112 found
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  1.  28
    Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid.Russell Hardin - 1979 - Ethics 90 (2):310-311.
  2.  24
    Collective Action.Russell Hardin - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):336-339.
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  3.  38
    Morality Within the Limits of Reason.Russell Hardin - 1988 - University of Chicago Press.
    Hardin demonstrates that many of these structural issues can and should be distinguished from the thornier problems of utilitarian value theory, and he is able ...
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  4.  34
    David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist.Russell Hardin - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Hume's place in history -- Moral psychology -- Strategic analysis -- Convention -- Political theory -- Justice as order -- Utilitarianism -- Value theory -- Retrospective.
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  5.  93
    Trustworthiness.Russell Hardin - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):26-42.
  6.  13
    One for All: The Logic of Group Conflict.Russell Hardin - 1995 - Princeton University Press.
    In a book that challenges the most widely held ideas of why individuals engage in collective conflict, Russell Hardin offers a timely, crucial explanation of group action in its most destructive forms. Contrary to those observers who attribute group violence to irrationality, primordial instinct, or complex psychology, Hardin uncovers a systematic exploitation of self-interest in the underpinnings of group identification and collective violence. Using examples from Mafia vendettas to ethnic violence in places such as Bosnia and Rwanda, he describes the (...)
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  7.  61
    The Street-Level Epistemology of Trust.Russell Hardin - 1992 - Analyse & Kritik 14 (2):152-176.
    Rational choice and other accounts of trust base it in objective assessments of the risks and benefits of trusting. But rational subjects must choose in the light of what knowledge they have, and that knowledge determines their capacities for trust. This is an epistemological issue, but not at the usual level of the philosophy of knowledge. Rather, it is an issue of pragmatic rationality for a given actor. It is commonly argued that trust is inherently embedded in iterated, thick relationships. (...)
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  8.  75
    Street-Level Epistemology and Democratic Participation.Russell Hardin - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (2):212–229.
  9.  10
    Liberalism, Constitutionalism, and Democracy.Russell Hardin - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (220):534-536.
    The central argument of this book is that liberalism, constitutionalism, and democracy, as well as, specifically, liberal constitutional democracy all work, when they do, because they serve the mutual advantage of the politically effective groups in the society through coordination of those groups on a political and, perhaps, economic order. These arguments are applied both to the early history of constitutional developments in the United States and to contemporary transitions from autocratic regimes to market democracies. A subsidiary claim is that (...)
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  10.  11
    How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge.Russell Hardin - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    Hardin presents an essentially economic account of what an individual can come to know and then applies this account to many areas of ordinary life: political participation, religious beliefs, popular knowledge of science, liberalism, ...
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  11.  66
    Hobbesian Political Order.Russell Hardin - 1991 - Political Theory 19 (2):156-180.
  12.  44
    Ignorant Democracy.Russell Hardin - 2006 - Critical Review 18 (1-3):179-195.
    The paradox of mass voting is not, generally speaking, matched by a paradoxical mass attempt to be politically well informed. As Converse underscored, most people are grossly politically ignorant—just as they would be if, as rational‐ignorance theory holds, they realized that their votes don't matter. Yet many millions of them contradict the theory by voting. This contradiction, and the illogical reasons people offer for voting, suggest that the logic of collective action does not come naturally to people. To equate public (...)
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  13. Infinite Regress and Arrow's Theorem.Russell Hardin - 1980 - Ethics 90 (3):383-390.
  14.  94
    The Free Rider Problem.Russell Hardin - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  15. Deliberation: Method, Not Theory.Russell Hardin - 1999 - In Stephen Macedo (ed.), Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement. Oxford University Press. pp. 103--19.
     
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  16. Comment on Formal Decision Theory and Majority Rule.Russell Hardin - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):207-210.
  17. Indeterminacy and Society.Russell Hardin - 2013 - Princeton University Press.
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  18. Civil Liberties in the Era of Mass Terrorism.Russell Hardin - 2004 - The Journal of Ethics 8 (1):77-95.
    This paper discusses the impact of the so-called war on terrorism on civil liberties. The United States government in Madison’s plan was to be distrusted and hemmed in to protect citizens against it. The terrorist attacks of 2001 have seemingly licensed the US government to violate its Madisonian principles. While the current government asks for citizen trust, its actions justify distrust. The courts, which normally are the chief defenders of civil liberties, typically acquiesce in administration policies during emergencies, and it (...)
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  19. Trustworthiness* Russell Hardin.Russell Hardin - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):26-42.
     
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  20.  4
    Indeterminacy and Society.Russell Hardin - 2005 - Princeton University Press.
    In simple action theory, when people choose between courses of action, they know what the outcome will be. When an individual is making a choice "against nature," such as switching on a light, that assumption may hold true. But in strategic interaction outcomes, indeterminacy is pervasive and often intractable. Whether one is choosing for oneself or making a choice about a policy matter, it is usually possible only to make a guess about the outcome, one based on anticipating what other (...)
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  21.  63
    The Morality of Law and Economics.Russell Hardin - 1992 - Law and Philosophy 11 (4):331 - 384.
    The moral heart of normative law and economics is efficiency, especially dynamic efficiency that takes incentive effects into account. In the economic theory, justificatory argument is inherently at the institutional- or rule-level, not an the individual- or case-level. InMarkets, Morals, and the Law Jules Coleman argues against the efficiency theory on normative grounds. Although he strongly asserts the need to view law institutionally, he frequently grounds his criticisms of law and economics in arguments from little more than direct moral intuition (...)
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  22.  65
    From Bodo Ethics to Distributive Justice.Russell Hardin - 1999 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):399-413.
    Concern with material equality as the central form of distributive justice is a very modern idea. Distributive justice for Aristotle and many other writers for millennia after him was a matter of distributing what each ought to get from merit or desert in some sense. Many, such as Hume, thought material equality a pernicious idea. In the medieval village life of Bodo, villagers knew enough about each other to govern relations through norms, including, when necessary, a norm of charity. In (...)
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  23.  28
    The Utilitarian Logic of Liberalism.Russell Hardin - 1986 - Ethics 97 (1):47-74.
  24.  34
    From Power to Order, From Hobbes to Hume.Russell Hardin - 1993 - Journal of Political Philosophy 1 (1):69-81.
  25.  46
    From Order to Justice.Russell Hardin - 2005 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (2):175-194.
    We can observe in the progression of the work of Thomas Hobbes through David Hume to John Rawls a development from a focus on severe disorder to order under law and then to concern with distribution. This striking development is not due simply to changes of normative views, but is in large part about the technical or virtually technological capacities of government. There are also non-normative theoretical and significant developments in their theories. Hence, much of the difference between these philosophers, (...)
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  26. Rationally Justifying Political Coercion.Russell Hardin - 1990 - Journal of Philosophical Research 15:79-91.
    The central problem of political philosophy is how to justify coercion by government. For political theories that are based in a rational accounting of the interests of the polity, citizens must have consented at least indirectly to coercion. Such indirect consent to coercion is plausible for ordinary contexts such as, for example, submitting to legally enforceable contracts. Unfortunately, however, Hobbesian mutual advantage, contemporary contractarian, and Lockean natural rights theories, all of which ground the state in rational interests at least in (...)
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  27.  53
    Trust: A Sociological Theory, Piotr Sztompka.Russell Hardin - 2002 - Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):183-204.
  28. Introduction.Russell Hardin & John J. Mearsheimer - 1985 - Ethics 95 (3):411-423.
  29.  38
    Representing Ignorance.Russell Hardin - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):76-99.
    If we wish to assess the morality of elected officials, we must understand their function as our representatives and then infer how they can fulfill this function. I propose to treat the class of elected officials as a profession, so that their morality is a role morality and it is functionally determined. If we conceive the role morality of legislators to be analogous to the ethics of other professions, then this morality must be functionally defined by the purpose that legislators (...)
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  30.  12
    Rationality, Irrationality and Functionalist Explanation.Russell Hardin - 1980 - Social Science Information 19 (4-5):755-772.
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  31.  27
    Bargaining for Justice.Russell Hardin - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):65.
    David Gauthier's Morals by Agreement presents a partial theory of distributive justice. It is partial because it applies only to the distribution of gains from joint endeavors, or what we may call the ‘social surplus’ from cooperation. This surplus is the benefit we receive from cooperation insofar as this is greater than what we might have produced through individual efforts without interaction with others. The central core of Gauthier's theory of distributive justice is his bargaining theory of ‘minimax relative concession’ (...)
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  32. A Symposium on Trust.Karen Jones, Russell Hardin & Lawrence C. Becker - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):4-61.
     
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  33.  27
    Book Review:Philosophy and Ideology in Hume's Political Thought. David Miller; David Hume: Common-Sense Moralist, Sceptical Metaphysician. David Hume, David Fate Norton.Russell Hardin - 1984 - Ethics 94 (3):534-536.
  34.  39
    Democratic Epistemology and Accountability.Russell Hardin - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):110.
    Most of the knowledge of an ordinary person has a very messy structure and cannot meet standard epistemological criteria for its justification. Rather, a street-level epistemology makes sense of ordinary knowledge. Street-level epistemology is a subjective account of knowledge, not a public account. It is not about what counts as knowledge in, say, physics, but deals rather, with your knowledge, my knowledge, the ordinary person's knowledge. I wish not to elaborate this view here, but to apply it to the problems (...)
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  35.  19
    The Normative Core of Rational Choice Theory.Russell Hardin - 2001 - In Uskali Mäki (ed.), The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 62--57.
  36.  50
    Norms and Games.Russell Hardin - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):843-849.
    There are three centrally important ways in which norms have been elaborated and explained: in terms of religious or natural law strictures on behavior, in terms of constraints imposed by rationality, and, recently, in terms of agents' behavior in well‐defined games. The principal difficulty of a gaming account of norms is to show how the account explains motivations of individuals to follow the norms. This issue is examined in the context of small‐number norms and large‐number norms. †To contact the author, (...)
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  37.  92
    Law and Social Order.Russell Hardin - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):61 - 85.
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  38.  57
    Trust: A Sociological Theory, Piotr Sztompka. Cambridge University Press, 1999, Xii + 214pages. [REVIEW]Russell Hardin - 2002 - Economics and Philosophy 18 (1):183-204.
  39.  22
    Societies and Social Decision Functions. Antonio Camacho.Russell Hardin - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):335-336.
  40.  13
    Deliberative Democracy.Russell Hardin - 2009 - In Thomas Christiano & John Philip Christman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Political Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 17--231.
  41.  26
    Unilateral Versus Mutual Disarmament.Russell Hardin - 1983 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (3):236-254.
  42. Carnegie Council.J. Bryan Hehir, Pierre Laberge, Michael N. Barnett, Brad R. Roth, Fernando R. Tesón, Steven P. Lee, Russell Hardin, Thomas Donaldson, Frances V. Harbour & Thomas W. Smith - 1995 - Ethics and International Affairs 9.
     
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  43.  64
    Ethics in Big Science.Russell Hardin - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:231-245.
    In accounts of the ethics of science, we may treat practicing science as an institution of sorts. It has an imputed purpose, roughly, finding the truth about vast classes of causal relations. Scientists have been able to act reasonably with no more than the natural confluence of individual interest with the truth. But in the age of institutionalized science, with career stakes outside the accumulation of scientific findings and with institutional interests often directly conflicting with truth, this ‘natural confluence’ is (...)
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  44.  25
    Efficiency Vs. Equality and the Demise of Socialism.Russell Hardin - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):149 - 161.
    One of my fellow graduate students at MIT had access to the Pentagon Papers at a time when they were still classified, and he was writing a dissertation on aspects of the American involvement in Vietnam. One morning over breakfast he discovered that he had been preempted by the New York Times. Every scholar recently working on the Soviet Union, China, and Eastern Europe must understand that student’s sensation that morning. By now, they must face newspapers with a mixture of (...)
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  45.  27
    Macneil, Ian R., "The New Social Contract: An Inquiry Into Modern Contractual Relations". [REVIEW]Russell Hardin - 1982 - Ethics 93:168.
  46. Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions.John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
     
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  47.  2
    Index.Russell Hardin - 2009 - In How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge. Princeton University Press. pp. 219-224.
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  48.  25
    Liberalism: Political and Economic*: Russell Hardin.Russell Hardin - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):121-144.
    Political liberalism began in the eighteenth century with the effort to establish a secular state in which religious differences would be tolerated. If religious views include universal principles to apply to all by force if necessary, diverse religions must conflict, perhaps fatally. In a sense, then, political liberalism was an invention to resolve a then current, awful problem. Its proponents were articulate and finally persuasive. There have been many comparable social inventions, many of which have failed, as Communism, egalitarianism, and (...)
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  49.  53
    Sanction and Obligation.Russell Hardin - 1985 - The Monist 68 (3):403-418.
    H. L. A. Hart’s criticism of Austin’s theory of law is that it is essentially false to the facts. Austin asserts that “Every positive law simply and strictly so called, is set by a sovereign person, or sovereign body of persons, to a … person or persons in a state of subjection to its author.” Laws get their force from the threat of sanction. This view, which we may call “the gunman theory of law,” is what Hart criticizes. Too many (...)
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  50.  9
    The Emergence of Norms.Russell Hardin - 1980 - Ethics 90 (4):575-587.
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