95 found
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  1.  36
    The Varieties of Cheating.S. K. Wertz - 1981 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 8 (1):19-40.
  2.  24
    The Knowing In Playing.S. K. Wertz - 1978 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 5 (1):39-49.
  3.  53
    Sport and the Àrtistic.S. K. Wertz - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (233):392 - 393.
    Recently David Best has advanced the claim that sport is not an art form, and that although sport may be aesthetic, it is not artistic. Such a claim is false and runs counter to ordinary usage and sport practice. On behalf of sport practice, let me cite as an example the world-class Canadian skater, Toller Cranston, who thinks there are such things as ‘artistic sports, those being gymnastics, diving, figure skating’. Best claims that athletes like Cranston are conceptually confused and (...)
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  4.  23
    A Response to Best on Art and Sport.S. K. Wertz - 1984 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 18 (4):105.
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  5.  35
    Is Sport Unique? A Question of Definability.S. K. Wertz - 1995 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 22 (1):83-93.
  6.  65
    The five flavors and taoism: Lao Tzu's verse twelve.S. K. Wertz - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (3):251 – 261.
    In verse twelve of the Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu makes a curious claim about the five flavors; namely that they cause people not to taste or that they jade the palate. The five flavors are: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and spicy or hot as in 'heat'. To the Western mind, the claim, 'The five flavors cause them [persons] to not taste,' is counterintuitive; on the contrary, the presence of the five flavors in a dish or in a meal would (...)
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  7. Dance as Portrayed in the Media.Ishtiyaque Haji, Stefaan E. Cuypers, Yannick Joye, S. K. Wertz, Estelle R. Jorgensen, Iris M. Yob, Jeffrey Wattles, Sabrina D. Misirhiralall, Eric C. Mullis & Seth Lerer - 2013 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):72-95.
    This article attempts to answer a question that many dancers and non-dancers may have. What is dance according to the media? Furthermore, how does the written word portray dance in the media? To answer these ques-tions, this research focuses on the role that the discourse of dance in media plays in the public sphere’s knowledge construction of dance. This is impor-tant to study because the public sphere’s meaning of dance will determine whether dance education is promoted or banned in schools (...)
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  8.  40
    Hume, History, and Human Nature.S. K. Wertz - 1975 - Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (3):481-496.
    This paper presents evidence and arguments against an interpretation of david Hume's idea of history which insists that he held to a static conception of human nature. This interpretation presumes that hume lacks a genuine historical perspective, and that consequently his notion of historiography contains a fallacy (viz., Of the universal man). It is shown here that this interpretation overlooks an important distinction between methodological and substantive uniformity in hume's discussion of human nature and action. When this distinction is appreciated, (...)
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  9.  32
    The Zen Way to the Martial Arts.S. K. Wertz - 1984 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 11 (1):94-103.
  10.  46
    Are Sports Art Forms?S. K. Wertz - 1979 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 13 (1):107.
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  11.  47
    On Wittgenstein and James.S. K. Wertz - 1972 - New Scholasticism 46 (4):446-448.
  12.  35
    The Capriciousness of Play: Collingwood’s Insight.S. K. Wertz - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):159-165.
  13.  13
    Collingwood and Mead's Theory of History.S. K. Wertz - 2022 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 28 (2):65-83.
  14.  14
    ABBA: An Educational Appreciation.Vladimir J. Konečni, Damien Freeman, S. K. Wertz, Pascal Gielen, Jannie Ph Pretorius, D. Stephan du Toit, Colwyn Martin, Glynnis Daries & Alzo David-West - 2013 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (1):72-103.
    In this essay the authors provide arguments that teaching is an art and that teachers can learn much about their trade from a careful study of the performances of other artists. Artists and teachers have the same basic challenge: in order to be successful, both groups have to obtain and retain peoples’ attention. This also holds for popular music artists. Ten female student teachers specializing in the Pre-school and Foundation phases of schooling (four-to-six-year olds), and six lecturers from the Faculty (...)
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  15.  64
    The Elements of Taste: How Many Are There?S. K. Wertz - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (1):46-57.
    The perception created by the combination of olfaction and taste is called flavor.What is the number of tastes or flavors we have? Is it five, as most Chinese believe? None, as the ancient Taoists asserted? Four, as Western science traditionally claims? Or is it six or seven or even fourteen? World cuisines are at odds on this issue, and I shall briefly explore here their reasons for their numbers. There is a consensus among some of the elements that tells us (...)
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  16.  88
    Taste and Food in Rousseau's Julie, or the New Heloise.S. K. Wertz - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):24-35.
    What are the historical origins of aesthetic education? One of these comes from the eighteenth century. This became an important theme in a novel of the time. Published in 1761, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Julie, or the New Heloise: Letters of Two Lovers Who Live in a Small Town at the Foot of the Alps1 was an instant success in eighteenth-century Europe. Widely read, the novel made European culture self-conscious and forced it to pay attention to aspects of living that had gone (...)
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  17. Collingwood's Understanding of Hume.S. K. Wertz - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (2):261-287.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hume Studies Volume XX, Number 2, November 1994, pp. 261-287 Collingwood's Understanding of Hume S. K. WERTZ What was David Hume's reception in the British idealistic tradition? In this paper, I shall contribute a short chapter on this question by examining Hume's place in R. G. Collingwood's thought.1 Such an examination has been lacking in the literature, so what follows is a comprehensive study of Collingwood's use of Hume (...)
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  18.  12
    Food Dynamics.S. K. Wertz - 2022 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (1):41-47.
    As an account of food, associationism has shortcomings as an explana­tion of taste and eating. It maintains that only ideas are associated or related to one another and not perceptions. Perceptions, according to this theory, are independent of one another. Food presents a challenge for associationism because food has a cogni­tive dimension, i.e., judgments are made about its ingredients, presentation, order or sequence of tasting, and so on. Consequently, the scientific field of dynamics offers a viable alternative explanation with its (...)
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  19.  11
    Probability and Lycan’s Paradox.R. D. Boyd & S. K. Wertz - 1988 - Southwest Philosophy Review 4 (2):85-85.
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  20.  18
    "Not both $p$ and $q$, therefore if $p$ then $q$" is a valid form of argument.S. K. Wertz - 1977 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 18 (4):611-612.
  21.  9
    Averting Arguments: Nagarjuna’s Verse 29.S. K. Wertz - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 24:70-73.
    I examine Nagarjuna’s averting an opponent’s argument, Paul Sagal’s general interpretation of Nagarjuna and especially Sagal’s conception of "averting" an argument. Following Matilal, a distinction is drawn between locutionary negation and illocationary negation in order to avoid errant interpretations of verse 29 The argument is treated as representing an ampliative or inductive inference rather than a deductive one. As Nagarjuna says in verse 30: "That [denial] of mine [in verse 29] is a non-apprehension of non-things" and non-apprehension is the averting (...)
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  22.  88
    Art's detour: A clash of aesthetic theories.S. K. Wertz - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (1):pp. 100-106.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Art's DetourA Clash of Aesthetic TheoriesS. K. Wertz (bio)Both John Dewey1 and Martin Heidegger2 thought that art's audience had to take a detour in order to appreciate or understand a work of art. They wrote about this around the same time (mid-1930s) and independently of one another, so this similar circumstance in the history of aesthetics is unusual since they come from very different philosophical traditions. What was it (...)
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  23.  48
    Are Genetically Modified Foods Good for You? A Pragmatic Answer.S. K. Wertz - 2005 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):129-137.
    A review of the arguments that make up the current controversy on genetically modified foods (GMFs) is briefly given as well as an assessment of their cogency. The two main arguments for GMFs are utilitarian (we can feed a greater number of people with them than without) and environmental (we can increase the food supply without diminishing the wilderness areas by displacing them with farm land). The arguments against evolve around the idea of unforeseen consequences which could have irreversible effects (...)
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  24.  24
    Are Interpretational Constructs Question Begging?S. K. Wertz - 2007 - Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (2):77-83.
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  25.  13
    A Note on The Hidden Cartesianism in Hyland's Methodological Suggestions for Sports Inquiry.S. K. Wertz - 1976 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 3 (1):118-120.
  26.  15
    A Program for Research and Instruction in the Philosophy of Sport: A Collingwoodian Recommendation.S. K. Wertz - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (3):97-102.
  27.  50
    Berkeley’s Chimeras: A Comment on Hill.S. K. Wertz - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (2):201-204.
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  28.  15
    Brentano's Psycho-Intentional Criterion.S. K. Wertz - 1968 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1968 (1):5-15.
  29.  14
    Consciousness and Death in Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (2):53-58.
    The novel Doctor Zhivago has not received the attention it has deserved lately—even much less for its philosophical ideas—so in this essay I want to bring attention to Boris Pasternak's notion of the nature of consciousness, which I find quite interesting. Yurii Zhivago, one of the principal characters in Doctor Zhivago, says the following about the experience of death: Will you [Anna Ivanovona] feel pain? Do the tissues feel their disintegration? In other words, what will happen to your consciousness? But (...)
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  30. Composition and Mill's Utilitarian Principle.S. K. Wertz - 1971 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 52 (3):417.
     
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  31.  20
    Collingwood and Racial Considerations.S. K. Wertz - 2021 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 27 (1):99-115.
    R. G. Collingwood (1889–1943) had several arguments that analyzed race in history and anthropology. These appear mainly in Roman Britain (both in theory and practice of history), The Idea of History, and The Principles of History. This latter work, which is fairly new to Collingwood scholarship (1999), contains the most important arguments. Collingwood argued that race is grounded in the historical process and this includes a people's environment, more so than genetics or evolution. He used the nature of art as (...)
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  32.  19
    Collingwood and the Evidential Value of Testimony.S. K. Wertz - 2018 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 24 (1):27-40.
