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Stephen David Edwards
University of Zululand
  1. Should Oscar Pistorius Be Excluded From the 2008 Olympic Games?S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):112 – 125.
    This paper discusses the predicament of Oscar Pistorius. He is a Paralympic gold medallist who wishes to participate in the Olympics in Beijing in 2008. Following a brief introductory section, the paper discusses the arguments that could be, and have been, deployed against his participation in the Olympics, should he make the qualifying time for his chosen event (400m). The next section discusses a more hypothetical argument based upon a specific understanding of the fair opportunity rule. According to this, there (...)
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  2.  60
    The Ashley Treatment: A Step Too Far, or Not Far Enough?S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):341-343.
    This “current controversies” contribution describes the recent case of a severely disabled six year old girl who has been subjected to a range of medical interventions at the request of her parents and with the permission of a hospital clinical ethics committee. The interventions prescribed have become known as “the Ashley treatment” and involve the performance of invasive medical procedures (eg, hysterectomy) and oestrogen treatment. A central aim of the treatment is to restrict the growth of the child and thus (...)
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  3.  50
    Disability, Identity and the "Expressivist Objection".S. D. Edwards - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):418-420.
    The practice of prenatal screening for disability is sometimes objected to because of the hurt and offence such practices may cause to people currently living with disabilities. This objection is commonly termed “the expressivist objection”. In response to the objection it is standardly claimed that disabilities are analogous to illnesses. And just as it would be implausible to suppose reduction of the incidence of illnesses such as flu sends a negative message to ill people, so it is not plausible to (...)
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  4.  15
    The Art of Nursing.S. D. Edwards - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (5):393-400.
    This article discusses the question of whether, as is often claimed, nursing is properly described as an art. Following critical remarks on the claims of Carper, Chinn and Watson, and Johnson, the account of art provided by RG Collingwood is described, with particular reference to his influential distinction between art and craft. The question of whether nursing is best described as an art or a craft is then discussed. The conclusion is advanced that nursing cannot properly be described as an (...)
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  5.  14
    Ethical Concerns Regarding Guidelines for the Conduct of Clinical Research on Children.S. D. Edwards - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):351-354.
    In this article we examine ethical aspects of the involvement of children in clinical research, specifically those who are incapable of giving informed consent to participate. The topic is, of course, not a new one in medical ethics but there are some tensions in current guidelines that, in our view, need to be made explicit and which need to be responded to by the relevant official bodies. In particular, we focus on tensions between the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki, (...)
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  6.  24
    Prevention of Disability on Grounds of Suffering.S. D. Edwards - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):380-382.
    This paper examines one particular justification for the screening and termination of embryos/fetuses which possess genetic features known to cause disability. The particular case is that put forward in several places by John Harris. He argues that the obligation to prevent needless suffering justifies the prevention of the births of disabled neonates. The paper begins by rehearsing Harris's case. Then, drawing upon claims advanced in a recent paper in the Journal of Medical Ethics, it is subjected to critical scrutiny, focusing (...)
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  7.  19
    Safeguarding Children in Clinical Research.S. D. Edwards - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):530-537.
    Current UK guidelines regarding clinical research on children permit research that is non-therapeutic from the perspective of that particular child. The guidelines permit research interventions that cause temporary pain, bruises or scars. It is argued here that such research conflicts with the Declaration of Helsinki according to which the interests of the research subject outweigh all other interests. Given this, in the context of clinical research, who is best placed to protect the child from this kind of exploitation? Is it (...)
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  8.  57
    What Are the Limits to the Obligations of the Nurse?S. D. Edwards - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):90-94.
    This paper enquires into the nature and the extent of the obligations of nurses. It is argued that nurses appear to be obliged to undertake supererogatory acts if they take clause one of the United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (UKCC) Code of Professional Conduct seriously (as, indeed, they are required to do). In the first part of the paper, the nature of nursing obligations is outlined, and then the groups and individuals to whom nurses have (...)
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  9.  25
    The Moral Status of Intellectually Disabled Individuals.S. D. Edwards - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):29-42.
    The moral status accorded to an individual (or class of individuals) helps to account for the weight of the moral obligations considered due to an individual (or class of individuals). Strong arguments can be given to indicate that the moral status accorded, justly or unjustly, to individuals with intellectual disabilities is less than that accorded to those considered intellectually able. This paper suggests that such a view of the moral status of intellectually disabled individuals derives from individualism. Ontological and normative (...)
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  10.  25
    An Argument Against Research on People with Intellectual Disabilities.S. D. Edwards - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):69-73.
  11.  22
    Dismantling the Disability/Handicap Distinction.S. D. Edwards - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (6):589-606.
    This paper discusses the distinction between disability and handicap as it is proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in their publication International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (WHO, 1993 (first published, 1980)). Following criticism of this an attempt to salvage the distinction by Nordenfelt (1993, 1983) is discussed. It is argued that neither the WHO nor Nordenfelt are successful in their attempts to preserve the distinction between disability and handicap in a theoretically wellmotivated manner. Contrary to the WHO, (...)
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  12.  5
    Disability Rights and Wrongs. [REVIEW]S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):222-222.
    Tom Shakepeare is an eminent, and somewhat controversial, contributor to disability studies. As he outlines, part of the explanation for his controversial status within that field stems from his engagement with disciplines outside it, including genetics and bioethics. For many in the field of disability studies, no genuine engagement should be sought with scholars in genetics or bioethics because—so the party line goes—these areas of study are inherently opposed to disability rights and otherwise pose genuine threats to the status of (...)
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  13.  43
    Review of Disability Rights and Wrongs by Tom Shakespeare. [REVIEW]S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):222-222.
    Tom Shakepeare is an eminent, and somewhat controversial, contributor to disability studies. As he outlines, part of the explanation for his controversial status within that field stems from his engagement with disciplines outside it, including genetics and bioethics. For many in the field of disability studies, no genuine engagement should be sought with scholars in genetics or bioethics because—so the party line goes—these areas of study are inherently opposed to disability rights and otherwise pose genuine threats to the status of (...)
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  14.  32
    The Impairment/Disability Distinction: A Response to Shakespeare.S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):26-27.
    Tom Shakespeare’s important new book includes, among other topics, a persuasive critique of the social model of disability. A key component in his case against that model consists in an argument against the impairment/disability distinction as this is understood within the social model. The present paper focuses on the case Shakespeare makes against that distinction. Three arguments mounted by Shakespeare are summarised and responded to. It is argued that the responses adequately rebut Shakespeare’s case on this specific issue. Moreover, as (...)
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