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  1.  5
    #RepealedThe8th: Translating Travesty, Global Conversation, and the Irish Abortion Referendum.Ruth Fletcher - 2018 - Feminist Legal Studies 26 (3):233-259.
    Why does #RepealedThe8th matter for feminist legal studies? The answers seem obvious in one sense. Feminism has long constituted itself through the struggle for sexual and reproductive justice, and Irish feminism has contributed a significant ‘legal win’ with the landslide vote of approval for lifting abortion restrictions in the referendum on the 25th May 2018. That win comes at a global moment when populist legal engagement is doing significant damage in countries that regard themselves as world leaders, and beyond. #RepealedThe8th (...)
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  2.  13
    Wench Tactics? Openings in Conditions of Closure.Ruth Fletcher, Diamond Ashiagbor, Nicola Barker, Katie Cruz, Nadine El-Enany, Nikki Godden-Rasul, Emily Grabham, Sarah Keenan, Ambreena Manji, Julie McCandless, Sheelagh McGuinness, Sara Ramshaw, Yvette Russell, Harriet Samuels, Ann Stewart & Dania Thomas - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (1):1-23.
    Picking up the question of what FLaK might be, this editorial considers the relationship between openness and closure in feminist legal studies. How do we draw on feminist struggles for openness in common resources, from security to knowledge, as we inhabit a compromised space in commercial publishing? We think about this first in relation to the content of this issue: on image-based abuse continuums, asylum struggles, trials of protestors, customary justice, and not-so-timely reparations. Our thoughts take us through the different (...)
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  3.  10
    FLaK: Mixing Feminism, Legality and Knowledge.Ruth Fletcher - 2015 - Feminist Legal Studies 23 (3):241-252.
    This editorial explains the themes of the forthcoming FLaK seminar and how those themes draw on the collective and individual contributions of the articles, interviews and commentaries presented in this issue. At FLaK, we propose to think with others about the kind of ‘kitchen table’ that FLS might provide into the future. How might feminist legal studies—the approach and the journal—best use its food, equipment, techniques, time, space, mood, energy and commitment? How shall FLS scholars and associates make the most (...)
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  4.  10
    Internationalism and Commitment at the Kitchen Table.Ruth Fletcher, Julie McCandless, Yvette Russell & Dania Thomas - 2016 - Feminist Legal Studies 24 (1):1-6.
    The contributors to this issue focus on legal internationalism, including hybrid mixes with nationalist forms. They have provoked us as editors to think more about these sites and forms of engagement. Sankey shows how civic participation in the ECCC has played a key role in surfacing the gendered harms of separation and starvation. Turan highlights the problems with ICC exclusion of the experience of men and boys from sexual violence. Peroni expresses her hesitations over the Istanbul Convention given an association (...)
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  5.  2
    On Being Uncomfortable.Ruth Fletcher, Julie McCandless, Yvette Russell & Dania Thomas - 2016 - Feminist Legal Studies 24 (2):121-126.
    Since the last issue of Feminist Legal Studies, we editorial board members have had lots of conversations about comfort, displacement and alienation. As we developed the programme for #FLaK2016 we thought about it as a kind of pulling ourselves out of our comfort zone, if academic events and journals ever have a comfort zone. Drawing on a mix of feminist live performance methods and a science and technology studies-type curiosity for objects of experimentation, we tried out a kitchen table method (...)
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  6.  6
    Back at the Kitchen Table: Reflections on Decolonising and Internationalising with the Global South Socio-Legal Writing Workshops.Zainab Batul Naqvi, Ruth Fletcher, Diamond Ashiagbor, Katie Cruz & Yvette Russell - 2019 - Feminist Legal Studies 27 (2):123-137.
    It has been three years since we held the Feminism, Legality and Knowledge seminar to respond to our developing frustrations and excitement around feminist legal studies and academic publishing. In the wake of our 25th anniversary in 2018, we critically reflect further on our original intention to stock up on decolonising techniques to mix feminism, legality and knowledge whilst building on previous consideration of our self-proclaimed ‘international’ status. These reflections are prompted by editorial board members’ experiences as participants in the (...)
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  7.  7
    Responding to Submissions and Introducing Issue 23.Ruth Fletcher - 2015 - Feminist Legal Studies 23 (1):1-6.
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  8.  17
    Embodied Practices.Ruth Fletcher - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):315-318.