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  33.  16
    Collingwood, Dewey, Realism and its Demise.S. K. Wertz - 2021 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 27 (2):227-240.
  34.  29
    Collingwood's Logic of Question and Answer Revisited.S. K. Wertz - 2015 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 21 (2):185-200.
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  35.  28
    Collingwood on Certainty in History.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 23 (1):31-40.
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  36.  25
    Descartes and the Argument by Complete Enumeration.S. K. Wertz - 1999 - Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):137-147.
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  37.  44
    Descartes and the paradox of the stone.S. K. Wertz - 1984 - Sophia 23 (1):16-24.
  38.  33
    Deep Interpretations of Sport.S. K. Wertz - 1999 - Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):81-95.
  39.  6
    Deconstructing Sport, in Particular, Football: A Response to Boxill.S. K. Wertz - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (1):97-99.
  40.  17
    Eating and Dining: Collingwood's Anthropology.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 23 (2):247-258.
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  41.  30
    Food and the Association of Perceptions.S. K. Wertz - 2019 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):295-304.
    It has long been claimed and supposedly substantiated that there exists an association of ideas, but not of perceptions (that is, sensations or impressions). Collingwood echoed this claim from Hume, but Hume later in the Treatise produced an association of impressions (actually emotions and passions), so he came close to Hobbes’s position: human physiology has “trains of sense” and these are carried on in human thought—what we call “ideas” (he called “decaying sense”). A strong case can be made for this (...)
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  42.  14
    G. H. Mead: Socially Structured Aesthetic Experiences.S. K. Wertz - 2022 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 56 (4):1-11.
    Abstract:In speaking of his analyses, George Herbert Mead (1863– 1931) announces: “It is behavioristic where the approach to experience is made through conduct.” He turns this approach to the practice of the arts and the aesthetic experience. His approach consists of an analysis of gestures and attitudes as the beginning of acts that we bring with us to the activities in which we are engaged. A gesture would be, for example, offering someone a chair who has entered a room. Usually (...)
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  43.  37
    Hume's Aesthetic Realism.S. K. Wertz - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):53-61.
  44.  8
    Hume and the Historiography of Science.S. K. Wertz - 1993 - Journal of the History of Ideas 54 (3):411-436.
  45.  51
    Human Nature and Art: From Descartes and Hume to Tolstoy.S. K. Wertz - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 32 (3):75-81.
    Leo Tolstoy's theory of human nature is sketched with Descartes's and Hume's theories of human nature in the background for context. Tolstoy's view is limited to "What Is Art"?, although it could be substantially augmented by references to his other well-known works. "By words a man transmits his thoughts," to which Tolstoy adds, "by means of art he transmits his feelings." Language and art work together to give us an aesthetic education that is built around the forms of communication found (...)
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  46.  47
    Hume's Narrow Circle Aesthetically Expanded.S. K. Wertz - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (4):1-4.
    How does aesthetic education begin and expand over time? David Hume’s idea of the narrow circle provides us with an answer when considering this question. He uses the narrow circle to explain how moral practices evolve, and by analogy, we can also use this conception to explain how aesthetic practices evolve. So I will first of all begin with a discussion of his essay “The Standard of Taste.”1 In this essay, Hume gives an excellent profile of the critic who has (...)
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  47.  46
    Hume’s Use of The Game Analogy.S. K. Wertz - 1972 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):127-135.
  48.  46
    Is Hume's Use of Evidence as Bad as Norton Says It Is?S. K. Wertz - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (9999):79-86.
    THIS ESSAY DEALS WITH D F NORTON’S INTERPRETATION OF HUME’S METHODOLOGY IN THE LATTER’S FAMOUS DISCUSSION OF MIRACLES IN THE FIRST INQUIRY. NORTON CONSTRUES "EXPERIENCE" TO MEAN PERSONAL, INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCE. THE AUTHOR SHOWS THAT THERE IS ANOTHER SENSE OF THE WORD WHICH IS MORE COSMOPOLITAN AND ONE WHICH SQUARES MORE WITH THE USES OF EVIDENCE FOUND IN THE "HISTORY OF ENGLAND". ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATIONS OF THE HUME PASSAGE ARE GIVEN AND HUME’S METHOD IS COMPARED WITH R G COLLINGWOOD’S IMAGINATIVE RECONSTRUCTIONIST IDEA (...)
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  49.  34
    Intrinsic Value and Sentimentalism: Comments on Pasternack.S. K. Wertz - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):21-24.
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  50.  19
    Leibniz and Culinary Cognitions: A Speculative Journey.S. K. Wertz - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (3):83-95.
    We eat not only because it is necessary for us to, but also and much more because eating gives us pleasure.In this essay, I develop a case for G. W. Leibniz as our first modern food philosopher. It is in his theory of perception and in his culinary examples that I find the most convincing evidence, especially when I contrast them with Locke and Hume’s account of perception with reference to food. In the process, Leibniz expanded aesthetic perception to include (...)
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