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Struan Jacobs [52]Scott Jacobs [12]S. Jacobs [4]Straun Jacobs [3]
Susan L. Jacobs [2]Sharon Jacobs [2]Steven Leonard Jacobs [2]S. J. Jacobs [2]

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Profile: Struan Jacobs (Deakin University)
Profile: Sharon Jacobs
Profile: Spencer Jacobs (Florida Gulf Coast University)
Profile: Shelby Jacobs (Western Washington University)
  1. Argumentation.Scott Jacobs, Sally Jackson, Frans Eemeren & Frans H. van Eemeren - 1st ed. 2015 - In Scott Jacobs, Sally Jackson, Frans Eemeren & Frans H. van Eemeren (eds.), Reasonableness and Effectiveness in Argumentative Discourse. Springer Verlag.
     
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  2. Michael Polanyi and Karl Mannheim.Phil Mullins & Struan Jacobs - 2005 - Tradition and Discovery 32 (1):20-43.
    This essay reviews historical records that set forth the discussions and interaction of Michael Polanyi and Karl Mannheim/rom 1944 until Mannheim’s death early in 1947. The letters describe Polanyi’s effort to assemble a book to be published in a series edited by Manneheim. Theyalso reveal the different perspectives these thinkers took about freedom and the historical context of ideas. Records of J.H. Oldham’s discussion group “the Moot” suggest that these and other differences in philosophy were debated in meetings of “the (...)
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  3.  26
    Rhetoric and Dialectic From the Standpoint of Normative Pragmatics.Scott Jacobs - 2000 - Argumentation 14 (3):261-286.
    Normative pragmatics can bridge the differences between dialectical and rhetorical theories in a way that saves the central insights of both. Normative pragmatics calls attention to how the manifest strategic design of a message produces interpretive effects and interactional consequences. Argumentative analysis of messages should begin with the manifest persuasive rationale they communicate. But not all persuasive inducements should be treated as arguments. Arguments express with a special pragmatic force propositions where those propositions stand in particular inferential relations to one (...)
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  4.  57
    Two Sources of Michael Polanyi's Prototypal Notion of Incommensurability: Evans-Pritchard on Azande Witchcraft and St Augustine on Conversion.Struan Jacobs - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):57-76.
    Michael Polanyi argues in Personal Knowledge (1958) that conceptual frameworks involved in major scientific controversies are separated by a `logical gap'. Such frameworks, according to Polanyi (1958: 151), are logically disconnected: their protagonists think differently, use different languages and occupy different worlds. Relinquishing one framework and adopting another, Polanyi's scientist undergoes a `conversion' to a new `faith'. Polanyi, in other words, presaged Kuhn and Feyerabend's concept of incommensurability. To what influences was Polanyi subject as he developed his concept of the (...)
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  5.  6
    Thomas Kuhn's Memory.Struan Jacobs - 2009 - Intellectual History Review 19 (1):83-101.
  6.  70
    Tradition in a Free Society: The Fideism of Michael Polanyi and the Rationalism of Karl Popper.Struan Jacobs - 2009 - Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):8-25.
    Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper offer contrasting accounts of social tradition. Popper is steeped in the heritage of the Enlightenment, while Polanyi interweaves religious and diverse secular strands of thought. Explaining the liberal tradition, Polanyi features tacit knowledge of rules, standards, applications and interpretations being transmitted by “craftsmen” to “apprentices.” Each generation adopts the liberal tradition on “faith,” commits to creatively developing its art of knowledge-in-practice, and is drawn to the spiritual reality of ideal ends. Of particular interest to Popper (...)
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  7.  22
    Empowering Women: A Labor Rights-Based Approach: Case Studies From East African Horticultural Farms. [REVIEW]Bénédicte Brahic & Susie Jacobs - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):601-619.
    This article discusses the hitherto little-studied question of women workers’ empowerment through access to labor rights in the east African export horticultural sector. It is based on the work carried out by Women Working Worldwide and its east African partners, drawing on primary research on cut-flower farms in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda. The focus in discussions of women’s empowerment has tended to be on individual actors rather than collective strategies. We argue that strategies such as action research, education, organization and (...)
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  8.  78
    Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper: The Fraying of a Long-Standing Acquaintance.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2012 - Tradition and Discovery 38 (2):61-93.
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  9. Science and British Liberalism : Locke, Bentham, Mill, and Popper.Struan Jacobs - 1991
     
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  10. Sociology as a Source of Anomaly in Thomas Kuhn's System of Science.Struan Jacobs & Brian Mooney - 1997 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (4):466-485.
    It is a testimony to the enduring importance of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions that, 30 years on, its doctrines of normal science and paradigm, incommensurability and revolution continue to challenge metascien tists and stimulate vigorous debate. Critique has mainly come from philosophers and historians; by and large, interested sociologists have embraced Kuhn. Un justifiably so, this article argues, bringing to light a serious difficulty or "anom aly" in his account of the social side of science. Contrary to (...)
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  11.  26
    Polanyi's Presagement of the Incommensurability Concept.Struan Jacobs - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):101-116.
    Kuhn and Feyerabend have little to say about the thought of Michael Polanyi, and the secondary literature on Polanyi's relation to them is meagre. I argue that Polanyi's view, in Personal knowledge and in other writings, of conceptual frameworks 'segregated' by a 'logical gap' as giving rise to controversies in science foreshadowed Kuhn and Feyerabend's theme of incommensurability. The similarity between the thinkers is, I suggest, no coincidence.
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  12.  3
    Faith, Tradition, and Dynamic Order: Michael Polanyi's Liberal Thought From 1941 to 1951.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2008 - History of European Ideas 34 (1):120-131.
    In his writings between 1941 and 1951, Michael Polanyi developed a distinctive view of liberal social and political life. Planned organizations are a part of all modern societies, according to Polanyi, but in liberal modernity he highlighted dynamic social orders whose agents freely adjust their efforts in light of the initiatives and accomplishments of their peers. Liberal society itself is the most extensive of dynamic orders, with the market economy, and cultural orders of scientific research, Protestant religious inquiry, and common (...)
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  13.  36
    Tradition in a Free Society.Struan Jacobs - 2009 - Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):8-25.
    Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper offer contrasting accounts of social tradition. Popper is steeped in the heritage of the Enlightenment, while Polanyi interweaves religious and diverse secular strands of thought. Explaining the liberal tradition, Polanyi features tacit knowledge of rules, standards, applications and interpretations being transmitted by “craftsmen” to “apprentices.” Each generation adopts the liberal tradition on “faith,” commits to creatively developing its art of knowledge-in-practice, and is drawn to the spiritual reality of ideal ends. Of particular interest to Popper (...)
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  14.  7
    Nonfallacious Rhetorical Strategies: Lyndon Johnson's Daisy Ad. [REVIEW]Scott Jacobs - 2006 - Argumentation 20 (4):421-442.
    The traditional concepts of rhetorical strategy and argumentative fallacy cannot be readily reconciled. Doing so requires escaping the following argument: All argumentation involves rhetorical strategies. All rhetorical strategies are violations of logical or dialectical ideals. All violations of logical or dialectical ideals are fallacies. Normative pragmatics provides a perspective in which rhetorical strategies can be seen to have the potential for constructive contributions to argumentation and in which fallacies are not simply violations of ideals. One kind of constructive contribution, framing (...)
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  15.  37
    John Stuart Mill on Induction and Hypotheses.Struan Jacobs - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (1):69-83.
    A study of the development of Mill's thought through successive editions of _A System of Logic. His view of the genesis of most scientific laws, it is argued, progressively shifted from inductivism to hypothetico-deductivism. Mill's analysis of hypotheses and of methods for their assessment is considered in detail. New light is shed on relations between Mill's metascience and that of William Whewell.
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  16.  37
    Brains/Practices/Relativism.Struan Jacobs - 2004 - Tradition and Discovery 31 (2):49-50.
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  17.  52
    Vindicating Universalism.S. Jacobs - 1989 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (1):75-80.
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  18.  36
    Michael Polanyi and Thomas Kuhn.Struan Jacobs - 2006 - Tradition and Discovery 33 (2):25-36.
    The article argues that Polanyi was a likely source of influence on the theory of science that Kuhn developed in his The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962). The striking similarity between Kuhn’s idea ofincommuensurability and Polanyi’s rendering of scientific controversy in Personal Knowledge is featured here, and is used to expose a tension between Polanyi's notions of scientific controversy and unfolding truth.
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  19.  42
    Classical and Conservative Liberalism.Struan Jacobs - 1999 - Tradition and Discovery 26 (1):5-15.
    An extended discussion of Richard Allen’s Beyond Liberalism: The Political Thought of F. A. Hayek & Michael Polanyi in which the book’s prominent themes and arguments are described, and certain inaccuracies and shortcomings noted.
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  20.  16
    Speech Acts and Arguments.Scott Jacobs - 1989 - Argumentation 3 (4):345-365.
