Results for 'S. Ii'

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  1.  7
    The Cambridge Ancient History. Edited by J. B. Bury, S. A. Cook and F. E. Adcock. Vol. II. Pp. 749, 15 Plates. Cambridge University Press, 1924. 35s. Net[REVIEW]C. S. - 1924 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 44 (2):309-310.
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  2.  5
    R. A. BILLINGTON with the Collaboration of C. P. HILL, A. J. JOHNSTONE II, and C. F. MULLETT, "The Historian's Contribution to Anglo-American Misunderstanding. Report of a Committee on National Bias in Anglo-American History Textbooks". [REVIEW]T. H. von Laue, E. H. Dance, R. A. Billington, C. P. Hill, A. J. Johnstone Ii, C. L. Mowat & C. F. Mullett - 1967 - History and Theory 6 (2):219.
  3. Tradition(s) Ii: Hermeneutics, Ethics, and the Dispensation of the Good.Stephen H. Watson - 2001 - Indiana University Press.
    Tradition II Hermeneutics, Ethics, and the Dispensation of the Good Stephen H. Watson Examines concepts of tradition in 20th-century Continental philosophy. In Tradition II, Stephen H. (...)Watson engages post-Kantian Continental philosophy in his continuing investigation into the concept of tradition which he began in his work, Tradition. According to Watson, the problem of tradition became explicit in 20th-century philosophy, and is especially apparent in the work of Heidegger, Gadamer, Husserl, Benjamin, Adorno, Levinas, Kristeva, and Derrida, among others. By formulating a series of dialogues between these philosophers and their predecessors, Watson articulates the issues and concerns surrounding tradition and traditionality. Taking on topics such as the hermeneutics of the self, the rationality of tradition, the pluralistic nature of historical interpretation, and the question of the "other," Watson emphasizes the importance of classical accounts of ethical and political discourse for contemporary philosophy and todays multicultural world. Watson extends his analysis of tradition to include the problems of meaning and narrative and the nature of the self. He also considers the meaning of the Good and how Good is dispensed in the world. By questioning past philosophical narratives and their influence on modern and postmodern philosophy, Watson brings fresh perspective to the complex meanings of tradition for a pluralistic world. Stephen H. Watson is Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Philosophy Department at the University of Notre Dame. He is author of Extensions: Essays on Interpretation, Rationality, and the Closure of Modernism and Tradition: Refiguring Community, Remembrance, and Virtue in Classical German Thought. Studies in Continental ThoughtJohn Sallis, general editor June 2001 320 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4, index cloth 0-253-33900-6 $35.00 s / £26.50. (shrink)
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  4.  19
    A Link Between Alzheimer's and Type II Diabetes Mellitus? Ca+2 -Mediated Signal Control and Protein Localization.Yuko Tsutsui & Franklin A. Hays - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (6):1700219.
  5.  91
    Edmund Husserl's Contribution to Phenomenology of the Body in Ideas II.Elizabeth A. Behnke - 2010 - In Thomas Nenon & Lester Embree (eds.), Issues in Husserl's II (Contributions to Phenomenology). pp. 135-160.
    Like the history of much of Husserls work, the history of his contribution to a phenomenology of the body is in part a history of understandable (...)misunderstandings and subsequent reevaluations concerning the scope and significance of his achievements. To a certain extent, this is due not so much to what he actually said on this topic, but to the circumstances under which he said or wrote ituniversity lecture course? unpublished book draft? published work? research manuscript? conversation noted down by others?—and to the sequence and manner in which this work gradually became available to the larger phenomenological community. For example, it was widely held at one time, primarily on the basis of Ideas I (see, e.g., III: §§ 39, 5354),2 that Husserl dealt only with a disembodied and desituated consciousness, and that it was only with the advent of existential phenomenology that the body truly became an important phenomenological theme. However, we now know that Merleau-Ponty, for example, drew upon Husserls manuscripts for many of the descriptions and insights developed in the extensive and influential discussions of the body in Phenomenology of Perception (see Van Breda 1962/1992). Moreover, though it is now more readily acknowledged that Husserl did indeed take the body into account, some still assume or imply that he did so only toward the end of his life. Yet a closer examination of material published to date reveals that Husserl was concerned with bodilihood in texts from many different periods.3 A fuller appreciation of the range and richness of Husserls work in phenomenology of the body is nevertheless emerging only slowly.4 It is the purpose of this essay to help establish a basis for such appreciation by sorting out and summarizing certain key contributions to a phenomenology of the body in Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy, Second Book, and by indicating the continuing relevance of Husserls achievements in this text to current issues. (shrink)
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  6.  12
    Advances Regarding Evaluation and Action in Husserl's Ideas II.Lester Embree - 2010 - In Thomas Nenon & Lester Embree (eds.), Issues in Husserl's II (Contributions to Phenomenology). pp. 173--198.
    He who sees everywhere only nature, nature in the sense of, and, as it were, through the eyes of, natural science, is precisely blind to the spiritual (...)
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  7. UnthinkableUnknowable: On Charlotte DelbosII Faut Donner À Voir’.Paul Prescott - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):457-468.
    This paper is an attempt to articulate and defend a new imperative, Auschwitz survivor Charlotte Delbos Il faut donner à voir: “They must be made to (...)see.” Assuming thetheyin Delbos imperative isusgives rise to three questions: (1) what must we see? (2) can we see it? and (3) why is it that we must? I maintain that what we must see is the reality of evil; that we are by and large unwilling, and often unable, to see the reality of evil; and that if there is to be comprehension ofto say nothing of justice forthe survivors of evil, we nonetheless must. (shrink)
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  8. Why Did Einstein's Programme Supersede Lorentz's? (II).Elie Zahar - 1973 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (3):223-262.
  9.  25
    Los estoicos y Platón, en la obra de los apologetas del s.II. Helenismo y cristianismo.Juan Carlos García-Borrón - 1964 - Convivium: revista de filosofía 17:49-62.
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  10.  10
    On the Text and Interpretation of Horace, S. II. 1. 85 F.D. A. Slater - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (05):172-174.
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  11.  6
    The Scientific Work of William Brownrigg, M.D., F.R.S. —II.J. Russell-Wood - 1951 - Annals of Science 7 (1):77-94.
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  12.  3
    Mehmed's II. Heirat MIT Sitt-Chatun.Franz Babinger - 1950 - Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 29 (2):217-235.
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  13.  1
    MashhadAlī, ein Bau Zengi's II a. H. 589. Mit 5 Abbildungen im Text und 5 Tafeln in Lichtdruck.Ernst Herzfeld - 1914 - Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 5 (4):358-369.
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  14. Schopenhauer liest die Septuaginta. Unveroffentlichte Randschriften Schopenhauers. II (S. lecteur de la Septante. Gloses marginales inédites de S., II). [REVIEW]E. Hildebrand - 1987 - Schopenhauer Jahrbuch 68:189-194.
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  15. Uneasiness and Passions in Leibniz's Nouveaux Essais II, Xx.Markku Roinila - 2011 - In Breger Herbert, Herbst Jürgen & Erdner Sven (eds.), Natur und Subjekt. IX. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress Vorträge 3. Teil. Leibniz Geschellschaft.
    Chapter 20 of book II of John Lockes An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, titledOf Modes of Pleasure and Painis the most extensive discussion of (...)emotions available in Lockes corpus. Likewise, Nouveaux essais sur lentedement humain, II, xx, together with the following chapter xxi remains the chief source of Leibnizs views of emotions. They offer a very interesting and captivating discussion of moral philosophy and good life. The chapter provides also a great platform to study Leibnizs argumentative techniques and the differences between the philosophers in general. Locke strives to explain the emotions with a single, unifying notion of uneasiness while Leibnizs view of the mind is much more complex and he finds more unique ways of explaining different emotions. My paper focuses on Leibnizs critique of Lockean uneasiness as an explanans for emotions. He views uneasiness as a unavoidable part of all our mental states and therefore it is not sufficient to explain passions or moral wrong-doing of men. I will discuss such passions as love, joy, sorrow, hope, fear, despair, anger, envy and shame and consider Lockes possible response to Leibnizs critique. (shrink)
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  16.  4
    Bergmanns Rule, Adaptation, and Thermoregulation in Arctic Animals: Conflicting Perspectives From Physiology, Evolutionary Biology, and Physical Anthropology After World War II.Joel B. Hagen - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (2):235-265.
