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  1.  25
    Attitudes of Paediatric and Obstetric Specialists Towards Prenatal Surgery for Lethal and Non-Lethal Conditions.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, John D. Lantos, Christopher A. Collura, Alan W. Flake, Mark P. Johnson, Natalie E. Rintoul, Stephen D. Brown & Chris Feudtner - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104377.
    Background While prenatal surgery historically was performed exclusively for lethal conditions, today intrauterine surgery is also performed to decrease postnatal disabilities for non-lethal conditions. We sought to describe physicians' attitudes about prenatal surgery for lethal and non-lethal conditions and to elucidate characteristics associated with these attitudes. Methods Survey of 1200 paediatric surgeons, neonatologists and maternal–fetal medicine specialists. Results Of 1176 eligible physicians, 670 responded. In the setting of a lethal condition for which prenatal surgery would likely result in the child (...)
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  2.  24
    The Moral Psychology of Rationing Among Physicians: The Role of Harm and Fairness Intuitions in Physician Objections to Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Containment.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Katherine M. James & Jon C. Tilburt - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:13.
    Physicians vary in their moral judgments about health care costs. Social intuitionism posits that moral judgments arise from gut instincts, called “moral foundations.” The objective of this study was to determine if “harm” and “fairness” intuitions can explain physicians’ judgments about cost-containment in U.S. health care and using cost-effectiveness data in practice, as well as the relative importance of those intuitions compared to “purity”, “authority” and “ingroup” in cost-related judgments.
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  3.  13
    Spanning Our Differences: Moral Psychology, Physician Beliefs, and the Practice of Medicine.Ryan M. Antiel, Katherine M. Humeniuk & Jon C. Tilburt - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:17.
    Moral pluralism is the norm in contemporary society. Even the best philosophical arguments rarely persuade moral opponents who differ at a foundational level. This has been vividly illustrated in contemporary debates in bioethics surrounding contentious issues such as abortion and euthanasia. It is readily apparent that bioethics discourse lacks an empirical explanation for the broad differences about various topics in bioethics and health policy. In recent years, social and cognitive psychology has generated novel approaches for defining basic differences in moral (...)
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  4.  4
    To Leave or to Lie: Duty Hour Restrictions and Patient Ownership.Ryan M. Antiel & Thane A. Blinman - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (9):13-15.
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