    Speech act theory seems to provide a promising avenue for the analysis of the functional organization of argument. The theory, however, might be taken to suggest that arguments are a homogenous class of speech act with a specifiable illocutionary force and a single set of felicity conditions. This suggestion confuses the analysis of the meaning of speech act verbs with the analysis of the pragmatic structure of actual language use. Suggesting that arguments are conveyed through a homogeneous class of linguistic (...)
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  21.  58
    Rationalism and Tradition: The Popper-Oakeshott Conversation.S. Jacobs & I. Tregenza - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (1):3-24.
    In 1948 Karl Popper sent a copy of his paper, ‘Utopia and Violence’, to Michael Oakeshott. Popper had recently read Oakeshott’s essay ‘Rationalism in Politics’, appreciating its relevance to views he had expressed in The Open Society. Oakeshott wrote to Popper at some length, explaining his thoughts about reason, tradition and kindred matters, to which Popper responded. This paper reproduces these letters and discusses them with reference to pertinent writings of Popper and Oakeshott. While showing there was much common ground (...)
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  22.  22
    Locke, McCann, and Voluntarism.Struan Jacobs & Allan McNeish - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):349–362.
    Locke scholars continue to disagree over how he analyzed natural laws, real essence-power relations in physical substances. Some say he regarded them as emanations, necessitated by the corpuscular structure of real essences; for others his laws are adventitious, imposed on substances by God and contingent on divine alterable will. The second view has been increasingly favored in recent years, assisted no doubt by Edwin McCann's potent case for it in "Lockean Mechanism" (1985). The present article, whose authors are sympathetic to (...)
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  23.  3
    Relevance and Digressions in Argumentative Discussion: A Pragmatic Approach.Scott Jacobs & Sally Jackson - 1992 - Argumentation 6 (2):161-176.
    Digressions in argumentative discussion are a kind of failure of relevance. Examination of what actual cases look like reveals several properties of argumentative relevance: (1) The informational relevance of propositions to the truth value of a conclusion should be distinguished from the pragmatic relevance of argumentative acts to the task of resolving a disagreement. (2) Pragmatic irrelevance is a collaborative phenomenon. It does not just short-circuit reasoning; it encourages a failure to take up the demands of an argumentative task. (3) (...)
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  24.  30
    Toward the Construction of a Post-Shoah Interfaith Dialogical Universal Ethic.Steven Leonard Jacobs - 2003 - Zygon 38 (3):735-742.
    The essay is an attempt to construct a new interfaith dialogical universal ethic after the Holocaust/Shoah, after first examining several biblical passages of both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, namely Leviticus 19:13–18; Matthew 22:34–40; Matthew 5:43–48; and Luke 10:25–37. The author contends that the foundational Jewish and Christian scriptural texts can no longer be read, understood, and either interpreted or reinterpreted the way they were prior to the events of 1933–1945. Thus, following an examination of the scriptural passages (...)
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  25.  24
    Spontaneous Order: Michael Polanyi and Friedrich Hayek.Struan Jacobs - 2000 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (4):49-67.
    This paper compares Hayek and Polanyi on spontaneous social order. Although Hayek is widely believed to have first both coined the name and explicated the idea of ?spontaneous order?, it is in fact Michael Polanyi who did so. Numerous differences emerge between the two thinkers. The characterisation of spontaneous order in Hayek, for example, involves different types of freedom to those advanced by Polanyi. Whereas Hayek (usually) portrays spontaneous order as a single entity, which is equivalent to free society as (...)
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  26.  7
    Genesis of the Concept of Genocide According to its Author From the Original Sources.Steven Leonard Jacobs - 2002 - Human Rights Review 3 (2):98-103.
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  27.  44
    Michael Polanyi and Spontaneous Order, 1941-1951.Struan Jacobs - 1997 - Tradition and Discovery 24 (2):14-28.
    Polanyi’s theory of spontaneous order is set in historical context, analyzed, and compared to Friedrich Hayek’s version.
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  28.  1
    Anthropological Materials in the Making of Michael Polanyi's Metascience.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (2):261-285.
    Anthropological discussions were important for Michael Polanyi in the middle phase of his intellectual career, in which he articulated in some detail his understanding of science, culture and society. This middle period commenced with his 1946 Riddell Memorial Lectures at Durham University in early 1946, published as Science, Faith and Society later that year, and extended through the publication of Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy in 1958, based on Polanyi’s 1951 and 1952 Gifford Lectures. The Riddell Lectures gave Polanyi’s (...)
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  29.  1
    Bentham, Science and the Construction of Jurisprudence.Struan Jacobs - 1990 - History of European Ideas 12 (5):583-594.
  30.  11
    The Genesis of 'Scientific Community'.Struan Jacobs - 2001 - Social Epistemology 16 (2):157 – 168.