    Bergmanns rule and Allens rule played important roles in mid-twentieth century discussions of adaptation, variation, and geographical distribution. Although inherited from the nineteenth-century natural (...)history tradition these rules gained significance during the consolidation of the modern synthesis as evolutionary theorists focused attention on populations as units of evolution. For systematists, the rules provided a compelling rationale for identifying geographical races or subspecies, a function that was also picked up by some physical anthropologists. More generally, the rules provided strong evidence for adaptation by natural selection. Supporters of the rules tacitly, or often explicitly, assumed that the clines described by the rules reflected adaptations for thermoregulation. This assumption was challenged by the physiologists Laurence Irving and Per Scholander based on their arctic research conducted after World War II. Their critique spurred a controversy played out in a series of articles in Evolution, in Ernst Mayrs Animal Species and Evolution, and in the writings of other prominent evolutionary biologists and physical anthropologists. Considering this episode highlights the complexity and ambiguity of important biological concepts such as adaptation, homeostasis, and self-regulation. It also demonstrates how different disciplinary orientations and styles of scientific research influenced evolutionary explanations, and the consequent difficulties of constructing a truly synthetic evolutionary biology in the decades immediately following World War II. (shrink)
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  17.  96
    Russell, His Paradoxes, and Cantor's Theorem: Part II.Kevin C. Klement - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):29-41.
    Sequel to Part I. In these articles, I describe Cantors power-class theorem, as well as a number of logical and philosophical paradoxes that stem from it (...), many of which were discovered or considered (implicitly or explicitly) in Bertrand Russells work. These include Russells paradox of the class of all classes not members of themselves, as well as others involving properties, propositions, descriptive senses, class-intensions and equivalence classes of coextensional properties. Part II addresses Russells own various attempts to solve these paradoxes, including strategies that he considered and rejected (limitation of size, the zigzag theory, etc.), as well as his own final views whereupon many purported entities that, if reified, lead to these contradictions, must not be genuine entities, butlogical fictionsorlogical constructionsinstead. (shrink)
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  18.  15
    On ReinstatingPart IandPart IIto Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations.Hugh A. Knott - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 40 (4):329-349.
    The EditorsPreface to the fourth edition of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations is disparaging of the earlier editorial efforts of G. E. M. Anscombe and Rush Rhees (...)and in particular of their inclusion and titling of the material inPart II”. I argue, on both historical and philosophical grounds, that the Editors have failed to refute the editorial decisions of Rhees and Anscombea failure born both of a neglect of the historical circumstances and Wittgenstein's own expressed hopes and intentions for his writings, and of a myopic understanding of his philosophy. Wittgenstein's legacy has not been well served by their interventions, which should be undone in future editions. (shrink)
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  19.  84
    The Concept of Fetishism in Marx's Thought : Part I of II.Enrique Dussel - 2003 - Radical Philosophy Review 6 (1):1-28.
    In this essay, Enrique Dussel provides a textualrereadingof Karl Marxs theory of fetishism according to his scattered but significantcomments on religion as they extend (...)throughout the whole of his work. In Part I, “The Place of the Subject of Religion in the Whole Work of Marx,” Dussel demonstrates Marxs differentiation between a critique of the essence of religion and its manifestations, arguing that there is a space in Marx for a anti-fetishized liberatory religion. In Part II, “Toward a Theory of Fetishism in General,” he provides a methodological account of such a religion, as well as a panorama of the content of this essence of religion. These accounts provide the basis for more clearly identifying both religious fetishism and the fetishist character of capital. (shrink)
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  20.  72
    Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22194a12this Paper Was Prepared as the Basis of a Presentation at a Conference EntitledWriting and Rewriting the History of Science, 19002000,” Les treilLes, France, September, 2003, Organized by Karine Chemla and Roshdi Rashed. I Have Compared Aristotle's and Ptolemy's Views of the Relationship Between Astronomy and Physics in a Paper CalledAstrologogeômetria and Astrophysikê in Aristotle and Ptolemy,” Presented at a Conference EntitledPhysics and Mathematics in Antiquity,” Leiden, the Netherlands, June, 2004, Organized by Keimpe Algra and Frans de Haas. For a Discussion of Hellenistic Views of This Relationship See Ian Mueller, “Remarks on Physics and Mathematical Astronomy and Optics in Epicurus, Sextus Empiricus, and Some Stoics,” in Philippa Lang , Re-Inventions: Essays on Hellenistic and Early Roman Science, Apeiron 37, 4 : 5787. I Would Like to Thank Two Anonymous Readers of This Essay for Meticulous Corrections and Th[REVIEW]Ian Mueller - 2006 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course (...)
