Results for 'S. Grodzinsky Frances'

999 found
Order:
  1.  3
    There’s Something in Your Eye: Ethical Implications of Augmented Visual Field Devices.Marty J. Wolf, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Keith W. Miller - 2016 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 14 (3):214-230.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  18
    Developing Automated Deceptions and the Impact on Trust.Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (1):91-105.
    As software developers design artificial agents , they often have to wrestle with complex issues, issues that have philosophical and ethical importance. This paper addresses two key questions at the intersection of philosophy and technology: What is deception? And when is it permissible for the developer of a computer artifact to be deceptive in the artifact’s development? While exploring these questions from the perspective of a software developer, we examine the relationship of deception and trust. Are developers using deception to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  89
    The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents.Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):115-121.
    In their important paper “Autonomous Agents”, Floridi and Sanders use “levels of abstraction” to argue that computers are or may soon be moral agents. In this paper we use the same levels of abstraction to illuminate differences between human moral agents and computers. In their paper, Floridi and Sanders contributed definitions of autonomy, moral accountability and responsibility, but they have not explored deeply some essential questions that need to be answered by computer scientists who design artificial agents. One such question (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  4.  60
    P2p Networks and the Verizon V. RIAA Case: Implications for Personal Privacy and Intellectual Property. [REVIEW]Frances S. Grodzinsky & Herman T. Tavani - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):243-250.
    In this paper, we examine some ethical implications of a controversial court decision in the United States involving Verizon (an Internet Service Provider or ISP) and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). In particular, we analyze the impacts this decision has for personal privacy and intellectual property. We begin with a brief description of the controversies and rulings in this case. This is followed by a look at some of the challenges that peer-to-peer (P2P) systems, used to share digital (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  86
    Cyberstalking, Personal Privacy, and Moral Responsibility.Herman T. Tavani & Frances S. Grodzinsky - 2002 - Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):123-132.
    This essay examines some ethical aspects of stalkingincidents in cyberspace. Particular attention is focused on the Amy Boyer/Liam Youens case of cyberstalking, which has raised a number of controversial ethical questions. We limit our analysis to three issues involving this particular case. First, we suggest that the privacy of stalking victims is threatened because of the unrestricted access to on-linepersonal information, including on-line public records, currently available to stalkers. Second, we consider issues involving moral responsibility and legal liability for Internet (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  25
    Trust, Betrayal, and Whistle-Blowing.Herman T. Tavani & Frances S. Grodzinsky - 2014 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 44 (3):8-13.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  29
    Online File Sharing: Resolving the Tensions Between Privacy and Property Interests.Frances S. Grodzinsky & Herman T. Tavani - 2008 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 38 (4):28-39.
  8.  34
    Revealing the Commercialized and Compliant Facebook User.Stephen Lilley, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Andra Gumbus - 2012 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 10 (2):82-92.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  26
    Equity of Access: Adaptive Technology.Frances S. Grodzinsky - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (2):221-234.
    In this age of information technology, it is morally imperative that equal access to information via computer systems be afforded to people with disabilities. This paper addresses the problems that computer technology poses for students with disabilities and discusses what is needed to ensure equity of access. particularly in a university environment.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  6
    Free, Source-Code-Available, or Proprietary: An Ethically Charged, Context-Sensitive Choice.Marty J. Wolf, Keith W. Miller & Frances S. Grodzinsky - 2009 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (1):15-26.
  11.  20
    Some Ethical Reflections on Cyberstalking.Frances S. Grodzinsky & Herman T. Tavani - 2002 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 32 (1):22-32.
  12.  55
    Computer Ethics in the Post-September 11 World.Herman T. Tavani, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Richard A. Spinello - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):181-182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  51
    The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents.S. Grodzinsky Frances, W. Miller Keith & J. Wolf Marty - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):112-121.
    In their important paper “Autonomous Agents”, Floridi and Sanders use “levels of abstraction” to argue that computers are or may soon be moral agents. In this paper we use the same levels of abstraction to illuminate differences between human moral agents and computers. In their paper, Floridi and Sanders contributed definitions of autonomy, moral accountability and responsibility, but they have not explored deeply some essential questions that need to be answered by computer scientists who design artificial agents. One such question (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  25
    Editorial: Moral Luck, Social Networking Sites, and Trust on the Web. [REVIEW]Maria C. Bottis, Frances S. Grodzinsky & Herman T. Tavani - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):297-298.
  15.  56
    The Neurology of Syntax: Language Use Without Broca's Area.Yosef Grodzinsky - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):1-21.
    A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that most human linguistic abilities are not localized in this region. In particular, most of syntax (long thought to be there) is not located in Broca's area and its vicinity (operculum, insula, and subjacent white matter). This cerebral region, implicated in Broca's aphasia, does have a role in syntactic processing, but a highly specific one: It is the neural home (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  16.  21
    Privacy in the Cloud: Applying Nissenbaum's Theory of Contextual Integrity.F. S. Grodzinsky & H. T. Tavani - 2011 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 41 (1):38-47.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. Arguing for Frege's Fundamental Principle.Bryan Frances - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (3):341–346.
    Saul Kripke's puzzle about belief demonstrates the lack of soundness of the traditional argument for the Fregean fundamental principle that the sentences 'S believes that a is F' and 'S believes that b is F' can differ in truth value even if a = b. This principle is a crucial premise in the traditional Fregean argument for the existence of semantically relevant senses, individuative elements of beliefs that are sensitive to our varying conceptions of what the beliefs are about. Joseph (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Applying a Social-Relational Model to Explore the Curious Case of hitchBOT.Keith Miller, Marty Wolf & Frances Grodzinsky - 2019 - In Matteo Vincenzo D'Alfonso & Don Berkich (eds.), On the Cognitive, Ethical, and Scientific Dimensions of Artificial Intelligence. Springer Verlag.
    This paper applies social-relational models of moral standing of robots to cases where the encounters between the robot and humans are relatively brief. Our analysis spans the spectrum of non-social robots to fully-social robots. We consider cases where the encounters are between a stranger and the robot and do not include its owner or operator. We conclude that the developers of robots that might be encountered by other people when the owner is not present cannot wash their hands of responsibility. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Plato’s Response to the Third Man Argument in the Paradoxical Exercise of the Parmenides.Bryan Frances - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):47-64.
    An analysis of the Third Man Argument, especially in light of Constance Meinwald's book Plato's Parmenides. I argue that her solution to the TMA fails. Then I present my own theory as to what Plato's solution was.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. The Trace Deletion Hypothesis and the Tree-Pruning Hypothesis: Still Valid Characterizations of Broca's Aphasia.Yosef Grodzinsky - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):55-64.
    I begin with a characterization of neurolinguistic theories, trying to pinpoint some general properties that an account of brain/language relations should have. I then address specific criticisms made in the commentaries regarding the syntactic theory assumed in the target article, properties of the Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH) and the Tree-Pruning Hyothesis (TPH), other experimental results from aphasia, and findings from functional neuroimaging. Despite the criticism, the picture of the limited role of Broca's area remains unchanged.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  67
    The Battle for Broca’s Region.Yosef Grodzinsky & Andrea Santi - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (12):474-480.
  22. The New Leibniz's Law Arguments for Pluralism.Bryan Frances - 2006 - Mind 115 (460):1007-1022.
    For years philosophers argued for the existence of distinct yet materially coincident things by appealing to modal and temporal properties. For instance, the statue was made on Monday and could not survive being flattened; the lump of clay was made months before and can survive flattening. Such arguments have been thoroughly examined. Kit Fine has proposed a new set of arguments using the same template. I offer a critical evaluation of what I take to be his central lines of reasoning.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23.  7
    An fMRI Study Dissociating Distance Measures Computed by Broca's Area in Movement Processing: Clause Boundary Vs. Identity.Andrea Santi, Angela D. Friederici, Michiru Makuuchi & Yosef Grodzinsky - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  51
    The Philosopher's Doom: Unreliable at Truth or Unreliable at Logic.Bryan Frances - forthcoming - In Ted Poston & Kevin McCain (eds.), tba. Brill.
    By considering the epistemology and relations among certain philosophical problems, I argue for a disjunctive thesis: either (1) it is highly probable that there are (i) several (ii) mutually independent philosophical reductios of highly commonsensical propositions that are successful—so several aspects of philosophy have succeeded at refuting common sense—or (2) there is enough hidden semantic structure in even simple sentences of natural language to make philosophers highly unreliable at spotting deductive validity in some of the simplest cases—so we are much (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  21
    Children's Performance on the Sustained Attention to Response Task: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Age-Related Changes.Lewis Frances, Reeve Robert & Johnson Katherine - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  26.  68
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 1: Conceptual and Definitional Issues in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-29.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27. The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:8-.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  60
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue. Part 4: General Conclusion.James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:14-.
    In the conclusion to this multi-part article I first review the discussions carried out around the six essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis – the position taken by Allen Frances on each question, the commentaries on the respective question along with Frances’ responses to the commentaries, and my own view of the multiple discussions. In this review I emphasize that the core question is the first – what is the nature of psychiatric illness – and that in some manner (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 3: Issues of Utility and Alternative Approaches in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]Peter Zachar, Owen Whooley, GScott Waterman, Jerome C. Wakefield, Thomas Szasz, Michael A. Schwartz, Claire Pouncey, Douglas Porter, Harold A. Pincus, Ronald W. Pies, Joseph M. Pierre, Joel Paris, Aaron L. Mishara, Elliott B. Martin, Steven G. LoBello, Warren A. Kinghorn, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Gary Greenberg, Nassir Ghaemi, Michael B. First, Hannah S. Decker, John Chardavoyne, Michael A. Cerullo, Allen Frances & James Phillips - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1).
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  42
    This “Ethical Trap” Is for Roboticists, Not Robots: On the Issue of Artificial Agent Ethical Decision-Making.Keith W. Miller, Marty J. Wolf & Frances Grodzinsky - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):389-401.
    In this paper we address the question of when a researcher is justified in describing his or her artificial agent as demonstrating ethical decision-making. The paper is motivated by the amount of research being done that attempts to imbue artificial agents with expertise in ethical decision-making. It seems clear that computing systems make decisions, in that they make choices between different options; and there is scholarship in philosophy that addresses the distinction between ethical decision-making and general decision-making. Essentially, the qualitative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  23
    Augmented Reality All Around Us.Marty J. Wolf, Frances Grodzinsky & Keith Miller - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):126-131.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  15
    Era of Big Data.Andra Gumbus & Frances Grodzinsky - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):118-125.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  58
    Editorial Introduction – Ethics of New Information Technology.Philip Brey, Luciano Floridi & Frances Grodzinsky - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):109-109.
  34.  18
    The Practitioner From Within: Revisiting the Virtues.Frances Grodzinsky - 1999 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 29 (1):9-15.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  10
    Will “Smarter” Marketing End Social Discrimination? A Critical Review.Frances Grodzinsky, Andra Gumbus & Stephen Lilley - 2013 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 11 (3):132-143.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  5
    Gender Bias in Internet Employment: A Study of Career Advancement Opportunities for Women in the Field of ICT.Andra Gumbus & Frances Grodzinsky - 2004 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 2 (3):133-142.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  54
    Developing Artificial Agents Worthy of Trust: “Would You Buy a Used Car From This Artificial Agent?”. [REVIEW]F. S. Grodzinsky, K. W. Miller & M. J. Wolf - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (1):17-27.
    There is a growing literature on the concept of e-trust and on the feasibility and advisability of “trusting” artificial agents. In this paper we present an object-oriented model for thinking about trust in both face-to-face and digitally mediated environments. We review important recent contributions to this literature regarding e-trust in conjunction with presenting our model. We identify three important types of trust interactions and examine trust from the perspective of a software developer. Too often, the primary focus of research in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  38. Rationally Held ‘P, but I Fully Believe ~P and I Am Not Equivocating’.Bryan Frances - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):309-313.
    One of Moore’s paradoxical sentence types is ‘P, but I believe ~P’. Mooreans have assumed that all tokens of that sentence type are absurd in some way: epistemically, pragmatically, semantically, or assertively. And then they proceed to debate what the absurdity really is. I argue that if one has the appropriate philosophical views, then one can rationally assert tokens of that sentence type, and one can be epistemically reasonable in the corresponding compound belief as well.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Defending Millian Theories.Bryan Frances - 1998 - Mind 107 (428):703-728.
