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Shai Frogel [6]S. Frogel [1]
  1.  30
    Descartes: Truth and Self-Deception.Shai Frogel - 2016 - Philosophy 91 (1):93-108.
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  2.  16
    Philosophical Argumentation: Logic and Rhetoric. [REVIEW]S. Frogel - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (2):171-188.
  3.  75
    The Soul: An Existentialist Point of View. [REVIEW]Shai Frogel - 2010 - Human Studies 33 (2-3):191-204.
    The debate in relation to the soul suffers nowadays from a great lack of clarity. At least part of this cloudiness stems from a confusion among three different viewpoints that are not always reconcilable or mutually intelligible: the scientific point of view (natural sciences and empirical psychology), the therapeutic point of view (especially psychoanalysis) and the philosophical point of view. The goal of this paper is to blow away a little this cloudiness, and to introduce into the discussion a view (...)
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  4.  28
    Understanding Kant’s Ethics: From the Antinomy of Practical Reason to a Comparison with Kierkegaard’s Spheres of Existence.Shai Frogel - 2017 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Issue Vol 25 No. 1 25 (1):25-42.
    The paper discusses Kant's view concerning the nature of human existence. Its point of departure is Kant's "Antinomy of practical reason", where Kant confronts between the metaphysical and empirical aspects of human existence. Kant's discussion of this issue continues in "Critique of the aesthetical judgment", where he considers the aesthetic experience as a synthesis between these two aspects of human existence. At the end, the paper compares between Kant's view and Kierkegaard's idea of the different spheres of human existence for (...)
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    Who is the Addressee of Philosophical Argumentation?Shai Frogel - 2009 - Argumentation 23 (3):397-408.
    Chaim Perelman invokes the idea of “universal audience” for explaining the nature of philosophical argumentation as rational rhetoric. As opposed to this view, centuries before Perelman, Socrates argues that philosophy should be conducted as a dialogue between concrete individuals with very specific qualities. The paper presents these different views in order to claim that the philosopher addresses neither a universal audience nor a particular other, but mainly and essentially the philosopher herself/himself. This brings to light the problem of self-deception as (...)
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