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  31.  16
    Laws of Nature, Corpuscules, and Concourse.Struan Jacobs - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:373-393.
    It has been said that Robert Boyle gave in the century of The Scientific Revolution the “fullest expression” of the view that laws of nature are continually impressed by God (“occasionalism”). So regarded, the universe is anything but an autonomous machine, its ordered operation depending on God’s continuous imposition of lawful, patterned relations between phenomena and his continuous provision of motion for them to actually enter relations. The present paper contests this treatment of Boyle. Evidence is elicited to show that, (...)
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  32.  20
    From Logic to Liberty: Theories of Knowledge in Two Works of John Stuart Mill.Struan Jacobs - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (4):751 - 767.
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  33.  48
    Edward Shils' Theory of Tradition.Struan Jacobs - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (2):139-162.
    Edward Shils presented his book Tradition (1981) as the first extensive study of the subject. This article casts light on Shils' multifaceted understanding of tradition, comprising pragmatic, Burkean, veridical, and evolutionist perspectives. His typology of traditions is noted, and his view of institutional bearers of tradition described. In assessing Shils' theory, however, we find that it overreaches, collapsing differences that exist between traditions, transmissions, and the traditional. Key Words: tradition • transmission • rationalization • antitradition • science.
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  34.  30
    Thoughts on Political Sources of Karl Popper's Philosophy of Science.Struan Jacobs - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Research 24:445-457.
    How did Karl Popper arrive at his theory of science? Popper believed that Einstein’s general theory of relativity and his attitudes of modesty and self-criticism were all important.This paper challenges details in Popper’s account and suggests an alternative interpretation of the formation of his theory. It is held that his disillusionment with Marxism predated and conditioned his understanding of Einstein, and that the liberalism of J. S. Mill may have exercised an influence . Political ideas and practice paved the way (...)
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  35.  4
    Employing and Exploiting the Presumptions of Communication in Argumentation: An Application of Normative Pragmatics.Scott Jacobs - 2016 - Informal Logic 36 (2):159-191.
    Argumentation occurs through and as communicative activity. Communication is organized by pragmatic principles of expression and interpretation. Grice’s theory of conversational implicature provides a model for how people use rational principles to manage the ways in which they reason to representations of arguments, and not just reason from those representations. These principles are systematic biases that make possible reasonable decision-making and intersubjective understandings in the first place; but they also make possible all manner of errors and abuses. Much of what (...)
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  36.  2
    Brains/Practices/Relativism: Social Theory After Cognitive Science. [REVIEW]Struan Jacobs - 2004 - Tradition and Discovery 31 (2):49-50.
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  37.  2
    Michael Polanyi and Thomas Kuhn: Priority and Credit.Struan Jacobs - 2006 - Tradition and Discovery 33 (2):25-36.
    The article argues that Polanyi was a likely source of influence on the theory of science that Kuhn developed in his The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. The striking similarity between Kuhn’s idea ofincommuensurability and Polanyi’s rendering of scientific controversy in Personal Knowledge is featured here, and is used to expose a tension between Polanyi's notions of scientific controversy and unfolding truth.
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  38.  2
    Thoughts on Political Sources of Karl Popper’s Philosophy of Science.Struan Jacobs - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Research 24:445-457.
    How did Karl Popper arrive at his theory of science? Popper believed that Einstein’s general theory of relativity and his attitudes of modesty and self-criticism were all important.This paper challenges details in Popper’s account and suggests an alternative interpretation of the formation of his theory. It is held that his disillusionment with Marxism predated and conditioned his understanding of Einstein, and that the liberalism of J. S. Mill may have exercised an influence. Political ideas and practice paved the way for (...)
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  39.  24
    Relations Between Karl Popper and Michael Polanyi.Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):426-435.
  40.  12
    Tradition as a Topic of Philosophic Interest in Britain in the 1940s.Struan Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:313-335.
    Between 1945 and 1948, Michael Polanyi, Michael Oakeshott, and Karl Popper respectively discussed the nature of tradition, and the part that traditions play in free societies. This article analyzes these thinkers’ ideas of tradition. Polanyi depicted tradition as knowledge that is embodied in skilled practice, and tradition for Oakeshott consists in activities that are suffused with practical knowledge and technique. Popper emphasized rational criticizability, whereas Polanyi and Oakeshott emphasized the tacit dimension of traditions.
