sound and the Fury, in one crucial respect: Faulkner displays to us language that, ironically, cannot be translated or interpreted into sense... without irreducible 'loss' or 'garbling.' The same is true of famous schizophrenic writers, such as Renee and Schreber. Such 'garbling' is of an odd kind, admittedly: it is a garbling that inadvisably turns nonsense into sense.... Faulkner's language (...)
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  40.  45
    The real philosophical discovery': A reply to Jolley 's 'Philosophical Investigations 133: Wittgenstein and the End of Philosophy?Rupert Read - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (4):362-369.
  41.  59
    The `Hard' Problem of Consciousness Is Continually Reproduced and Made Harder by All Attempts to Solve It.Rupert Read - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (2):51-86.
  42.  11
    A Wittgensteinian/Austinian Qualified Defense of Ryle on Know-How.Rupert Read - 2018 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 39 (2):405-429.
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  43.  6
    Guardians of the future.Rupert Read - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 57:27-28.
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  44.  48
    Throwing away 'the bedrock'.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):81–98.
    If one is impressed with Wittgenstein's philosophizing, then it is a deep mistake to think that the terms that he made famous-philosophical terms like 'form of life', 'language-game', 'everyday', 'bedrock'-are the key to his philosophy. On the contrary, they are in the end an obstacle to be overcome. The last temptation of the Wittgensteinian philosopher is to treat these terms as providing a kind of ersatz foundation. They are rather a ladder that takes one... to where one already is, only (...)
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  45.  11
    Throwing Away 'the Bedrock'.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105:81-98.
    If one is impressed with Wittgenstein's philosophizing, then it is a deep mistake to think that the terms that he made famous-philosophical terms like 'form of life', 'language-game', 'everyday', 'bedrock'-are the key to his philosophy. On the contrary, they are in the end an obstacle to be overcome. The last temptation of the Wittgensteinian philosopher is to treat these terms as providing a kind of ersatz foundation. They are rather a ladder that takes one... to where one already is, only (...)
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  46.  5
    Acting from rules: “Internal relations” versus “logical existentialism”.James Guetti & Rupert Read - 1996 - International Studies in Philosophy 28 (2):43-62.
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  47.  42
    Against 'time–slices'.Rupert Read - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (1):24–43.
    The concept of ‘time–slice’ turns out to be at best philosophically inconsequential, I argue. Influential philosophies of time as apparently diverse as those of Dummett, Lewis and Bergson, thus must come to grief. The very idea of ‘time–slice’ upon which they rest – the very idea of spatialising time, and of rendering the resulting ‘slices’ of potentially infinitely small measure – turns out on closer acquaintance not to amount to anything consequential that has yet been made sense of. Time is, (...)
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  48. Marx and Wittgenstein on vampires and parasites: A critique of capital and metaphysics.Rupert Read - 2002 - In Gavin Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. pp. 35--254.
  49.  81
    Meaningful consequences.Rupert Read & James Guetti - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (4):289-314.
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  50.  58
    Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2001 - The Philosophers' Magazine 15:53-53.
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