12 found
Order:
  1.  36
    Will CRISPR Germline Engineering Close the Door to an Open Future?Rachel L. Mintz, John D. Loike & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1409-1423.
    The bioethical principle of autonomy is problematic regarding the future of the embryo who lacks the ability to self-advocate but will develop this defining human capacity in time. Recent experiments explore the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /Cas9 for germline engineering in the embryo, which alters future generations. The embryo’s inability to express an autonomous decision is an obvious bioethical challenge of germline engineering. The philosopher Joel Feinberg acknowledged that autonomy is developing in children. He advocated that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  18
    Bioethical Considerations in Translational Research: Primate Stroke.Michael E. Sughrue, J. Mocco, Willam J. Mack, Andrew F. Ducruet, Ricardo J. Komotar, Ruth L. Fischbach, Thomas E. Martin & E. Sander Connolly - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):3-12.
    Controversy and activism have long been linked to the subject of primate research. Even in the midst of raging ethical debates surrounding fertility treatments, genetically modified foods and stem-cell research, there has been no reduction in the campaigns of activists worldwide. Plying their trade of intimidation aimed at ending biomedical experimentation in all animals, they have succeeded in creating an environment where research institutions, often painted as guilty until proven innocent, have avoided addressing the issue for fear of becoming targets. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  3.  26
    First Page Preview.Fritz Allhoff, Françoise Baylis, Richard Glen Boire, Christopher Buford, Tom Buller, Raymond DeVries, Hubert Doucet, Kathinka Evers, Joseph Fins & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):29-31.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  4.  48
    “Doctor, Will You Turn Off My LVAD?”.Jeremy R. Simon & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (1):14-15.
  5.  36
    Neuroethicists Needed Now More Than Ever.Ruth L. Fischbach & Gerald D. Fischbach - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):47 – 48.
  6.  24
    Maternal–Fetal Cell Transfer in Surrogacy: Ties That Bind.Ruth L. Fischbach & John D. Loike - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (5):35-36.
  7.  62
    Minority Populations and Advance Directives: Insights From a Focus Group Methodology.Joshua M. Hauser, Sharon F. Kleefield, Troyen A. Brennan & Ruth L. Fischbach - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):58-71.
    Numerous studies have shown almost uniformly positive opinions among patients and physicians regarding the concept of advance directives . Several of these studies have also shown that the actual use of advance directives is significantly lower than this enthusiasm would suggest, but they have not explained the apparent discordance. Nor have researchers explained why members of minority groups are much less likely to complete advance directives than are white patients. In this study, we used a focus group methodology to examine (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  14
    The Brain Doesn't Lie.Ruth L. Fischbach & Gerald D. Fischbach - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):54-55.
  9.  25
    Minority Populations and Advance Directives: Insights From a Focus Group Methodology.Joshua M. Hauser, Sharon F. Kleefield, Troyen A. Brennan & Ruth L. Fischbach - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):58-71.
    Numerous studies have shown almost uniformly positive opinions among patients and physicians regarding the concept of advance directives. Several of these studies have also shown that the actual use of advance directives is significantly lower than this enthusiasm would suggest, but they have not explained the apparent discordance. Nor have researchers explained why members of minority groups are much less likely to complete advance directives than are white patients. In this study, we used a focus group methodology to examine the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  14
    Harmonizing Regulations for Biomedical Research: A Critical Analysis of the Us and Venezuelan Systems.Dannie di Tillio-Gonzalez & Ruth L. Fischbach - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):167-177.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  37
    The Ombudsman for Research Practice A Proposal for a New Position and an Invitation to Comment.Ruth L. Fischbach & Diane C. Gilbert - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (4):389-402.
    We propose that institutions consider establishing a position of “Ombudsman for Research Practice”. This person would assume several roles: as asounding board to those needing confidential consultation about research issues — basic, applied or clinical; as afacilitator for those wishing to pursue a formal grievance process; and as aneducator to distribute guidelines and standards, to raise the consciousness regarding sloppy or irregular practices in order to prevent misconduct and to promote the responsible conduct of research. While there are compelling features (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12.  21
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Bioethical Considerations in Translational Research: Primate Stroke”.Michael E. Sughrue, J. Mocco, Willam J. Mack, Andrew F. Ducruet, Ricardo J. Komotar, Ruth L. Fischbach, Thomas E. Martin & E. Sander Connolly - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):1-3.
    Controversy and activism have long been linked to the subject of primate research. Even in the midst of raging ethical debates surrounding fertility treatments, genetically modified foods and stem-cell research, there has been no reduction in the campaigns of activists worldwide. Plying their trade of intimidation aimed at ending biomedical experimentation in all animals, they have succeeded in creating an environment where research institutions, often painted as guilty until proven innocent, have avoided addressing the issue for fear of becoming targets. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark