Order:
Disambiguations
Sally Glen [5]S. Glen [4]
  1.  10
    Educating for Interprofessional Collaboration: Teaching About Values.Sally Glen - 1999 - Nursing Ethics 6 (3):202-213.
    Effective interprofessional collaboration depends upon establishing understanding that respects differences in values and beliefs, and thus differences in response to the multiplicity of patient/client/user needs. To facilitate the latter, this article suggests that health and social care students need a formal knowledge of the meaning of values and the varieties of systems within which values are expressed. Students need especially to understand the genesis of their own professional value system and to recognize the gap that inevitably develops between the values (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  12
    Health Care Education for Dialogue and Dialogic Relationships.Sally Glen - 1999 - Nursing Ethics 6 (1):3-11.
    This article will address the question: how can health care education best take seriously the task of educating for professional practice within a post-traditional, liberal democratic society? In the setting of modernity, the altered personal and professional self has to be explored and constructed as part of a reflective process of connecting personal and professional change: in essence, to develop self-knowledge. A moral life, or ‘working morality’, that evolves out of a process of ongoing dialogue and conversation is required. What (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  14
    Confidentiality:: A Critique of the Traditional View.S. Glen - 1997 - Nursing Ethics 4 (5):403-406.
    ‘Confidentiality’ can become a somewhat embellishing signboard for paternalistic caring. In essence, one needs to distinguish between confidentiality as a respectful attitude to a patient/client, where it becomes credible that the caring professional will not misuse the information he or she obtains about the patient/client, and between confidentiality misused as an instrument of power to keep the patient/client outside of processes in which it might be important or advantageous for him or her to participate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  21
    Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder: An Ethical Concept?Sally Glen - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):98-105.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  10
    The Key to Quality Nursing Care: Towards a Model of Personal and Professional Development.Sally Glen - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (2):95-102.
    Quality of nursing cannot be assessed in terms of performance referenced criteria, but only in terms of the personal qualities displayed in the performance. The key to improvement in practice may be the improvement of emotional and motivational tendencies. In essence, professional development implies personal development. Harré makes a distinction between ‘powers to do’ and ‘powers to be’ (a state of being). The former are the capacities that individuals acquire to perform their tasks and roles. Professional development therefore involves, first, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  6
    Confidentiality: A Critique of the Traditional View.S. Glen - 1997 - Nursing Ethics 4 (5):403-406.
    ‘Confidentiality’ can become a somewhat embellishing signboard for paternalistic caring. In essence, one needs to distinguish between confidentiality as a respectful attitude to a patient/client, where it becomes credible that the caring professional will not misuse the information he or she obtains about the patient/client, and between confidentiality misused as an instrument of power to keep the patient/client outside of processes in which it might be important or advantageous for him or her to participate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    Emotional and Motivational Tendencies: The Key to Quality Nursing Care?S. Glen - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (1):36-42.
    The question of how to improve the quality of nursing care is quite properly perceived to be at the heart of the contemporary nursing debate. Yet it is not clear what quality in health care is; nor is it clear what quality nursing care is. This article will explore why quality issues are such a matter of concern in public and political debate and how different concepts of quality determine different definitions of nursing. The former definitions constitute a developmental continuum (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  12
    The Dark Side of Purity or the Virtues of Double-Mindedness.Sally Glen - 2000 - In Helen Simons & Robin Usher (eds.), Situated Ethics in Educational Research. Routledge. pp. 12--21.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  14
    Educating for Interprofessional Collaboration: Teaching About Values.S. Glen - 1999 - Nursing Ethics 6 (3):202-213.
    Effective interprofessional collaboration depends upon establishing understanding that respects differences in values and beliefs, and thus differences in response to the multiplicity of patient/client/user needs. To facilitate the latter, this article suggests that health and social care students need a formal knowledge of the meaning of values and the varieties of systems within which values are expressed. Students need especially to understand the genesis of their own professional value system and to recognize the gap that inevitably develops between the values (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation