Results for 'S. H. Tan'

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  1.  6
    Manzum Bir Menkıbe: Hik'Ye-I Ş'H Hamîd.Bünyamin Tan - 2014 - Journal of Turkish Studies 9 (Volume 9 Issue 3):1395-1395.
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  2. Do No Right, Take No Wrong; Keep What You Have, Get What You Can: Or, the Way of the World Displayd, by S.H. Misodolus.H. S. & Do - 1711
     
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  3. A Warning to Maidens, or, Advice to Girls and Young Women, by H.S.P.S. P. H. & Warning - 1885
     
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  4. Social Ethics, Tr. From [Sittliches Sein Und Sittliches Werden, by H.H.S.].Theobald Ziegler & H. S. H. - 1892
     
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  5.  12
    Goal Attainment in ScienceTechnologySociety (S/T/S) Education and Reality: The Case of British Columbia.Uri Zoller, J. Ebenezer, K. Morely, S. Paras, V. Sandberg, C. West, T. Wolthers & S. H. Tan - 1990 - Science Education 74 (1):19-36.
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  6.  57
    Grammatik der Lateinlsche Sprache, Bearbeitet von Dr H. Schweizer-Sidler, Und Dr Alfred Stjrbee. Erster Theil Halle, 1888. This Little Book (of Only 215 Pages) is a New Recension of Schweizer-Sidler's Latin Elementar Und Formenlehre Published in 1869. The Importance of the Present Volume is That its Writers Have Entirely Recast Their Theory of Latin Morphology in Accordance with the Procedure of the New School of Comparative Philology. It is Much to Be Hoped That Some Competent English or American Scholar Will Either Translate the Book Into English, or Write an Original Work of the Same Character[REVIEW]N. H. - 1889 - The Classical Review 3 (06):275-.
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  7.  9
    An Elucidation of the Adverbial Phrase N Mt N Ś.tAn Elucidation of the Adverbial Phrase N Mt N s.T.H. F. Lutz - 1923 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 43:330.
  8.  61
    Mechanistic Slumber Vs. Statistical Insomnia: The Early Phase of Boltzmanns H-Theorem (1868-1877).Massimiliano Badino - 2011 - European Physical Journal - H 36 (3):353-378.
    An intricate, long, and occasionally heated debate surrounds Boltzmanns H-theorem (1872) and his combinatorial interpretation of the second law (1877). After almost a century of devoted (...) and knowledgeable scholarship, there is still no agreement as to whether Boltzmann changed his view of the second law after Loschmidts 1876 reversibility argument or whether he had already been holding a probabilistic conception for some years at that point. In this paper, I argue that there was no abrupt statistical turn. In the first part, I discuss the development of Boltzmanns research from 1868 to the formulation of the H-theorem. This reconstruction shows that Boltzmann adopted a pluralistic strategy based on the interplay between a kinetic and a combinatorial approach. Moreover, it shows that the extensive use of asymptotic conditions allowed Boltzmann to bracket the problem of exceptions. In the second part I suggest that both Loschmidts challenge and Boltzmanns response to it did not concern the H-theorem. The close relation between the theorem and the reversibility argument is a consequence of later investigations on the subject. (shrink)
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  9.  26
    S.H. Bergman on the Relation Between Philosophy and Religion.Ze'ev Levy - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 24:115-134.
    The relations between philosophy, science and religion preoccupied S.H. Bergman for many years. He wanted to corroborate, by belief, a personal God to whom, and not (...)only about whom, one can speak. This should follow from authentic religious experience, making it independent from philosophy. Furthermore, according to Bergman, religion can do what philosophical reasoning is incapable of doing since he considers belief to be stronger than knowledge. A criticalscrutiny of these assumptions involves some interesting implications concerning toleration, freedom-of-thought and dogmatism. The final conclusion consists in that belief cannot refute philosophical knowledge but can reject it while philosophy can refute belief but cannot reject it. (shrink)
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  10.  79
    Boltzmann's H-Theorem, its Limitations, and the Birth of Statistical Mechanics.Harvey R. Brown & Wayne Myrvold - unknown
    A comparison is made of the traditional Loschmidt and Zermelo objections to Boltzmann's H-theorem, and its simplified variant in the Ehrenfests' 1912 wind-tree model. The (...)
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  11.  12
    S.H. Bergman on the Relation Between Philosophy and Religion.Ze'ev Levy - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 24:115-134.
    The relations between philosophy, science and religion preoccupied S.H. Bergman for many years. He wanted to corroborate, by belief, a personal God to whom, and not (...)only about whom, one can speak. This should follow from authentic religious experience, making it independent from philosophy. Furthermore, according to Bergman, religion can do what philosophical reasoning is incapable of doing since he considers belief to be stronger than knowledge. A criticalscrutiny of these assumptions involves some interesting implications concerning toleration, freedom-of-thought and dogmatism. The final conclusion consists in that belief cannot refute philosophical knowledge but can reject it while philosophy can refute belief but cannot reject it. (shrink)
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  12.  21
    S.H. Bergman on the Relation Between Philosophy and Religion.Ze'ev Levy - 1986 - In Abraham Zvie Bar-On (ed.), Grazer Philosophische Studien. Distributed in the U.S.A. By Humanities Press. pp. 115-134.
    The relations between philosophy, science and religion preoccupied S.H. Bergman for many years. He wanted to corroborate, by belief, a personal God to whom, and not (...)only about whom, one can speak. This should follow from authentic religious experience, making it independent from philosophy. Furthermore, according to Bergman, religion can do what philosophical reasoning is incapable of doing since he considers belief to be stronger than knowledge. A criticalscrutiny of these assumptions involves some interesting implications concerning toleration, freedom-of-thought and dogmatism. The final conclusion consists in that belief cannot refute philosophical knowledge but can reject it while philosophy can refute belief but cannot reject it. (shrink)
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  13.  10
    Voyages and Travels in Greece, the Near East and Adjacent Regions Made Previous to the Year 1801 . By S. H. Weber. Pp. Vii + 208. Princeton: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1953. Price Not Stated[REVIEW]A. M. Woodward & S. H. Weber - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:205-206.
  14.  37
    Heinrich Hertzs Neo-Kantian Philosophy of Science, and its Development by Harald Høffding.Frederik Voetmann Christiansen - 2006 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (1):1-20.
    This article is an investigation of parallel themes in Heinrich Hertz's philosophy science and Kant's theory of schemata, symbols and regulative ideas. It is argued that (...) Hertz's "pictures" bears close similarities to Kantian "schemata", that is, they are rules linking concepts to intuitions and provide them with their meaning. Kant's distinction between symbols and schemata is discussed and related to Hertz's three pictures of mechanics. It is argued that Hertz considered his own picture of mechanics as symbolic in a different way than the force and energy pictures. In the final part of the article it is described how Harald Høffding soon after the publication of Hertz's Principles of Mechanics developed a general theory of analogical reasoning, relying on the ideas of Hertz and Kant. (shrink)
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  15.  77
    Heinrich Hertzs Neo-Kantian Philosophy of Science, and its Development by Harald Høffding.Frederik Voetmann Christiansen - 2006 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (1):1 - 20.
    This article is an investigation of parallel themes in Heinrich Hertz's philosophy science and Kant's theory of schemata, symbols and regulative ideas. It is argued that (...) Hertz's "pictures" bears close similarities to Kantian "schemata", that is, they are rules linking concepts to intuitions and provide them with their meaning. Kant's distinction between symbols and schemata is discussed and related to Hertz's three pictures of mechanics. It is argued that Hertz considered his own picture of mechanics (the "hidden mass" picture) as symbolic in a different way than the force and energy pictures. In the final part of the article it is described how Harald Høffding soon after the publication of Hertz's Principles of Mechanics developed a general theory of analogical reasoning, relying on the ideas of Hertz and Kant. (shrink)
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  16.  44
    H. Richard Niebuhr's Reading of George Herbert Mead: Correcting, Completing, and Looking Ahead.Joshua Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (1):92-115.
    In this essay, I reconstruct H. Richard Niebuhr's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's account of the social constitution of the self. Specifically, I correct Niebuhr's (...)
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  17.  45
    Mitchell H. Miller: Plato's Parmenides: The Conversion of the Soul[REVIEW]J. A. Towey - 1988 - American Journal of Philology 109:600-602.
    A review of Plato's Parmenides, The Conversion of the Soul, by Mitchell H. Miller Junior. The Parmenides is seen as offering readers a chance to appropriate (...)fully by critical and conceptual inquiry what was given in the Republic in the modes of image and analogy. (shrink)
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  18.  70
    Primary Ousia: An Essay on Aristotle's Metaphysics Z and H.S. Marc Cohen & Michael J. Loux - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):397.
    Review of Primary Ousia: An Essay on Aristotle's Metaphysics Z and H, by Michael J. Loux (Cornell University Press: 1991).
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  19.  97
    H.P. Lovecrafts Philosophy of Science Fiction Horror.Greg Littmann - 2018 - Science Fictions Popular Cultures Academics Conference Proceedings:60-75.
    The paper is an examination and critique of the philosophy of science fiction horror of seminal American horror, science fiction and fantasy writer H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937 (...)). Lovecraft never directly offers a philosophy of science fiction horror. However, at different points in his essays and letters, he addresses genres he labelsinterplanetary fiction”, “horror”, “supernatural horror”, andweird fiction”, the last being a broad heading covering both supernatural fiction and science fiction. Taken together, a philosophy of science fiction horror emerges. Central to this philosophy is the juxtaposition of the mysterious, unnatural and alien against a realistic background, in order to produce the emotion that Lovecraft callscosmic fear”. This background must not only be scientifically accurate, but must accurately portray human psychology, particularly when humans are faced with the weird and alien. It will be argued that Lovecrafts prescriptions are overly restrictive and would rule out many legitimate works of science fiction horror art. However, he provides useful insights into the genre. (shrink)
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  20.  24
    John Dewey 18591952: H. S. Thayer.H. S. Thayer - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:69-89.
    It is generally agreed that the most influential philosophers in America are Charles S. Peirce, William James and John Dewey. James's fame came rather suddenly in (...)the latter half of his liferoughly, from 1880 to 1910; it flourished with the appearance of his Principles of Psychology and shortly thereafter with his advocacy of pragmatism and radical empiricism. James was acclaimed in England and Europe as well as in America. Peirce, on the other hand, was almost entirely neglected; his work remained unknown to all but a few philosophers and his chief acknowledgment was as a scientist and logician. His importance began to be recognized and his immense researches and writings studied some twenty-five years after his death. It was otherwise with Dewey. During his long lifetime his ideas not only engaged the reflections and critical discussions of philosophers, he also had a profound and contagious influence on education, the social sciences, aesthetics, and political theory and practice. In this respect his thought has reached a wider audience in America than that of either Peirce or James. In his day lawyers, labour leaders, scientists and several heads of state attested to the vitality of his wisdom. (shrink)
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  21. The Origins and Development of the Triadic Structure of Faith in H. Richard Niebuhr: A Study of the Kantian and Pragmatic Background of Niebuhr's Thought.Joseph S. Pagano - 2005 - Upa.
    Previous studies of H. Richard Niebuhr's intellectual background have fallen into two groups: those that stress the German and especially Kantian sources of Niebuhr's thought, and (...) those that emphasize the American and especially pragmatic sources of his thought. (shrink)
     
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  22. Unity in Aristotle's Metaphysics H 6.Evan Keeling - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (3).
    In this essay I argue that the central problem of Aristotles Metaphysics H (VIII) 6 is the unity of forms and that he solves this problem (...)in just the way he solves the problem of the unity of compositesby hylomorphism. I also discuss the matterform relationship in H 6, arguing that they have a correlative nature as the matter of the form and the form of the matter. (shrink)
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  23.  39
    The Labyrinth; Further Studies in the Relation Between Myth and Ritual in the Ancient World. Edited by S. H. Hooke. Pp. Xiv + 288; 8 Plates, 36 Illustrations in Text. London: S.P.C.K., 1935. Cloth, 12s. 6d[REVIEW]H. J. Rose - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (1):42-42.
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  24. Popper's Measure of Corroboration and P(H|B).Darrell Patrick Rowbottom - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axs029.
    This article shows that Poppers measure of corroboration is inapplicable if, as Popper argued, the logical probability of synthetic universal statements is zero relative to any (...)evidence that we might possess. It goes on to show that Poppers definition of degree of testability, in terms of degree of logical content, suffers from a similar problem. 1 The Corroboration Function and P(h|b) 2 Degrees of Testability and P(h|b). (shrink)
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  25.  14
    Book Review:Leaders of Religious Thought in The Nineteenth Century. S. H. Mellone[REVIEW]H. Barker - 1903 - Ethics 13 (4):528-.
  26.  22
    Letter of Dr. S. H. Hodgson.Shadworth H. Hodgson - 1881 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (3):320 - 322.
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  27.  9
    Leaders of Religious Thought in The Nineteenth Century. S. H. Mellone.H. Barker - 1903 - International Journal of Ethics 13 (4):528-530.
  28.  14
    Psycho-Analysis and Crime. By Major S. H. Foulkes, M.D. Canadian Bar Association.W. J. H. Sprott - 1945 - Philosophy 20 (75):79-.
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  29. Leaders of Religious Thought in the Nineteenth Century, by S. H. Mellone[REVIEW]H. Barker - 1902 - Ethics 13:528.
     
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  30. DISCUSSION-Criticism by S. H. Hodgson.H. Wildon Carr - 1905 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 5:130.
     
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  31.  50
    Victor Dudman's Grammar and Semantics by Jean Curthoys and Victor H. Dudman: Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, Pp. Xi + 158, £58[REVIEW]Charles B. Cross - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):789-791.
    This is a review of Jean Curthoys and Victor H. Dudman, VICTOR DUDMAN'S GRAMMAR AND SEMANTICS (Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).
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  32.  15
    On F. H. BradleysSome Remarks on Punishment”.Thom Brooks - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):223-225,.
    Most philosophers reject what we might call "penal pluralism": the idea that punishment can and should encompass multiple penal goals or principles. This is rejected because (...) it is often held that different penal goals or principles will conflict: the goal of punishing an offender to the degree deserved may differ and even undermine the goal of enabling deterrence or rehabilitation. For this reason, most philosophers argue that we must make a choice, such as choosing between retribution and its alternatives. In "Some Remarks on Punishment," F. H. Bradley re-examines the justification of punishment in light of a critique of Darwinism's importance for ethics. My primary focus is on how Bradley's substantive discussion of punishment only because it is here that this article's arguments have most relevance for us today. (shrink)
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  33.  20
    Toward a Pragmatist Epistemology: Arthur O. Lovejoys and H. S. Jenningss Biophilosophical Responses to Neovitalism, 19091914[REVIEW]Doug Russell - 2015 - Journal of the History of Biology 48 (1):37-66.
    The sustained interdisciplinary debate about neovitalism between two Johns Hopkins University colleagues, philosopher Arthur O. Lovejoy and experimental geneticist H. S. Jennings, in the period 19111914, (...)was the basis for their theoretical reconceptualization of scientific knowledge as contingent and necessarily incomplete in its account of nature. Their response to Hans Drieschs neovitalist concept of entelechy, and his challenge to the continuity between biology and the inorganic sciences, resulted in a historically significant articulation of genetics and philosophy. This study traces the debates shift of problem-focus away from neovitalisms threat to the unity of science – “organic autonomy,” as Lovejoy put itand toward the potential for development of a nonmechanististic, nonrationalist theory of scientific knowledge. The result was a new pragmatist epistemology, based on Lovejoys and Jenningss critiques of the inadequacy of pragmatisms account of scientific knowledge. The first intellectual move, drawing on naturalism and pragmatism, was based on a reinterpretation of science as organized experience. The second, sparked by Henri Bergsons theory of creative evolution, and drawing together elements of Deweys and Jamess pragmatisms, produced a new account of the contingency and necessary incompleteness of scientific knowledge. Prompted by the neovitalistsmix of a priori concepts and, in Drieschs case, and adherence to empiricism, Lovejoys and Jenningss developing pragmatist epistemologies of science explored the interrelation between rationalism and empiricism. (shrink)
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  34. Why Euclids Geometry Brooked No Doubt: J. H. Lambert on Certainty and the Existence of Models.Katherine Dunlop - 2009 - Synthese 167 (1):33-65.
    J. H. Lambert proved important results of what we now think of as non-Euclidean geometries, and gave examples of surfaces satisfying their theorems. I use his (...)philosophical views to explain why he did not think the certainty of Euclidean geometry was threatened by the development of what we regard as alternatives to it. Lambert holds that theories other than Euclid's fall prey to skeptical doubt. So despite their satisfiability, for him these theories are not equal to Euclid's in justification. Contrary to recent interpretations, then, Lambert does not conceive of mathematical justification as semantic. According to Lambert, Euclid overcomes doubt by means of postulates. Euclid's theory thus owes its justification not to the existence of the surfaces that satisfy it, but to the postulates according to which these "models" are constructed. To understand Lambert's view of postulates and the doubt they answer, I examine his criticism of Christian Wolff's views. I argue that Lambert's view reflects insight into traditional mathematical practice and has value as a foil for contemporary, model-theoretic, views of justification. (shrink)
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  35.  28
    Catching Up with Wells: The Political Theory of H. G. Wellss Science Fiction.Emma Planinc - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (5):637-658.
    H. G. Wellss The Rights of Manwhich provided the groundwork for the 1948 UN Declaration of Human Rightshas been re-released with a new Introduction (...)
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  36. On H. M. OliversEstablished Expectations and American Economic Policies”.Govind Persad - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):829-832,.
    In this retrospective for Ethics, I discuss H.M. OliversEstablished Expectations and American Economic Policies.” This article, by a then-modestly-famous economist, has been ignored ( (...)no citations) since its 1940 publication. Yet it bears directly on a normative problem at the intersection of ethics and economics that challenges todays policymakers but has received comparatively little philosophical attention: how should we balance potentially desirable institutional change against the disruption of established expectations? -/- Oliver details how the principle of fulfilling established expectations cuts across political lines. Conservatives, he observes, criticized inflation for disrupting expectations, and demanded the protection of established corporations. New Deal progressives achievedthe safeguarding of the economic positions of certain important sections of the American people” (104) via statutes designed to protect income and homeownership status. And labor leaders lobbied for the preservation of occupational status. Oliver criticizes these demands on two grounds. First, they are noncompossible: they cant simultaneously be fulfilled. Second, they are economically inefficient. He concludes thatin a modern dynamic economy, the preservation of status is not and cannot be a feasible criterion of economic justice” (107). -/- I argue that Oliver accurately recognizes both the wide endorsement and the moral ill-foundedness of fulfilling expectations. However, I criticize Olivers belief in the noncompossibility of expectations. The established expectations of the wealthy, middle-class homeowners and retirees, and current workers can all be maintained, but at the price of constricting the opportunities of new graduates, immigrants, and the poorall groups yet to develop settled expectations. This insight renders the protection of expectations not merely inefficient but also unjust. (shrink)
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  37. Some Thoughts on A. H. LouiesMore Than Life Itself: A Reflection on Formal Systems and Biology”. [REVIEW]Claudio Gutiérrez, Sebastián Jaramillo & Jorge Soto-Andrade - 2011 - Axiomathes 21 (3):439-454.
    We review and discuss A. H. Louies bookMore than Life Itself: A Reflexion on Formal Systems and Biologyfrom an interdisciplinary viewpoint, involving both biology (...)and mathematics, taking into account new developments and related theories. (shrink)
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  38.  31
    H.B.D. Kettlewell's Research 1937-1953: The Influence of E.B. Ford, E.A. Cockayne and P.M. Sheppard.David Wÿss Rudge - 2006 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (3):359 - 387.
    H.B.D. Kettlewell is best known for his pioneering work on the phenomenon of industrial melanism, which began shortly after his appointment in 1951 as a Nuffield (...) Foundation research worker in E.B. Ford's newly formed sub-department of genetics at the University of Oxford. In the years since, a legend has formed around these investigations, one that portrays them as a success story of the 'Oxford School of Ecological Genetics', emphasizes Ford's intellectual contribution, and minimizes reference to assistance provided by others. The following essay reviews the important influence Ford, E.A. Cockayne, and P.M. Sheppard played in Kettlewell's research, leading up to his most famous experiments in 1953. It documents several reasons for doubting that Ford was as intellectually involved in the design of these investigations as he has previously been portrayed. It clarifies Kettlewell's intellectual contribution to the investigations for which he is famous, as well as the pivotal roles Cockayne and Sheppard played in the design, execution and interpretation of these investigations. (shrink)
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  39. Retelling Experiments: H.B.D. Kettlewell's Studies of Industrial Melanism in Peppered Moths[REVIEW]Joel B. Hagen - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):39-54.
    H. B. D. Kettlewell's field experiments on industrial melanism in the peppered moth, Biston betularia, have become the best known demonstration of natural selection in action. (...)I argue that textbook accounts routinely portray this research as an example of controlled experimentation, even though this is historically misleading. I examine how idealized accounts of Kettlewell's research have been used by professional biologists and biology teachers. I also respond to some criticisms of David Rudge to my earlier discussions of this case study, and I question Rudge's claims about the importance of purely observational studies for the eventual acceptance and popularization of Kettlewell's explanation for the evolution of industrial melanism. (shrink)
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  40.  2
    An Investigation of Wang Fuzhi's Study on the Zhuangzi: Focusing on the Zhuangzijie by Tan Mingran.Li Huanyou - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (4):7-11.
    Since being widely rediscovered in the beginning of the last century, Wang Fuzhi 王夫之 has been accepted as one of the most outstanding thinkers in Chinese history. (...)
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  41.  22
    Martins Maximum and Definability in H.Paul B. Larson - 2008 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 156 (1):110-122.
    In [P. Larson, Martins Maximum and the axiom , Ann. Pure App. Logic 106 135149], we modified a coding device from [W.H. Woodin, The Axiom of (...) Determinacy, Forcing Axioms, and the Nonstationary Ideal, Walter de Gruyter & Co, Berlin, 1999] and the consistency proof of Martins Maximum from [M. Foreman, M. Magidor, S. Shelah, Martins Maximum. saturated ideals, and non-regular ultrafilters. Part I, Annal. Math. 127 147] to show that from a supercompact limit of supercompact cardinals one could force Martins Maximum to hold while the axiom fails. Here we modify that argument to prove a stronger fact, that Martins Maximum is consistent with the existence of a wellordering of the reals definable in H without parameters, from the same large cardinal hypothesis. In doing so we give a much simpler proof of the original result. (shrink)
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  42.  19
    The Abject Life of Things: H.C. Andersen's Sentimentality.Anthony Curtis Adler - 2012 - Angelaki 17 (1):115-130.
    This paper attempts a philosophically rigorous interpretation of H.C. Andersens tales. Through a radically conceived sentimentalitythe unmediated juxtaposition of the abjection of things, conceived (...)as a paradoxicaldesire for desirehaving no place in the world, with a cruel, apathetic gazeAndersen challenges the existence of the soul or subjectivity as what, by combining the theoretical gaze with contemplative pleasure, grants coherence to experience. Thus undermining not only Romantic self-reflection, and its suturing of philosophy to criticism, but Platos erotic psychology, Andersen inaugurates a new philosophical literature: a writing for children cultivating an openness. (shrink)
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  43.  47
    Interpreting and Extending G. H. Mead's "Metaphysics" of Selfhood and Agency.Jack Martin - 2007 - Philosophical Psychology 20 (4):441 – 456.
    G. H. Mead developed an alternative "metaphysics" of selfhood and agency that underlies, but is seldom made explicit in discussions of, his social developmental psychology. This is (...)
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  44.  3
    Cosmology in H.D.’S Trilogy: Poetics, Logos and Trace.William Melaney - 2016 - In Patricia Trutty-Coohill & Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (eds.), Analecta Husserliana 119. Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag. pp. 275-289.
    This paper examines the poetics of H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) in terms of a set of phenomenological concerns that have been explored philosophically in the work of (...)Jacques Derrida and Martin Heidegger. Foremost among these concerns is the significance of writing, understood as a counter to verbal discourse and as the basis for a new poetics. The paper centrally compares Derridas opposition between speech and writing to Heideggers criticism of traditional metaphysics while sustaining the importance of phenomenology to both positions. After offering an analysis of the poem, the paper considers the significance of plurality to the sense of human community that the poem would have us assess and affirm. (shrink)
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  45. T.H. Green's Moral and Political Philosophy: A Phenomenological Perspective.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2001 - Palgrave.
    This book offers a new phenomenological interpretation of T.H. Green's (1836-1882) philosophy and political theory. By analyzing his theory of human practice, the moral idea, (...)
     
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  46.  29
    G.H. Mead's Understanding of the Nature of Speech in the Light of Contemporary Research.Timothy J. Gallagher - 2012 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (1):40-62.
    The following analysis demonstrates that G.H. Mead's understanding of human speech is remarkably consistent with today's interdisciplinary field that studies speech as a natural behavior (...)
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  47.  40
    All Causality Occurs in a Present: G.H. Meads Proposal to Process Philosophy.Edgar A. Towne - 2010 - Process Studies 39 (1):87-105.
    G.H. Mead and A.N. Whitehead agree that all causation occurs in a present, that the self is social, and that philosophical description of the new physics (...) of relativity and quantum mechanics is a complicated task. I explore this complexity in relation to the knowledge of events unable to be observed here and now, especially past historical events. The integration of the two philosophersviews is shown in reference to Whiteheads criteria of respect for facts and coherence. By reference to the work of Palmyre Oomen I show the inconsistency of Whiteheads treatment of the prehensibility of Gods consequent nature with his claim thatGod is not an exception to the metaphysical principles. The integration of Meads and Whiteheads views permits plausible talk about past, present, and futureconsisent with our scientific knowledge. (shrink)
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  48.  25
    Reconciling Faith and Reason: T. H. Greens Theory of Human Agency.Adrian Paylor - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 79 (1-2):156-177.
    The Victorian age was a period in which Christian Orthodoxy was undermined by new and emerging forms of reasoned inquiry. The commonly-held view amongst historians is (...)that the intellectual life in the era was composed of two hostile camps; those who defended Christian Orthodoxy and those who championed the new sciences. The received view is that, when faced by the new fields of reasoned inquiry, Christianitys prominence within British intellectual life and discourse went into terminal decline. The intention of this article is to demonstrate that there was a middle ground between the two camps. In particular, this article aims to demonstrate that attempts were made to reconcile Christianity with the findings of the emerging forms of reasoned inquiry. This will be achieved through providing an examination of T. H. Greens theory of Human Agency. Green he was one of the most prominent philosophers of the Victorian age. Through his theory of human agency, Green consciously engaged in the debate that existed between theistic Christianity and the emerging forms of reason inquiry of the time. (shrink)
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  49.  36
    The Politics of Communities A Review of H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr.'s The Foundations of Bioethics.Christine Overall - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):179-185.
    This review essay examines H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.'s The Foundations of Bioethics, a contemporary nonfeminist text in mainstream biomedical ethics. It focuses upon a central concept, (...)Engelhardt 's idea of the moral community and argues that the most serious problem in the book is its failure to take account of the political and social structures of moral communities, structures which deeply affect issues in biomedical ethics. (shrink)
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  50. T.H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom: From Metaphysics to Political Theory (Review).James W. Allard - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):538-539.
    Although T. H. Green is primarily remembered today as a moral and political philosopher, many of his philosophical concerns owe their origins to the Victorian crisis of (...)
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