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  1.  7
    Postanarchism.Ruth Kinna - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (2):278-281.
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  2.  69
    The Relevance of Morris's Utopia.Ruth Kinna - 2004 - The European Legacy 9 (6):739-750.
    This paper considers the reputation of William Morris's News From Nowhere and its evaluation as a utopia. It argues that there is a discrepancy between scholarly estimations of the book's importance and its treatment as a utopia relevant to socialism. Whilst scholars have for many years almost unanimously praised News From Nowhere as Morris's crowning achievement, most have also attempted to argue that Morris did not intend his work to be used as a serious model for socialism. After reviewing some (...)
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  3. William Morris and Anti-Parliamentarism.Ruth Kinna - 1994 - History of Political Thought 15 (4):593-613.
    This paper presents a different interpretation for Morris's change of mind on the issue of participation in 1890, and offers a new interpretation of his utopian writings in the light of this examination. In the first part it examines Morris's relationship to anarchism and Marxism and his reasons for adopting an anti-parliamentary stance in the period 1884 to 1890. It accepts the Marxist interpretation that Morris was never an anarchist but against it argues that he was serious in his hostility (...)
     
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  4.  23
    Anarchism and Authority: A Philosophical Introduction to Classical Anarchism.Ruth Kinna - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):242-244.
  5.  18
    Fields of Vision: Kropotkin and Revolutionary Change.Ruth Kinna - 2007 - Substance 36 (2):67-86.
  6.  16
    The Jacobinism and Patriotism of Ernest Belfort Bax.Ruth Kinna - 2004 - History of European Ideas 30 (4):463-484.
    This article examines Ernest Belfort Bax's interpretation of the French Revolution and traces the impact that his idea of the Revolution had on his philosophy and his political thought. The first section considers Bax's understanding of the Revolution in the context of his theory of history and analyses his conception of the Revolution's legacy, drawing particularly on his portraits of Robespierre, Marat and Babeuf. The second section shows how the lessons Bax drew from this history shaped his socialist republicanism and (...)
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  7.  16
    William Morris: Art, Work, and Leisure.Ruth Kinna - 2000 - Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (3):493-512.
  8.  7
    William Morris and the Problem of Englishness.Ruth Kinna - 2006 - European Journal of Political Theory 5 (1):85-99.
    This article examines William Morris’s idea of Englishness, considered through a critique of his concept of fellowship or community. It looks at the charge that Morris wrongly neglected the importance of nationality as a focus for organization in socialism, preferring instead an internationalist ideal, based on an unworkable model of small-scale community. I defend Morris against these claims by arguing that Morris’s socialism was consistent with expressions of nationality and that his communitarianism was grounded on a concept of enjoyable labour, (...)
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  9.  6
    Rebel Alliances: The Means and Ends of Contemporary British Anarchisms.Ruth Kinna - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (3):341.
  10.  2
    Rebel Alliances: The Means and Ends of Contemporary British Anarchisms.Ruth Kinna - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (3):341-343.
  11. The Mirror of Anarchy : The Egoism of John Henry Mackay and Dora Marsden.Ruth Kinna - 2011 - In Saul Newman (ed.), Max Stirner. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 42-67.
     
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  12. William Morris: The Art of Socialism.Ruth Kinna - 2000 - University of Wales Press.
    For many years, William Morris’s utopian novel, _News From Nowhere_, has been considered a socialist classic. In it, he describes a future society in which poverty and hardship have been overcome and where individuals are free to express their creativity. For many readers it has been an inspirational text but, at the same time, scholars have openly admitted that the society it describes is impractical. Indeed, in recent years, writers and politicians sympathetic to Morris’s socialism have tended to defend the (...)
     
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