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  41.  7
    Sociology as a Serious Source of Anomaly in Thomas Kuhn's System of Science.Struan Jacobs & T. Brian Mooney - unknown
    It is a testimony to the enduring importance of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions that, 30 years on, its doctrines of normal science and paradigm, incommensurability and revolution continue to challenge metascien tists and stimulate vigorous debate. Critique has mainly come from philosophers and historians; by and large, interested sociologists have embraced Kuhn. Un justifiably so, this article argues, bringing to light a serious difficulty or anom aly in his account of the social side of science. Contrary to (...)
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  42.  28
    The Life of a Renaissance Man: Michael Polanyi.Struan Jacobs - 2006 - Sophia 45 (1):117-120.
  43.  10
    Brains/Practices/Relativism: Social Theory After Cognitive Science/Stephen Turner.Struan Jacobs - 2005 - Tradition and Discovery 31 (2):49-50.
  44.  22
    J. B. Conant's Other Assistant: Science as Depicted by Leonard K. Nash, Including Reference to Thomas Kuhn.Struan Jacobs - 2010 - Perspectives on Science 18 (3):328-351.
    Born in 1918 in New York, awarded a doctorate in analytical chemistry (1944), Leonard K. Nash enjoyed a distinguished career at Harvard, holding a chair of chemistry from 1959 to 1986. Conducting research in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, Nash authored successful textbooks, some of which remain in print (e.g. Elements of Chemical Thermodynamics, and Elements of Statistical Thermodynamics).This essay describes the theory of science that Nash developed in a book he published in 1963, The Nature of the Natural Sciences. The (...)
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  45.  16
    Post‐Liberalism Vs. Temperate Liberalism.Struan Jacobs - 1990 - Critical Review 4 (3):365-375.
    John Gray's recent critique of liberalism, and his case for an apparently relativistic ?post?Pyrrhonian?; political philosophy, are shown to be wanting. Weaknesses in Gray's critique are identified and discussed: the characterization of liberalism as universally prescriptive, confusion about whether liberalism is a genuine tradition, and misunderstanding of the relation between conduct and the value of freedom. A formulation of liberalism that is not universalist ("temperate?; liberalism) is offered, and it is shown that one of liberalism's vital concerns?controlling political power in (...)
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  46.  4
    Michael Polanyi on the Education and Knowledge of Scientists.Struan Jacobs - 2000 - Science and Education 9 (3):309-320.
  47.  1
    Laws of Nature, Corpuscules, and Concourse: Non-Occasionalist Tendencies in the Natural Philosophy of Robert Boyle.Struan Jacobs - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:373-393.
    It has been said that Robert Boyle gave in the century of The Scientific Revolution the “fullest expression” of the view that laws of nature are continually impressed by God. So regarded, the universe is anything but an autonomous machine, its ordered operation depending on God’s continuous imposition of lawful, patterned relations between phenomena and his continuous provision of motion for them to actually enter relations. The present paper contests this treatment of Boyle. Evidence is elicited to show that, for (...)
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  48.  1
    Polanyi's Presagement of the Incommensurability Concept.Struan Jacobs - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):101-116.
    Kuhn and Feyerabend have little to say about the thought of Michael Polanyi, and the secondary literature on Polanyi's relation to them is meagre. I argue that Polanyi's view, in Personal knowledge and in other writings, of conceptual frameworks ‘segregated’ by a ‘logical gap’ as giving rise to controversies in science foreshadowed Kuhn and Feyerabend's theme of incommensurability. The similarity between the thinkers is, I suggest, no coincidence.
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  49.  1
    Tradition as a Topic of Philosophic Interest in Britain in the 1940s.Struan Jacobs - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:313-335.
    Between 1945 and 1948, Michael Polanyi, Michael Oakeshott, and Karl Popper respectively discussed the nature of tradition, and the part that traditions play in free societies. This article analyzes these thinkers’ ideas of tradition. Polanyi depicted tradition as knowledge that is embodied in skilled practice, and tradition for Oakeshott consists in activities that are suffused with practical knowledge and technique. Popper emphasized rational criticizability, whereas Polanyi and Oakeshott emphasized the tacit dimension of traditions.
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  50.  1
    Tradition in a Free Society: The Fideism of Michael Polanyi and the Rationalism of Karl Popper.Struan Jacobs - 2009 - Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):8-25.
    Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper offer contrasting accounts of social tradition. Popper is steeped in the heritage of the Enlightenment, while Polanyi interweaves religious and diverse secular strands of thought. Explaining the liberal tradition, Polanyi features tacit knowledge of rules, standards, applications and interpretations being transmitted by “craftsmen” to “apprentices.” Each generation adopts the liberal tradition on “faith,” commits to creatively developing its art of knowledge-in-practice, and is drawn to the spiritual reality of ideal ends. Of particular interest to Popper (...)
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