  9.  14
    Law, Gender and Sexuality: The Making of a Field: Introduction. [REVIEW]Rosemary Hunter & Ruth Fletcher - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):289-292.
    The papers in the following section arose from a roundtable discussion organised by the AHRC Research Centre for Law, Gender and Sexuality, titled ‘Law, Gender and Sexuality: The Making of a Field’. Participants in the roundtable were asked to reflect on the challenges confronting law, gender and sexuality (LGS) as an area of research and scholarship, and to ask what benefits, possibilities, risks and dangers accompany the establishment of a research terrain. The papers address such questions as ‘what is a (...)
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  10.  26
    Abortion Needs or Abortion Rights? Claiming State Accountability for Women’s Reproductive Welfare: Family Planning Association of Northern Ireland V. Minister for Health, Social Services and Public Safety.Ruth Fletcher - 2005 - Feminist Legal Studies 13 (1):123-134.
    The Family Planning Association Northern Ireland has recently been successful in holding the state accountable for its duty to safeguard women’s reproductive health and welfare, and clarify the circumstances in which abortion is lawful. By demanding that the Minister for Health investigate abortion provision and produce abortion guidance, F.P.A.N.I. hope to improve the quality of abortion services and alleviate the situation of those women who are legally entitled to abortion in Northern Ireland but cannot access it there. This action has (...)
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  11. Cheeky Witnessing.Ruth Fletcher - 2020 - Feminist Review 124 (1):124-141.
    Feminists witness legal worlds as they observe, document and share nothing less than the reproduction of life itself. The world of the abortion trail, where people and things move across borders to change life’s reproduction, has generated a rich variety of legal sources, figures and objects for feminist witnessing. In watching how feminist activists improvise with sources, figures and objects of legal consciousness on the abortion trail, this article seeks to contribute to critical understanding of a plurality of witnessing practice, (...)
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  12.  8
    Reproduction and Scale: A Response to Skeggs and Wilson. [REVIEW]Ruth Fletcher - 2010 - Feminist Legal Studies 18 (1):77-84.
    This paper draws on the concepts of reproduction and scale to suggest that Skeggs and Wilson, in their contributions to this issue of Feminist Legal Studies, both identify a future-oriented reworking of historically accumulated value. The spectacular emotional labour of British reality television and the parody of mechanistic labour in Bangkok’s sex shows may be seen as instances in the affective search for future security in transnational markets. Capitalist subjectivities are still being produced through these gendered and sexual activities, but (...)
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  13. Reproductive Consumption.Ruth Fletcher - 2006 - Feminist Theory 7 (1):27-47.
    Significant developments in medical research and technology have meant that the process of reproduction is increasingly affected by the consumption of a variety of services and goods. Individuals intervene in their own reproductive processes as they eat particular foods, take particular drugs and avail themselves of diagnostic and reproductive services. Although such developments have been analysed by feminists in terms of their ethical consequences or their contribution to the commodification of reproduction, they have not been evaluated in terms of their (...)
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  14. Silences: Irish Women and Abortion.Ruth Fletcher - 1995 - Feminist Review 50 (1):44-66.
    This article considers the forces which act to prevent women in Ireland from speaking about their experiences of abortion. It considers the various forms such silencing can take and the complexity of feelings and circumstance which women who have had abortions are subject to. In so doing it raises important questions about the way public debate about abortion between pro-choice and pro-life arguments — couched in terms of rights — acts to further silence women. Finally, the article calls for the (...)
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  15.  7
    Touchstones: Editorial Introduction 23.Ruth Fletcher - 2015 - Feminist Legal Studies 23 (2):121-126.
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  16.  1
    Law’s Vulnerability, and Vulnerability in Law.Dania Thomas, Yvette Russell, Julie McCandless & Ruth Fletcher - 2016 - Feminist Legal Studies 24 (3):243-247.
    Vulnerability acts as a touchstone in this issue as we find our contributors reflecting on its intersection with gender and sexuality in different ways. Saeidzadeh draws out the significance of misrecognition in her consideration of responses to transsexuality in Iran, while Doonan highlights the potential pitfalls of relying on situational vulnerability in her critique of anti-trafficking legal discourse in the US. Lindsey considers the legal potential of situational vulnerability as a tool to address the ‘persistent failure to take action against (...)
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