    In this article I offer a three-pronged defense of Millian theories, all of which share the rough idea that all there is to a proper name is its referent, so it has no additional sense. I first give what I believe to be the first correct analysis of Kripke’s puzzle and its anti-Fregean lessons. The main lesson is that the Fregean’s arguments against Millianism and for the existence of semantically relevant senses (that is, individuative elements of propositions or belief contents (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Disquotation and Substitutivity.Bryan Frances - 2000 - Mind 109 (435):519-25.
    Millianism is reasonable; that is, it is reasonable to think that all there is to the semantic value of a proper name is its referent. But Millianism appears to be undermined by the falsehood of Substitutivity, the principle that interchanging coreferential proper names in an intentional context cannot change the truth value of the resulting belief report. Mary might be perfectly rational in assenting to ‘Twain was a great writer’ as well as ‘Clemens was not a great writer’. Her confusion (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Contradictory Belief and Epistemic Closure Principles.Bryan Frances - 1999 - Mind and Language 14 (2):203–226.
    Kripke’s puzzle has puts pressure on the intuitive idea that one can believe that Superman can fly without believing that Clark Kent can fly. If this idea is wrong then many theories of belief and belief ascription are built from faulty data. I argue that part of the proper analysis of Kripke’s puzzle refutes the closure principles that show up in many important arguments in epistemology, e.g., if S is rational and knows that P and that P entails Q, then (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Kripke.Bryan Frances - 2011 - In Barry Lee (ed.), Key Thinkers in the Philosophy of Language. Continuum. pp. 249-267.
    This chapter introduces Kripke's work to advanced undergraduates, mainly focussing on his "A Puzzle About Belief" and "Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  47
    On the Meaning of Free Software.M. J. Wolf, K. W. Miller & F. S. Grodzinsky - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):279-286.
    To many who develop and use free software, the GNU General Public License represents an embodiment of the meaning of free software. In this paper we examine the definition and meaning of free software in the context of three events surrounding the GNU General Public License. We use a case involving the GPU software project to establish the importance of Freedom 0 in the meaning of free software. We analyze version 3 of the GNU General Public License and conclude that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Introduction to the Semantic Paradoxes.Bryan Frances - manuscript
    In this essay (for undergraduates) I introduce three of the famous semantic paradoxes: the Liar, Grelling’s, and the No-No. Collectively, they seem to show that the notion of truth is highly paradoxical, perhaps even contradictory. They seem to show that the concept of truth is a bit akin to the concept of a married bachelor—it just makes no sense at all. But in order to really understand those paradoxes one needs to be very comfortable thinking about how lots of interesting (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  21
    Ethical Issues in Open Source Software.F. S. Grodzinsky, K. Miller & M. J. Wolf - 2003 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 1 (4):193-205.
  46.  13
    The Development of the 'Ethical' ICT Professional: And the Vision of an Ethical on-Line Society: How Far Have We Come and Where Are We Going?F. S. Grodzinsky - 2000 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (1):3-7.
  47.  13
    Private Use as Fair Use: Is It Fair?F. S. Grodzinsky & M. C. Bottis - 2007 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):11-24.
  48.  13
    Moral Responsibility for Computing Artifacts: The Rules and Issues of Trust.F. S. Grodzinsky, K. Miller & M. J. Wolf - 2012 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 42 (2):15-25.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  2
    Influences on and Incentives for Increasing Software Reliability.F. S. Grodzinsky, K. Miller & M. J. Wolf - 2006 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 4 (2):103-113.
  50.  51
    The Failure of Frances’s Live Skepticism.Susan Feldman - 2016 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 6 (4):385-396.
    _ Source: _Page Count 12 In his _Scepticism Comes Alive_, Bryan Frances contends that his “live skepticism” poses a genuine challenge to claims of knowledge in a way that classic “brain-in-a-vat” skepticism does not. This is mistaken. In this paper, I argue that Frances’s live skepticism dies on the horns of a dilemma: if we interpret a key premise in Frances’s skeptical argument template sociologically, then it undercuts itself, showing that there is no reason to accept it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999