Results for 'S. Dam'

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Soksan Dam
Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University
  1.  65
    Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The (...)
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  2.  64
    Heres My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The (...)
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  3.  5
    Translational neonatology research: transformative encounters across species and disciplines.Mie S. Dam, Per T. Sangild & Mette N. Svendsen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):21.
    This paper explores the laborious and intimate work of turning bodies of research animals into models of human patients. Based on ethnographic research in the interdisciplinary Danish (...)
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  4.  24
    Whose DAM Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman.Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida & Eliana Colunga - 2003 - Cognition 87 (3):209-213.
  5.  8
    Organizing Moral Case Deliberation Experiences in Two Dutch Nursing Homes.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, A. C. Molewijk, M. J. M. Kardol, Jmga Schols & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (3):327-340.
    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a specific form of clinical ethics, aiming to stimulate ethical reflection in daily practice in order to improve the quality of care. (...)
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  6.  3
    Mouse avatars of human cancers: the temporality of translation in precision oncology.Sara Green, Mie S. Dam & Mette N. Svendsen - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-22.
    Patient-derived xenografts are currently promoted as new translational models in precision oncology. PDXs are immunodeficient mice with human tumors that are used as surrogate models to (...)represent specific types of cancer. By accounting for the genetic heterogeneity of cancer tumors, PDXs are hoped to provide more clinically relevant results in preclinical research. Further, in the function of so-calledmouse avatars”, PDXs are hoped to allow for patient-specific drug testing in real-time. This paper examines the circulation of knowledge and bodily material across the species boundary of human and personalized mouse model, historically as well as in contemporary practices. PDXs raise interesting questions about the relation between animal model and human patient, and about the capacity of hybrid or interspecies models to close existing translational gaps. We highlight that the translational potential of PDXs not only depends on representational matching of model and target, but also on temporal alignment between model development and practical uses. Aside from the importance of ensuring temporal stability of human tumors in a murine body, the mouse avatar concept rests on the possibility of aligning the temporal horizons of the clinic and the lab. We examine strategies to address temporal challenges, including cryopreservation and biobanking, as well as attempts to speed up translation through modification and use of faster developing organisms. We discuss how featured model virtues change with precision oncology, and contend that temporality is a model feature that deserves more philosophical attention. (shrink)
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  7.  6
    How Dams Climb Mountains: China and Indias State-Making Hydropower Contest in the Eastern-Himalaya Watershed.Ruth Gamble - 2019 - Thesis Eleven 150 (1):42-67.
    The dam rush in the upper-Brahmaputra River basin and local, minority resistance to it are the result of complex geopolitical and parochial causes. India and Chinas (...) competing claims for sovereignty over the watershed depend upon British and Qing Dynasty imperial precedents respectively. And the two nation-states have extended and enhanced their predecessorsclaims on the area by continuing to erase local sovereignty, enclose the commons, and extract natural resources on a large scale. Historically, the upper basins terrain forestalled the thorough integration of this region into both nation-states, but recent technological and economic advances have enabled the two states and their agents to dramatically transformed these landscapes. Many of their projects have perpetuated the interventionist hydrological regimes that India and China also inherited from their imperial forebears. Nevertheless, as with their definition of their borders, neither state has highlighted this historical contingency. Instead, both governments have consistently presented their hydropower projects as shining examples of necessary and benevolent development. Their economy-focused, monolithic development paradigms have, not coincidently, also enabled the systemic side-lining of non-majority cultures, religions and histories. The combination of this cultural exclusion and the nation-stateslate integration of this peripheral region has laid the ground for conflict with local groups over the dam rush. Local identities and experiences have evolved around complex religious, cultural and trade networks, many of which were heavily influenced by the now-defunct Tibetan polity, rather than via modern Chinese and Indian nationalist discourses of development. The dam clashes highlight both the basins complex cultural matrixes and the ambiguous relationship Asias two most populous nation-states have with their respective imperial pasts. And as the situation remains unresolved, the watershed is an ecological catastrophe in waiting. (shrink)
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  8.  17
    Morality in the Mundane: Specific Needs for Ethics Support in Elderly Care.L. Dauwerse, S. van der Dam & T. Abma - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (1):91-103.
    Ethics support is called for to improve the quality of care in elderly institutions. Various forms of ethics support are presented, but the needs for ethics support (...)
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  9.  4
    Dam's Religious Teachers of Greece[REVIEW]G. Santayana - 1909 - Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):23.
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  10.  9
    Nations Body, Rivers Pulse: Narratives of Anti-Dam Politics in India.Amita Baviskar - 2019 - Thesis Eleven 150 (1):26-41.
    In the 1990s, social movements against large dams in India were celebrated for crafting a powerful challenge to dominant policies of development. These grounded struggles were acclaimed (...)
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  11.  99
    Damming the Swamping Problem, Reliably.Jared Bates - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (1):103-116.
    The swamping problem is the problem of explaining why reliabilist knowledge (reliable true belief) has greater value than mere true belief. Swamping problem advocates see the lack (...)
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  12.  82
    Cultural Values and International Differences in Business Ethics.Bert Scholtens & Lammertjan Dam - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):273-284.
    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country (...)
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  13.  3
    Dams's Advertising and its Mental Laws[REVIEW]Warner Brown - 1917 - Journal of Philosophy 14 (11):303.
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  14.  56
    Flexibility in Embodied Language Processing: Context Effects in Lexical Access.Wessel O. Dam, Inti A. Brazil, Harold Bekkering & Shirley‐Ann Rueschemeyer - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):407-424.
    According to embodied theories of language (ETLs), word meaning relies on sensorimotor brain areas, generally dedicated to acting and perceiving in the real world. More specifically, words (...)
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  15.  13
    Adorno's TwoTrack Conceptualization of Progress: The New Categorical Imperative and Politics of Remembrance.Volkan Çıdam - 2021 - Constellations 28 (1):79-94.
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  16.  3
    Psychometric Properties and Validation of the EMOTICOM Test Battery in a Healthy Danish Population.Vibeke H. Dam, Christa K. Thystrup, Peter S. Jensen, Amy R. Bland, Erik L. Mortensen, Rebecca Elliott, Barbara J. Sahakian, Gitte M. Knudsen, Vibe G. Frokjaer & Dea S. Stenbæk - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  17.  16
    Rancières sentiments.Çiğdem Çıdam - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):28-32.
  18.  13
    The Two Dams and That Damned Paresis.John W. Carroll - 1999 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (1):65-81.
    Philosophers of science take it as a datum that Mayor John's having syphilis explains why he, rather than certain nonsyphilitics, had paresis. Using a new hypothetical (...)example, the case of the two dams, it is argued that three independent considerations invalidate these philosophers' starting point. (shrink)
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  19.  7
    Rome's Holy Mountain: The Capitoline Hill in Late Antiquity by Jason Moralee.Raymond Van Dam - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (4):371-372.
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  20. Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209213.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz - 2003 - Cognition 87:237-239.
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  21.  10
    Barbarians Within the Gates of Rome: A Study of Roman Military Policy and the Barbarians, Ca. 375-425 A.D.Thomas S. Burns[REVIEW]Raymond Van Dam - 1997 - Speculum 72 (2):444-446.
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  22.  23
    In The Name of Atheism. A Critical Response to Philipp Blom's Book ‘A Wicked Company’.Elisabeth Van Dam - 2013 - Philosophica 88.
  23.  20
    Rereading Dam Street in the Chinese Cultural Context.Zhaohui Liu, Yushan Zhao & Hui Liu - 2014 - Asian Culture and History 6 (2):70-76.
    As an emerging film director, Yu Li has yet to be recognized by the international academic critics. By examining Hongyan/Dam Street in the Chinese cultural context (...)with the assistance of analyzing scenes in detail and the films visual style, this article argues that the film illustrates the protagonist Xiaoyun is stuck between traditions and modernity, providing a sophisticated insight to an important feminist issue. The reading of the traditions involves chastity code, the image of a rouge face which is the translation of the films Chinese title, the Chinese four-character idioms, the time-honoured terms, the development of feminism, and the characteristics of the modernity in China. The perversity of the modernity originates from the social commercialization. Prejudices from the traditions and the modernity leave little space for women to settle in. (shrink)
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  24.  2
    Projets D'Aménagement Hydraulique, Concertation Et Planification Participative de Bassin : Une Approche En Terme DAction Publique Négociée »Dam Projects, “Concertationand River-Basin Participative Planning. ANegotiated Public ActionPerspective.S. Allain - 2003 - Nature Sciences Sociétés 11 (3):255-265.
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  25.  64
    On Emotion and Rationality: a Response to Barrett.Ellis Van Dam & Jan Steutel - 1996 - Journal of Moral Education 25 (4):395-400.
    Abstract In a recent paper Richard Barrett criticises Solomon (and the so?called cognitivists in general) for dismissing irrational emotions as marginal and atypical. This paper argues (...)that Barrett's criticism is unwarranted. Two explanations are suggested for his misconception of Solomon's view (and, more generally, of the cognitive view) on irrational emotions. First, Barrett mistakenly conceives the reconciliation of emotion and reason as a conciliation of emotion and rationality in an evaluative or normative sense. Secondly, Barrett disregards the difference between the cognitive conception of (ir)rationality and his own definition of (ir)rationality in terms of coping. Some implications of the argument for the education of (moral) emotions are spelled out. (shrink)
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  26.  41
    A Politics of Love? Antonio Negri on Revolution and Democracy.Çiğdem Çıdam - 2013 - Contemporary Political Theory 12 (1):26-45.
    This article critically analyzes Antonio Negri's democratic theory by exploring the theoretical significance of a concept that begins to appear in his writings after the 1990s, (...)namely the concept oflove’. Negri's turn to love in the closing pages of his most recent books is puzzling, especially given his earlier recourse to notions of antagonistic struggle, direct confrontation and even violence. Using Jacques Derrida's conception ofthe supplementfor interpretive purposes, I argue that the concept of love not only enriches Negri's account of democracy, but also points to a lack within his political thought. During the 1970s, as one of the leading figures of autonomist Marxism, Negri called for a radicalization of antagonism and the use of violence to ensure the political organization of the revolutionary subject without giving up on the emancipatory potential ofdirect and immediateaction. In his recent writings, Negri has supplemented the notion oflovefor his earlier emphasis on antagonism to address autonomist Marxism's unresolved question of political organization. And yet, this turn to love comes at a price. Negri's understanding of love as the creative force of revolutionary consciousness leads him to erase the process of political contestation and mediation involved in the constitution of political struggles. Love, then, operates as a dangerous supplement, undermining Negri's commitment to multiplicity and diversity as central aspects of his democratic theory. (shrink)
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  27.  10
    Microglial Priming and Alzheimers Disease: A Possible Role for Immune Challenges and Epigenetics?Lianne Hoeijmakers, Yvonne Heinen, Anne-Marie van Dam, Paul J. Lucassen & Aniko Korosi - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  28.  1
    Prevalence and Correlates of Social Stigma Toward Diabetes: Results From a Nationwide- Survey in Singapore.Mythily Subramaniam, Edimansyah Abdin, S. Bhuvaneswari, P. V. AshaRani, Fiona Devi, Kumarasan Roystonn, Peizhi Wang, Ellaisha Samari, Saleha Shafie, Janhavi Ajit Vaingankar, Rob M. van Dam, Eng Sing Lee, Chee Fang Sum & Siow Ann Chong - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Aims: To examine the extent of social stigma toward diabetes among Singapore's multi-ethnic general population and determine whether this differs across socio-demographic sub-groups.Methods: Data (...) for this study came from a nationwide cross-sectional study. A diabetes stigma questionnaire comprising Social Distance Scale and Negative Attitudes and Stereotyping Scale was administered to those respondents who had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to determine the dimensionality of the instruments and validated using confirmatory factor analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to examine associations between socio-demographic factors and measures of diabetes stigma.Results: In all, 2,895 participants were recruited from the general population giving a response rate of 66.2%. Factor analyses found that a one-factor model resulted in an acceptable fit for both stigma scales, which measured social distance and negative attitudes and stereotyping, respectively. Multiple linear regression analyses identified Indian ethnicity, higher personal income and having close friends or family members who had been diagnosed with diabetes to be significantly associated with lower social distance scores while those aged 5064 years and those with secondary and vocational education were significantly associated with higher social distance scores. Those with a personal income of SG$2,0003,999 and SGD $6,000 and above, and those with close friends or family members diagnosed with diabetes were significantly associated with lower negative attitudes and stereotyping scores. In contrast those aged 35 years and above, those with primary education and below, and those of Malay ethnicity were significantly associated with higher negative attitudes and stereotyping scores.Conclusions: The study found a relatively low level of stigma toward diabetes in the general population of Singapore, although some stigmatizing beliefs emerged. While greater knowledge of diabetes could reduce stigma, anti-stigma messaging should be incorporated into theWar on Diabetesprogramme in Singapore. (shrink)
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  29.  3
    Psychometric Properties of the Verbal Affective Memory Test-26 and Evaluation of Affective Biases in Major Depressive Disorder.Liv V. Hjordt, Brice Ozenne, Sophia Armand, Vibeke H. Dam, Christian G. Jensen, Kristin Köhler-Forsberg, Gitte M. Knudsen & Dea S. Stenbæk - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  30.  7
    Bernard Zijlstra, From Pluralism to Collectivism. The Development of Harold Laski's Political Thought. Diss. Free Univ. A'Dam. Van Gorcum & Comp. N.V. Assen, 1968[REVIEW] Hommes - 1969 - Philosophia Reformata 34 (3-4):180-182.
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  31. Power Plant Threat Tackled; Crews Reinforce Dam to Keep Out Wabamun Oil Tide.Kristen Vernon & S. U. N. Edmonton - 2005 - In Alan F. Blackwell & David Mackay (eds.), Power. Cambridge University Press.
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  32. "Cultural Additivity" and How the Values and Norms of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism Co-Exist, Interact, and Influence Vietnamese Society: A Bayesian Analysis of Long-Standing Folktales, Using R and Stan.Quan-Hoang Vuong, Manh-Tung Ho, Viet-Phuong La, Dam Van Nhue, Bui Quang Khiem, Nghiem Phu Kien Cuong, Thu-Trang Vuong, Manh-Toan Ho, Hong Kong T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha T. Nguyen, Hiep-Hung Pham & Nancy K. Napier - manuscript
    Every year, the Vietnamese people reportedly burned about 50,000 tons of joss papers, which took the form of not only bank notes, but iPhones, cars, clothes, (...)even housekeepers, in hope of pleasing the dead. The practice was mistakenly attributed to traditional Buddhist teachings but originated in fact from China, which most Vietnamese were not aware of. In other aspects of life, there were many similar examples of Vietnamese so ready and comfortable with adding new norms, values, and beliefs, even contradictory ones, to their culture. This phenomenon, dubbedcultural additivity”, prompted us to study the co-existence, interaction, and influences among core values and norms of the Three TeachingsConfucianism, Buddhism, and Taoismas shown through Vietnamese folktales. By applying Bayesian logistic regression, we evaluated the possibility of whether the key message of a story was dominated by a religion (dependent variables), as affected by the appearance of values and anti-values pertaining to the Three Teachings in the story (independent variables). Our main findings included the existence of the cultural additivity of Confucian and Taoist values. More specifically, empirical results showed that the interaction or addition of the values of Taoism and Confucianism in folktales together helped predict whether the key message of a story was about Confucianism, β{VTVC} = 0.86. Meanwhile, there was no such statistical tendency for Buddhism. The results lead to a number of important implications. First, this showed the dominance of Confucianism because the fact that Confucian and Taoist values appeared together in a story led to the storys key message dominated by Confucianism. Thus, it presented the evidence of Confucian dominance and against liberal interpretations of the concept of the Common Roots of Three Religions (“tam giáo đồng nguyên”) as religious unification or unicity. Second, the concept ofcultural additivitycould help explain many interesting socio-cultural phenomena, namely the absence of religious intolerance and extremism in the Vietnamese society, outrageous cases of sophistry in education, the low productivity in creative endeavors like science and technology, the misleading branding strategy in business. We are aware that our results are only preliminary and more studies, both theoretical and empirical, must be carried out to give a full account of the explanatory reach ofcultural additivity”. (shrink)
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  33.  15
    Embodied Grounding of Memory: Toward the Effects of Motor Execution on Memory Consolidation.Wessel O. van Dam, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer, Harold Bekkering & Oliver Lindemann - forthcoming - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.
    Behavioural and neuroscientific research has provided evidence for a strong functional link between the neural motor system and lexical?semantic processing of action-related language. It remains unclear (...), however, whether the impact of motor actions is restricted to online language comprehension or whether sensorimotor codes are also important in the formation and consolidation of persisting memory representations of the word's referents. The current study now demonstrates that recognition performance for action words is modulated by motor actions performed during the retention interval. Specifically, participants were required to learn words denoting objects that were associated with either a pressing or a twisting action (e.g., piano, screwdriver) and words that were not associated to actions. During a 6?8-minute retention phase, participants performed an intervening task that required the execution of pressing or twisting responses. A subsequent recognition task revealed a better memory for words that denoted objects for which the functional use was congruent with the action performed during the retention interval (e.g., pepper mill?twisting action, doorbell?pressing action) than for words that denoted objects for which the functional use was incongruent. In further experiments, we were able to generalize this effect of selective memory enhancement of words by performing congruent motor actions to an implicit perceptual (Experiment 2) and implicit semantic memory test (Experiment 3). Our findings suggest that a reactivation of motor codes affects the process of memory consolidation and emphasizes therefore the important role of sensorimotor codes in establishing enduring semantic representations. The authors thank Pascal de Water and Gerard van Oijen for technical support and Markus van Ackeren for help in creating stimulus material. The authors would also like to thank Eelco van Dongen, Michael Masson, Art Glenberg, and Diane Pecher for helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. The study was supported by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research NWO-VICI grant (453-05-001) to the third author and NWO-VENI grant (016-094-053) to the last author. (shrink)
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  34.  3
    Deliberating or Stalling for Justice? Dynamics of Corporate Remediation and Victim Resistance Through the Lens of Parentalism: The Fundão Dam Collapse and the Renova Foundation in Brazil.Rajiv Maher - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    Using the political corporate social responsibility lens of parentalism, this paper investigates the more subtle and less-visible interactional dynamics and strategies of power, resistance and justification (...)that manifest between a multi-stakeholder-governed foundation and victims of a mining corporations dam collapse. The Renova Foundation was established to provide remedy through a deliberative approach to hundreds of thousands of victims from Brazils worst socio-environmental disasterthe collapse of Samarco Mining Corporations Fundão tailings dam. Data were collected from a combination of fieldwork and archival analysis to assess the perceptions of victims, their defenders and foundation executives. The findings reveal 12 dialectical tensions from Renovas attempts to remedy the victims injustices. The case analysis contributes through proposing a dialectical process model of how stakeholder resistance and subversion to parentalist PCSR. The case reveals the pivotal use of time via the act of stalling as a strategic resource to exhaust victims and reach settlements. Furthermore, organizations justify their parentalism by blaming delays on the bureaucracy and shared responsibility of multi-stakeholder deliberation. Ultimately, I contend that victims must have an equal voice in the outcome of their remediation and that businesses responsible for causing harm should not decide these matters. (shrink)
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  35.  51
    Deities, Devils, and Dams: Elizabeth I, Dover Harbour and the Family of Love.David Wootton - 2009 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 162, 2008 Lectures. pp. 45.
    This lecture presents the text of the speech about Elizabeth I Queen of England delivered by the author at the 2008 Raleigh Lecture on History held at (...)
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  36.  41
    Art as Alchemy: The Bildobjekt Interpretation of Pictorial Illusion.Jens Dam Ziska - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):225-234.
    I argue that if we read E. H. Gombrich's Art and Illusion with the charity that it deserves, we will find a much subtler theory of (...)depiction than the illusion theory that is usually attributed to Gombrich. Instead of suggesting that pictures are illusory because they cause us to have experiences as of seeing the depicted objects face to face, I argue that Art and Illusion is better read as making the point that naturalistic pictures are illusory because they cause us to see qualities and properties that the pictures themselves do not possess. Once we appreciate this point, we will be in a better position to appraise the value and limits of naturalistic art. (shrink)
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  37. Book Reviews : Considering Education in the 1980s and 1990s: Lynda Stone (Ed.) The Education Feminism Reader New York and London: Routledge, 1994, 380 Pp., ISBN 0-415-90800-0. Gaby Weiner Feminisms in Education: An Introduction Philadelphia and Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 1994, 166 Pp., ISBN 0-335-19052-9[REVIEW]Sabine Severiens & Geert ten Dam - 1997 - European Journal of Women's Studies 4 (1):115-120.
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  38. Assessing Water Scarcity and Watershed Development in Maharashtra, India: A Case Study of the Baliraja Memorial Dam.Roopali Phadke - 2002 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 27 (2):236-261.
    In the drought-prone regions of Maharashtra State, a growing social movement for equitable water distribution is engaging the help of engineers to build technical projects. This (...)movement aims to challenge the states agroindustrial development model favoring water-intensive sugarcane farming by redistributing water. This article examines the Baliraja Memorial Dam, located in southwestern Maharashtra. Through the dam, 400 families in the villages of Balawadi and Tandulwadi will receive a share of water for irrigation and domestic needs. This article explores the Baliraja Dam as an appropriate technology project designed jointly by village farmers, engineers, and social activists. Through this unique alliance, Baliraja was designed to meet the needs of ecological restoration, community empowerment, and democratic technological design. The pioneering success of the Baliraja effort has prompted other communities to pressure the state irrigation bureaucracy to address the ecological and human costs of prolonged drought and water misuse. (shrink)
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  39.  1
    On the Use of an Improved Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm-Backpropagation Neural Network for Predicting Dam Deformation Behavior.Bo Dai, Hao Gu, Yantao Zhu, Siyu Chen & E. Fernandez Rodriguez - 2020 - Complexity 2020:1-13.
    Dam behavior is difficult to predict due to its complexity. At the same time, dam deformation behavior is vital to dam systems. Developing a precise prediction model (...)
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  40.  63
    Dai Zhen's Defense of SelfInterest.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):29-45.
    This paper is devoted to explicating Dai Zhens defense of self-interested desires, over and against a tradition that sets strict limits to their range and function (...) in moral agency. I begin by setting the terms of the debate between Dai and his opponents, noting that the dispute turns largely on the moral status of directly self-interested desires, or desires for ones own good as such. I then consider three of Dais arguments against views that miscategorize or undervalue directly self-interested desires. I begin with the most widely recognized line of defense, which holds that the suppression of such desires makes those in positions of authority less sensitive to the mistreatment of those with whose interests they are entrusted. I call this thePity for the Powerlessargument. I then explore an argument that Dai offers in the form of a multi-faceted metaphor, which likens the suppression of desires to attempts to block or dam natural waterways. I call this is theDamming the Desiresargument. I conclude with a brief summary of a third and fundamental defense implied by structural features of ethics as Dai understands them. On my reading, Dai thinks ethics is concerned first and foremost with the character traits and resultant behavior that allow us to participate in relationships, and the relationships in question are mutually beneficial, not one-sided or reciprocal. I call this theArgument from Mutual Fulfillment.” On the view spelled out here, directly self-interested desires are not just morally tolerable, nor is the possession of them merely a necessary condition for the possession of moral virtue; instead, moral virtue is constituted in part by self-interested desires. This is the strong position that Dai endorses when he characterizes the Confucian path as theway of mutual fulfillment.”. (shrink)
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  41.  27
    Population Dynamics Modelling in an Hierarchical Arborescent River Network: An Attempt with Salmo Trutta.S. Charles, R. Bravo de la Parra, J. P. Mallet, H. Persat & P. Auger - 1998 - Acta Biotheoretica 46 (3):223-234.
    The balance between births and deaths in an age-structured population is strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of sub-populations. Our aim was to describe the demographic (...) process of a fish population in an hierarchical dendritic river network, by taking into account the possible movements of individuals. We tried also to quantify the effect of river network changes (damming or channelling) on the global fish population dynamics. The Salmo trutta life pattern was taken as an example for.We proposed a model which includes the demographic and the migration processes, considering migration fast compared to demography. The population was divided into three age-classes and subdivided into fifteen spatial patches, thus having 45 state variables. Both processes were described by means of constant transfer coefficients, so we were dealing with a linear system of difference equations. The discrete case of the variable aggregation method allowed the study of the system through the dominant elements of a much simpler linear system with only three global variables: the total number of individuals in each age-class. (shrink)
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  42.  5
    Contestation ofthe Holy Places in the Zimbabwean Religious Landscape’: A Study of the Johane Masowe Chishanu yeNyenyedzi Churchs Sacred Places.Phillip Musoni - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (1).
    Places that are regarded as holy are highly esteemed in most religious institutions. Such places are revered because they denote the converging points of human beings and (...)
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  43. Made by Each Other: Organisms and Their Environment[REVIEW]Kim Sterelny - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):21-36.
    The standard picture of evolution, is externalist: a causal arrow runs from environment to organism, and that arrow explains why organisms are as they are (Godfrey-Smith (...)1996). Natural selection allows a lineage to accommodate itself to the specifics of its environment. As the interior of Australia became hotter and drier, phenotypes changed in many lineages of plants and animals, so that those organisms came to suit the new conditions under which they lived. Odling-Smee, Laland and Feldman, building on the work of Richard Lewontin, have shown that while sometimes appropriate, this is an inadequate conception of the relationship between organisms and the environments in which they live. Over time organisms alter their environment as well as being altered by their environments (Lewontin 1982; Lewontin 1983; Lewontin 1985). For example, animals modulate the effects of their physical and biological environment by building shelters: the beavers dam and lodge system, and termite mounds are two famous cases of animal structures, but they are few of many. There are many thousands of animals which make nests, burrows and other shelters. Likewise, animals make tools that give them access to resources from which they would otherwise be excluded: thus the Galapagos woodpecker finch uses a cactus needle to extract insects from crevasses in barkinsects that they would otherwise be unable to catch (Tebbich, Taborsky et al. 2001). Tool making is not as common as shelter-making, but it is common. For example many animals make traps: there are many species of pit-making antlions. Thus in part organisms make the world in which they live. They partially construct their own niches. Odling-Smee, Laland and Feldman argue that this has five major and under-appreciated consequences for biological theory. (shrink)
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  44.  50
    The Alkaline Solution to the Emergence of Life: Energy, Entropy and Early Evolution.Michael J. Russell - 2007 - Acta Biotheoretica 55 (2):133-179.
    The Earth agglomerates and heats. Convection cells within the planetary interior expedite the cooling process. Volcanoes evolve steam, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and pyrophosphate. An acidulous Hadean (...)
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  45.  30
    Technology, Objects and Things in Heidegger.Graham Harman - 2010 - Cambridge Journal of Economics 34 (1):17-25.
    Martin Heidegger is famous for his early analysis of tools, and equally famous for his later reflections on technology. This might suggest an easy literal reading of (...)
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  46. Il sistema della ricchezza. Economia politica e problema del metodo in Adam Smith.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1984 - Milano, Italy: Franco Angeli.
    Introduction. The book is a study in Adam Smith's system of ideas; its aim is to reconstruct the peculiar framework that Adam Smiths work provided for (...) the shaping of a semi-autonomous new discipline, political economy; the approach adopted lies somewhere in-between the history of ideas and the history of economic analysis. My two claims are: i) The Wealth of Nations has a twofold structure, including a `natural history' of opulence and an `imaginary machine' of wealth. The imaginary machine is a kind of Newtonian theory, whose connecting links are principles; provided either by `partial' characteristics of human nature or by analoga of physical mechanisms transferred to the social world; ii) a domain of the economic, understood as a self-standing social sub-system, was discovered first by Adam Smith. His `discovery' of the new continent of the economic was an `unintended result' of a deviation in his voyage to the never-found archipelago of natural jurisprudence. -/- 1. Imaginary machines and invisible chains: natural philosophy and method. The first chapter reconstructs Smith's views on the method in natural philosophy, presented primarily in the History of Astronomy (HA). The peculiar kind of semi-sceptical Newtonianism which permeates the essay is highlighted. Its reconstruction of the history of one natural science is shown to be based on the assumptions of Humes epistemology, and to lead to a self-aware deadlock. Smith's dilemma is between an essentialist realism and sceptical instrumentalism; the Cartesian presuppositions he shares with Hume and with the 18th century as a whole make it impossible for him to overcome his dilemma. The following chapters will show how, on the one hand, Smith's skeptical methodology encourages him in the enterprise to `carve off' a new self-contained discipline and how, on the other hand, his epistemological dilemma is reflected in the inner tensions of his moral and political theory as well as in a number of basic oscillations concerning the status of the new discipline. -/- 2. Chessboards and clocks: moral philosophy and method. -/- The second chapter reconstructs Smith's views on the method in the parallel field of moral philosophy, including the theory of moral sentiments and natural jurisprudence. I argue that The Theory of Moral Sentiments, when considered together with with the Lectures on Jurisprudence, where Smith's peculiar version of a `weaker' form of natural law is presented, wins special interest, not only for the history of ethics but even more for the history of political theory and the social sciences. The two most striking features of Smith's work in this area are highlighted. First, his effort at reformulating the `practical science' is a methodologically self-aware attempt at applying the Newtonian method to moral subjects. Secondly, this attempt ends in a stalemate as two distinguished kinds of normative order are introduced: one ultimate order of Reason, ultimately justifiable but inaccessible, and one weaker order of our `natural sentiments', to which we have empirical access, but which is so variable as to lack any ultimate value as a basis for grounding our normative claims. These two parallel conundrums may arguably account for the author's inability to publish during his lifetime both The History of Astronomy and the projected history and theory of law and government. -/- 3. Wheels, dams, and gravitation: the structure of scientific argument in The Wealth of Nations. -/- The third chapter provides the core of the book, dealing with the structure of the argument in WN. I argue that the main presupposition that makes the shift possible from a `natural history' to a `system' approach is the Newtonian contrast of `mathematical' with `physical' explanation; that is, Smith drops any discussion of the "original qualities" of human nature that could account for economic behaviour, while introducing, as `principles' for the system, a set of `hypothetical' statements of `observed' regularities in human behaviour and of `observed' super-individual self-regulating mechanisms. In bringing this presupposition to light, the coexistence of a teleological with a mechanistic approach is clarified; fresh light is shed on the notion of the invisible hand by a comparison of its occurrence in Smith with the occurrence of the same expression (until now overlooked) in the correspondence between Newton and Cotes. Finally, the peculiar semi-prescriptive and semi-descriptive character of political economy are highlighted, and the consistency of Smith's `impure' semi-prescriptive social science, when understood in his own terms, is defended against familiar charges with inconsistency and against even more familiar strained modernizations. -/- 4. Apples, deer, and frivolous trinkets: the construction of the economic. -/- The fourth chapter draws consequences from the third, examining how Smith's achievement in political economy, marking its transition to scientific status, carried a re-description of the phenomena, creating the comparatively independent and unified field of the economic. Smith's achievement is interpreted not as the `discovery' of an autonomous character already possessed by the economy out there, so much as a Gestalt-switch by which our perception of social phenomena is modified making us `see' the partial order of the economy as an isolated system. To sum up, the autonomy of the economic in social reality and the autonomy of the economic in social consciousness are shown to be two sides of one process. -/- 5. Concluding considerations: Political economy and the Enlightenment halved. -/- A few suggestions on the status of economic theory two centuries after The Wealth of Nations in its relationship topractical philosophyare illustrated. (shrink)
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  47.  49
    Globalizing Business Ethics Research and the Ethical Need to Include the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid Countries: Redefining the Global Triad as Business Systems and Institutions[REVIEW]Chong Ju Choi, Sae Won Kim & Jai Beom Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):299 - 307.
    A majority of the countries in the world are still considered "developing," with a per capita income of less than U$1,000. Hahn (2008, Journal of Business (...) Ethics 78, 711721) recently proposed an ambitious business ethics research agenda for integrating the "bottom-of-the-pyramid" countries (Prahalad and Hart, 2002, Strategy and Competition 20, 2214) through sustainable development and corporate citizenship. Hahn's work is among the growing field of research in comparative business ethics including the global business ethics index (Michalos, 2008, Journal of Business Ethics 79(1), 919; Scholtens and Dam, 2008, Journal of Business Ethics 75(3), 273284; Tsalikis and Seaton, 2008, Journal of Business Ethics 75(3), 229238). This article is complementary to Hahn's work and it advocates an urgent need for business ethics researchers to globally integrate the bottom-of-thepyramid countries through a fundamental re-definition of the global economic triad, including the United States, Western Europe, and Japan [Ohmae, 1985, Triad Power: The Coming Shape of Global Competition (New York: Free Press)]. The definition that we propose is based on business systems and institutional perspectives that include the bottom-of-the-pyramid countries. We also propose to broaden the research in business ethics to enable comparisons across business systems indifferent income levels. (shrink)
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  48.  1
    RemakingNature”: The Ecological Turn in Dutch Water Management.Cornelis Disco - 2002 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 27 (2):206-235.
    The ecological turn in water management has usually been interpreted as a political and cultural rather than technical and professional accomplishment. The dynamics of the uptake of (...)
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  49.  19
    Corporate Morality Called in Question: The Case of Cabora Bassa[REVIEW]Georg Schreyögg & Horst Steinmann - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (9):677 - 685.
    This article presents a case study of a big German enterprise (Siemens) facing a large wave of public critique and protest activities. The public was concerned about (...)
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  50.  16
    Legal Preparedness for Public Health Emergencies: TOPOFF 2 and Other Lessons.John A. Heaton, Anne M. Murphy, Susan Allan & Harald Pietz - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):43-44.
    There is a fine balance between civil liberties and protection of the publics health.Legislators, especially those in the western United States, are concerned about selling the (...) Model State Act because of the loss of civil liberties. State constitutions give governors broad powers, such as declaring martial law and giving public health leaders the authority to act. State laws should consider issues such as property rights; taking of businesses and supplies; quarantine and isolation; due process; coordination among states, counties and cities; communication systems; conscription of doctors and nurses; and compensation. When two mock emergency response drills were held in New Mexico, concerns arose regarding opening records associated with dams, national laboratories, waste repositories, and three air force bases. (shrink)
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