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  1.  13
    The Idea of Chivalry in the Scottish Enlightenment: The Case of David Hume.Ryu Susato - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):155-178.
    It is generally assumed that in early modern Britain, chivalry—allegedly typified by the Crusades—was considered a negative or even ridiculous ideology until its rehabilitation by the pre-Romantic movement. However, this paper argues that Hume and other Scottish Enlightenment thinkers had already shown a deep interest in its historical role and influence on modern civilization. That Hume shared a broad interest in chivalry with contemporary philosophers does not undermine the novelty of his thought on this topic. In fact, the pioneering and (...)
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  2.  50
    Hume’s Nuanced Defense of Luxury.Ryu Susato - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):167-186.
    The significance of Hume’s positive attitude towards luxury might have been overemphasized by his commentators. In fact, arguments in favor of “moderate” luxury had already been entertained before the emergence of Hume’s position. Therefore to argue that Hume’s argument entailed the defense of moderate luxury is not to identify in it anything particularly unique. Thus, the first aim of this paper is to clarify the nature of Hume’s contribution to the ongoing luxury debates. This does not consist merely of an (...)
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  3.  31
    The Idea of Chivalry in the Scottish Enlightenment.Ryu Susato - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):155-178.
    It is generally assumed that in early modern Britain, chivalry—allegedly typified by the Crusades—was considered a negative or even ridiculous ideology until its rehabilitation by the pre-Romantic movement. However, this paper argues that Hume and other Scottish Enlightenment thinkers had already shown a deep interest in its historical role and influence on modern civilization. That Hume shared a broad interest in chivalry with contemporary philosophers does not undermine the novelty of his thought on this topic. In fact, the pioneering and (...)
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  4.  27
    Taming “The Tyranny of Priests”: Hume’s Advocacy of Religious Establishments.Ryu Susato - 2012 - Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (2):273-293.
  5.  3
    An “Ingenious Moralist”: Bernard Mandeville as a Precursor of Bentham.Ryu Susato - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (3):335-349.
    This article argues that Bernard Mandeville's ideas were more likely to have influenced Jeremy Bentham's writings than previously believed. The conventional interpretation of Mandeville as a forerunner of the Hayekian “theory of spontaneous order” has obscured Mandeville and Bentham's shared emphasis on legal and interventionist solutions for the issues of prostitution and prisoners. This influence is evinced by focusing on some of Mandeville's minor works, which anticipated some of Bentham's arguments. It is unlikely that Bentham directly knew of Mandeville's minor (...)
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  6.  9
    David Hume. [REVIEW]Ryu Susato - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):240-242.
  7.  32
    David Hume's Political Theory: Law, Commerce, and the Constitution of Government (Review).Ryu Susato - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 146-147.
    As its title suggests, this work provides a wide-ranging discussion and interpretation of David Hume’s political philosophy. McArthur’s main arguments are threefold. First, the watershed between civilized and barbarous societies for Hume lies in the establishment of the rule of law. According to the author, what Hume called a “civilized monarchy,” though falling short of the ideal republic, can be regarded as a civilized form of government. This is because Hume believed that, with the exception of the monarch him- or (...)
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  8.  14
    Hume as an Ami de la Liberte: The Reception of His “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth”.Ryu Susato - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History:1-28.
  9.  5
    Hume as an Ami de la Liberté: The Reception of His “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth”.Ryu Susato - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (3):569-596.
    Despite the recent boom in research on the reception and influence of Hume's writings, most scholars have overlooked the fact that his enigmatic essay “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth,” published in thePolitical Discoursesin 1752, not only attracted the attention of some French intellectuals before and after the Revolution, but was also taken seriously by a significant number of radicals—such as Paine, Price, Godwin, Wollstonecraft—and other reform-minded Whigs—such as James Mackintosh. Although the influence of Hume's plan onThe Federalist, No 10, has (...)
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  10.  22
    Hume's Oscillating Civilization Theory.Ryu Susato - 2006 - History of European Ideas 32 (3):263-277.
    Hume's repeated mentions of the vicissitudes of civilization have thus far been neglected, overlooked, or misinterpreted by Hume scholars. Although his references to the “death” or “ruin” of a nation are somewhat hyperbolic, his cyclical view of history was neither mere rhetoric nor necessarily pessimistic. This paper aims to show that Hume's notion of historical fluctuations was deeply connected with his understanding of the universality of human nature. It also placed Hume in a strategic position from which he could criticize (...)
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  11. Hume's Skeptical Enlightenment.Ryu Susato - 2015 - University of Edinburgh Press.
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  12.  8
    "Politics May Be Reduced To a Science"?: Between Politics and Economics in Hume's Concepts of Convention.Ryu Susato - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (1):81-89.
    Many Hume scholars have partially anticipated the essential links between his magnum opus—the History of England—and other writings, but we lacked an appropriate theoretical framework. According to Andrew Sabl,2 the key to the breakthrough is provided by “coordination theory.” The approach to Hume’s work through the lens of twentieth-century political theories has been preceded, to take one example, by Russell Hardin, who envisions Hume’s notion of convention as a prototype of game theory. Hardin also mentions coordination theory in relation to (...)
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  13.  22
    David Hume[REVIEW]Ryu Susato - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):240-242.
    In this book Professor Berry concisely and convincingly demonstrates two points: the various reasons “why Hume’s thought has indeed been frequently read as a contributor to or progenitor of conservatism” (154), and why the author nonetheless disagrees with this assessment. According to Berry, to identify some—or in fact many—elements or strains of conservative thoughts in Hume’s writings is one thing and to classify him as a conservative thinker another. Berry picks up four major themes of analysis: Hume’s theories of causation (...)
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