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  21.  70
    The Concept of Fetishism in Marxs Thought , Part II of II.Enrique Dussel - 2003 - Radical Philosophy Review 6 (2):93-129.
    In this essay, Enrique Dussel provides a textualrereadingof Karl Marxs theory of fetishism according to his scattered but significant comments on religion as they (...)extend throughout the whole of his work. In Part I, “The Place of the Subject of Religion in the Whole Work of Marx,” Dussel demonstrates Marxs differentiation between a critique of the essence of religion and its manifestations, arguing that there is a space in Marx for a anti-fetishized liberatory religion. In Part II, “Toward a Theory of Fetishism in General,” he provides a methodological account of such a religion, as well as a panorama of the content of this essence of religion. These accounts provide the basis for more clearly identifying both religious fetishism and the fetishist character of capital. (shrink)
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  22.  36
    Euthanasia and John Paul II'sSilent Language of Profound Sharing of Affection:” Why Christians Should Care About Peter Singer.Derek Jeffreys - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):359-378.
    Peter Singer's recent appointment to Princeton University created considerable controversy, most of it focused on his proposal for active euthanasia of disabled infants. Singer articulates utilitarian (...)ideas that often appear in public discussions of euthanasia. Drawing on Pope John Paul II's work on ethics and suffering, I argue that Singer's utilitarian theory of value is impoverished. After introducing the Pope's ethic based on the imago dei, I discuss love as self-gift. I show how this concept supports a theory of value in which spiritual goods are preeminent over material goods. I then describe how suffering reveals spiritual goods, discussing how participation in Christ's suffering can alter our perception of value. I also consider how communal responses to suffering provide opportunities for self-giving. Third, I consider Singer's proposal for killing infants with hemophilia, arguing that it arbitrarily ignores spiritual goods. I then discuss proposals to kill anencephalic infants, discussing how parental response to their suffering can demonstrate an extraordinary love in seemingly hopeless circumstances. I conclude by calling for a more sustained social response to euthanasia initiatives. (shrink)
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  23.  29
    From Nature to Spirit: Husserl's Phenomenology of the Person in Ideen II.Timothy Burns - 2014 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):4-22.
    In this article, I explicate Husserls phenomenology of the person as found in Ideen II by examining the most important aspects of persons in this work. (...)In the first section, I explicate the concept of the surrounding world (Umwelt) with special attention to the difference between the different attitudes (Einstellungen) that help determine the sense of constituted objects of experience. In the second section, I investigate Husserls description of the person as a founded, higher order, spiritual (geistig) objectivity. I consider this description of the person by examining the symmetry between the organization of Ideen II as a whole and the order of the constitution of the person. In the final section, I look at the relationship between the constitution of the person and the spiritual (geistig) world. (shrink)
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  24. The Soul's Instrument for Touching in Aristotle, on the Soul II 11, 422b34423a21.Abraham P. Bos - 2010 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (1):89-102.
    From ancient times Aristotle, On the Soul II 11, 422b34ff. on the perception of touch has remained incomprehensible. We can only start to understand the text when (...)
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  25.  41
    Gabriel Cercel: Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hermeneutische Entwürfe. Vorträge und AufsätzePaul Marinescu: Pascal Michon, Poétique d'une anti-anthropologie: l'herméneutique de GadamerPaul Marinescu: Robert J. Dostal (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to GadamerAndrei Timotin: Denis Seron, Le problème de la métaphysique. Recherches sur l'interprétation heideggerienne de Platon et d'AristoteDelia Popa: Henry Maldiney, Ouvrir le rien. L'art nuCristian Ciocan: Dominique Janicaud, Heidegger en France, I. Récit; II. EntretiensVictor Popescu: Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Fenomenologia percepţieiRadu M. Oancea: Trish Glazebrook, Heidegger's Philosophy of SciencePaul Balogh: Richard Wolin, Heidegger's Children. Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith, Hans Jonas and Herbert MarcuseBogdan Mincă: Ivo De Gennaro, Logos - Heidegger liest HeraklitRoxana Albu: O. K. Wiegand, R. J. Dostal, L. Embree, J. Kockelmans and J. N. Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology on Kant, German Idealism, Hermeneutics and LogicAnca Dumitru: James Faulconer an[REVIEW]Gabriel Cercel, Paul Marinescu, Andrei Timotin, Delia Popa, Cristian Ciocan, Victor Popescu, Radu M. Oancea, Paul Balogh, Bogdan Mincă, Roxana Albu & Anca Dumitru - 2002 - Studia Phaenomenologica 2 (1):261-313.
    Hans-Georg GADAMER, Hermeneutische Entwürfe. Vorträge und Aufsätze ; Pascal MICHON, Poétique dune anti-anthropologie: lherméneutique deGadamer ; Robert J. DOSTAL, The Cambridge Companion to Gadamer ; Denis (...)SERON, Le problème de la métaphysique. Recherches sur linterprétation heideggerienne de Platon et dAristote ; Henry MALDINEY, Ouvrir le rien. Lart nu ; Dominique JANICAUD, Heidegger en France, I. Récit; II. Entretiens ; Maurice MERLEAU-PONTY, Fenomenologia percepţiei ; Trish GLAZEBROOK, Heideggers Philosophy of Science ; Richard WOLIN, Heideggers Children. Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith, Hans Jonas and Herbert Marcuse ; Ivo DEGENNARO, LogosHeidegger liest Heraklit ; O. K. WIEGAND, R. J. DOSTAL, L. EMBREE, J. KOCKELMANS and J. N. MOHANTY, Phenomenology on Kant, German Idealism, Hermeneutics and Logic ; James FAULCONER and Mark WRATHALL, Appropriating Heidegger. (shrink)
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  26.  41
    Hegels Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint.Ardis B. Collins - 1985 - The Owl of Minerva 16 (2):215-221.
    Hegels Phenomenology, Part II, which begins with the section on spirit, completes a study begun in an earlier publication, Hegels Phenomenology, Part I. The study is (...) divided into analysis and commentary, and these run parallel to each other. The commentary takes the form of notes separated from the main text. These notes identify historical, literary, religious, and philosophical influences, compare the issues Hegel is dealing with to similar issues identified by other philosophers, give cross references to other parts of the Phenomenology, and suggest certain ramifications and broader applications of the experiences Hegel is describing. Kainzs commentary is rich with suggestive ideas for filling in the historical context and appreciating the perennial significance of the Phenomenology. But it is not a continuous, coherent response to Hegels text. For this we must look to the analysis part of the study. (shrink)
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  27.  28
    Narratives of Totalitarianism: Nazism's Anti-Semitic Propaganda During World War II and the Holocaust.Jeffrey Herf - 2006 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (135):32-60.
    In recent decades, historians have probed the kinds of narratives that they tell in constructing the past. In the process, we have devoted too little attention to (...)
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  28. Application of the TETRAD II Program to the Study of Student Retention in U.S. Colleges.Clark Glymour - unknown
    We applied TETRAD II, a causal discovery program developed in Carnegie Mellon Universitys Department of Philosophy, to a database containing information on 204 U.S. colleges, collected (...) by the US News and World Report magazine for the purpose of college ranking. Our analysis focuses on possible causes of low freshmen retention in U.S. colleges. TETRAD II finds a set of causal structures that are compatible with the data. (shrink)
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  29.  23
    Marc Bloch, Strange Defeat, the Historian's Craft and World War II: Writing and Teaching Contemporary History.Neil Morpeth - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (3):179-195.
    The roles of small and great books, and passionate yet well-considered writings in the general education of acollegeoruniversitytrained teacher are questions which (...)should be turned back upon the historian as teacher and writer. Where resides the historian's classroom? Who are the students and how do teachers come to be? What subject matter should be used to prod and provoke an often dormant humanity awake? Professor Marc Bloch's work, his passion for history's rôles and its voices from the past speaking to the present, had a Renaissance in the cauldron of World War II. Bloch's commitment to teaching and writing history, teaching about the forceful, or surprising and shocking, “presencesof history's supposed past-tense experiences, remains seminal to the historian's craft. Bloch's own voice from the past was forged in an intensity of present-time experience. Reflection was searing experience. Memory wasnowand remembrance was an accident of preservation for futures then unknown. These futures need to know of the experiences of former, fragile, personal and generational memories if the very same futures were to be lived more surely and securely. Marc Bloch's The Historian's Craft, remains a vindication of the human-centred, purposive roles of history in a general education. Moreover, this general education can now be said to cover the broad sweep ofsecondary schoolingexperiences. This sweep of schooling and post-schooling experiences is beginning, however tentatively and problematically, to extend itself into worlds of work, the futures of work and the academic futures or courses of higher education: the arena of tertiary and university education. In a not dissimilar fashion but in an even more intense spirit, Bloch's work, Létrange défaite, examines the explosion and implosion of France and, in effect, Western Europe in the years, months and days leading up to the German offensive in the West of 10 May 1940. Bloch recognized that education and the failures to harness intellect, true intellectual freedom and innovative teaching weighed heavily upon the disastrous course of events in 1940. Professor Bloch's texts can serve two complementary purposes. First, his works, Strange Defeat and The Historian's Craft remain as significant, contemporary records of personal thoughts, argumentative methodologies, and recollections of world-shattering events. They constitute, quite literally, an historian's craft in action. Second, Bloch's texts can serve an equally valuable role where the writer seeks to take his reader through and beyond the immediate historical question, methodology or series of unravelling events into an intellectual duel which stands upon the historian's engagement with worlds, past and present. Questions and actions, makings and doings matter in this world. Understanding is not only a prime responsibility of the historian; it is a duty which might well prove dangerous. Given the above observations, this essay will seek to emphasize that world history and the teaching of broad histories of humanity recognizes few, if any, borders which seek to block or hold at bay the presentation of thepassportknown as understanding. Teaching history is much more than teaching civics or recognizing civilizational variety and its barbarous opposites. Teaching history is an act, however imperfect, of recognizing ourselves in time. My brotherschoolmasters”—when it came to the point, you did, for the most part, put up a magnificent fight. It was your goodwill which managed to create in many a sleepy secondary school, in many universitiesprisoners of the worse routines the only form of education of which, perhaps, we can feel genuinely proud. I only hope that a day will come, and come soon, a day of glory and of happiness for France, when, liberated from the enemy, and freer than ever in our intellectual life, we may meet again for the mutual discussion of ideas. And when that happens, do you not think that, having learned from an experience so dearly purchased, you will find much to alter in the things you were teaching only a few years back? Strange Defeat, 142).1 What was at stake was a geological upheaval of thought2. (shrink)
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  30.  24
    The Five Senses in Willem II van Haecht's Cabinet of Cornelis van Der Geest.Charles M. Peterson - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 20 (1):103-121.
    Willem II van Haecht?s panel of the Cabinet of Cornelis van der Geest (1628), introduces the viewer to the theme of the Five Senses by including (...)five prominently displayed paintings, each corresponding to one of the senses, in the foreground. The paper offers a new reading of the panel, suggesting that this image may be read as an allegory of the Five Senses, proposing this theme as a key to the rhetorical performance the collector, van der Geest, is shown undertaking, and connecting the senses to the picture?s punning motto: Vive l?Esprit. (shrink)
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  31.  33
    John Paul II's Interpretation of 1 Corinthians 9:24-27: A Paradigm for a Christian Ethic of Sport.J. White - 2012 - Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (1):73-88.
    John Paul II proposes that 1 Cor. 9:24-27 includes sport among the human values and offers a paradigm to recognisethe fundamental validity of sport, considering (...) it not just as a term of comparison to illustrate higher ethical and aesthetic ideal, but also in its intrinsic reality as a factor in the formation of man as a part of his culture and his civilization’. In this paper, I intend to follow John Paul IIs interpretation and moral reasoning in order to demonstrate how 1 Cor. 9:24-27 can be used in Christian ethics as a paradigm for theological reflection on sport. (shrink)
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  32.  4
    Heschels Disciples on Jewish-Christian Dialogue and Pope John Paul II.Shoshana Ronen - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):201-211.
    The article presents the conception of interreligious dialogue developed by Abraham Joshua Heschel in his legendary text No Religion Is an Island. Then, it illustrates the approach (...)
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  33.  9
    Hegels Phenomenology, Part II: The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint[REVIEW]Ardis B. Collins - 1985 - The Owl of Minerva 16 (2):215-221.
    Hegels Phenomenology, Part II, which begins with the section on spirit, completes a study begun in an earlier publication, Hegels Phenomenology, Part I. The study is (...) divided into analysis and commentary, and these run parallel to each other. The commentary takes the form of notes separated from the main text. These notes identify historical, literary, religious, and philosophical influences, compare the issues Hegel is dealing with to similar issues identified by other philosophers, give cross references to other parts of the Phenomenology, and suggest certain ramifications and broader applications of the experiences Hegel is describing. Kainzs commentary is rich with suggestive ideas for filling in the historical context and appreciating the perennial significance of the Phenomenology. But it is not a continuous, coherent response to Hegels text. For this we must look to the analysis part of the study. (shrink)
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  34.  9
    Pope John Paul II's Social Thought: Beyond Politics Or Ideology.Jean Bethke Elshtain - 2000 - Catholic Social Science Review 5:45-53.
    Jolm Paul II has consistently addressed a set of core themes in his writing and preaching: a dialectic oflaw and grace; the irreducible dignity of the humanperson; (...)
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  35.  24
    Grenfell and Hunt's Tebtunis Papyri . - The Tebtunis Papyri, Part II. Edited by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt, with the Assistance of E. J. Godspeed. London: Henry Frowde, 1907. Pp. Xv + 485. Two Facsimiles and Map. £2 5s. Net[REVIEW]James Hope Moulton - 1908 - Classical Quarterly 2 (02):137-.
    The Tebtunis Papyri, Part II. Edited by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt, with the assistance of E. J. Godspeed. London: Henry Frowde, 1907. Pp. xv (...)
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  36.  13
    Notes on the Metrical Semantics of Russian, French and German Imitations of Janus Secunduss Basium II.Igor Pilshchikov - 2012 - Sign Systems Studies 40 (1/2):155-175.
    This article links Konstantin Batiushkovs poem Elysium (1810) to the tradition of poetic imitations of Janus Secunduss Basium II. A French equivalent for this poems (...)
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  37.  16
    John Paul II's Call for a Renewed Theology of Being: Just What Did He Mean, and How Can We Respond?L. P. Hemming - 2008 - Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):194-218.
    In this article I explore the contemporary relationship of theology to philosophy through the call for a `renewed philosophy of being' by Pope John Paul II. I (...)
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  38.  7
    Notes on the Metrical Semantics of Russian, French and German Imitations of Janus Secunduss Basium II.Igor Pilshchikov - 2012 - Sign Systems Studies 40 (1/2):155-175.
    This article links Konstantin Batiushkovs poem Elysium to the tradition of poetic imitations of Janus Secunduss Basium II. A French equivalent for this poems pythiambic (...)
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  39.  8
    Boundary Fluidity and Ideology: A Comparison of Japan's Pre-World War II and Present Regionalisms.Lydia N. Yu Jose - 2012 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 13 (1):105-129.
    There is a question that has not been raised in the literature on Japan's regionalism: Why does it have a strong tendency toward making the boundary (...)of the proposed East Asian community fluid? By looking back beyond the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere of the 1940s, a method hitherto untried, the paper shows that this Japanese propensity was also present in the first half of the twentieth century, especially in the 1920s and 1930s. Moreover, both then and now, Japan did not and does not have a firm adherence to an ideology. These are two similarities between the pre-World War II period and the present (from the 1960s). On the other hand, Japan's present international situation is very different from its pre-World War II position. The paper uses the logic of the comparative method, which states that in two cases that are different in most aspects but the same in some, one or some of the similarities may explain the other similarity or similarities. It concludes that in both periods, the lack of a firm commitment to an ideology explains Japan's prejudice toward boundary fluidity. This explanation has the potential to contribute to a more comprehensive, if not yet a general theory of Japan's approach to regionalism because it applies not only to the present, but to the past as well. And it has to be stressed, the past refers not only to the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere of the 1940s but also to the decades before. (shrink)
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  40.  4
    Lewis Carrolls Symbolic Logic: Part I and Part Ii[REVIEW]F. K. C. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):472-473.
    Professor Bartley makes a valuable contribution to the learning of logic, to the study of the history of logic, and to the study of British literature by (...)
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  41.  6
    An Australian Bishop at Vatican II: Matthew Beovich's Council Diary.Josephine Laffin - 2014 - The Australasian Catholic Record 91 (4):387.
    Laffin, Josephine The archbishop of Adelaide, it must be acknowledged, did not play a prominent role at Vatican II. Matthew Beovich never gave a speech in the (...)
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  42.  5
    Philip II's Patronage of Science and Engineering.David Goodman - 1983 - British Journal for the History of Science 16 (1):49-66.
    Philip II a patron of the sciences? This aspect of his turbulent reign, like many others, bas brought conflicting assessments. He bas been praised for his enterprise (...)
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  43.  3
    Once Again, John Paul IIs Fides Et Ratio.Eduardo J. Echeverria - 2004 - Philosophia Reformata 69 (1):38-52.
    Roy Clousers reply to my article on John Paul IIs 1998 encyclical Fides et Ratio is learned, engaging, clear--and, respectfully put, full of errors on (...)
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  44.  4
    Fitting Geomagnetic Fields Before the Invention of Least Squares: II. William Whiston's Isoclinic Maps of Southern England (1719 and 1721). [REVIEW]Richard J. Howarth - 2003 - Annals of Science 60 (1):63-84.
    (2003). Fitting Geomagnetic Fields before the Invention of Least Squares: II. William Whiston's Isoclinic Maps of Southern England (1719 and 1721) Annals of Science: Vol. 60, (...)No. 1, pp. 63-84. (shrink)
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  45. Truth, Set of 3 Volumes : Vol. I: Translated by Robert W. Mulligan, S. J., Vol. Ii: Translated by James V. Mcglynn, S. J., Vol. Iii: Translated by Robert W. Schmidt, S. J[REVIEW]Thomas Aquinas & R. W. Schmidt - 1994 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    A translation based on the Latin text of the Leonine edition. The Quaestiones Disputatae de Veritate constitutes Aquinas's most extended treatment of any single topic. Volume (...)I discusses the nature of truth and divine and angelic intellects. Volume II deals with truth and human intellect. Volume III investigates the operation of the will. (shrink)
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  46. Socrates and Alcibiades: Four Texts: Plato's Alcibiades I & Ii, Symposium , Aeschines' Alcibiades.David Johnson - 2002 - Focus.
    _Socrates and Alcibiades: Four Texts _gathers together translations our four most important sources for the relationship between Socrates and the most controversial man of his day, the (...)
     
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  47. The Commentary of Al-Nayrizi on Books Ii-Iv of Euclid's Elements of Geometry : With a Translation of That Portion of Book I Missing From Ms Leiden Or. 399.1 but Present in the Newly Discovered Qom Manuscript Edited by Rüdiger Arnzen[REVIEW]Anthony Lo Bello - 2009 - Brill.
    The Commentary of al-Nayrizi on Euclids Elements occupies an important place in the history of mathematics and of philosophy. The present work presents an annotated English (...) translation of Books II-IV and of a hitherto lost portion of Book I. (shrink)
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  48. Gender in Theology: the Example of John Paul II's Mulieris Dignitatem.Lawrence B. Porter - 1996 - Gregorianum 77 (1):97-131.
    L'A. s'intéresse à la question des genres en théologie en prenant l'exemple d'une Encyclique du Pape Jean-Paul II sur la femme et sa dignité (...), Mulieris Dignitatem. La théologie féministe a donné, en effet, une importance nouvelle à cette question. Le document pontifical contient une analyse phénoménologique des différences entre les sexes et rejoint certaines analyses féministes. L'A. en profite pour soulever le problème de l'ordination des femmes au ministère presbytéral, et pour résoudre exhaustivement ce problème avec la substance de l'Encyclique. (shrink)
     
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  49.  56
    Two Caricatures, II: Leibniz's Best World.J. Franklin - 2002 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (1):45-56.
    Leibniz's best-of-all-possible worlds solution to the problem of evil isdefended. Enlightenment misrepresentations are removed. The apparentobviousness of the possibility of better worlds is undermined (...)by the muchbetter understanding achieved in modern mathematical sciences of howglobal structure constrains local possibilities. It is argued that alternativeviews, especially standard materialism, fail to make sense of the problem ofevil, by implying that evil does not matter, absolutely speaking. Finally, itis shown how ordinary religious thinking incorporates the essentials ofLeibniz's view. (shrink)
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  50.  59
    Religions's Moral Compass and a Just Economic Order: Reflections on Pope John Paul II's Encyclicalcentesimus Annus.S. Prakash Sethi & Paul Steidlmeier - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (12):901 - 917.
    The purpose of Pope John Paul''s encyclicalCentesimus Annus (CA) is to propound the foundations of a just economic order and to sketch its essential characteristics. As (...)such he essentially provides an orientation or moral compass for the political economy rather than a precise road map. This article first reviews the principal components of CA and then analyzes and evaluates its central contentions on both cultural and economic grounds. (shrink)
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