33 found
Order:
See also
Profile: S. Marc Cohen (University of Washington)
  1. Hylomorphism and Functionalism.S. Marc Cohen - 1992 - In Martha Nussbaum & Amelie Rorty (eds.), Essays on Aristotle’s De Anima. Clarendon Press. pp. 57-73.
  2.  49
    Kooky Objects Revisited: Aristotle's Ontology.S. Marc Cohen - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (1):3–19.
    This is an investigation of Aristotle's conception of accidental compounds (or "kooky objects," as Gareth Matthews has called them)—entities such as the pale man and the musical man. I begin with Matthews's pioneering work into kooky objects, and argue that they are not so far removed from our ordinary thinking as is commonly supposed. I go on to assess their utility in solving some familiar puzzles involving substitutivity in epistemic contexts, and compare the kooky object approach to more modern approaches (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  3. Wants and Lacks.Gareth B. Matthews & S. Marc Cohen - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (14):455-456.
    Anthony Kenny says it is impossible to want what one already has and knows one has. We present a counter-example and then suggest that Kenny may have been misled by the fact that wanting expresses itself in goal-directed behavior. From the truism that one's behavior cannot be directed toward a goal that one knows one has already attained, Kenny may have been led to suppose that behavior directed toward an as yet unattained goal cannot express one's desire for what one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4. Socrates on the Definition of Piety.S. Marc Cohen - 1971 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (1):1-13.
    The central argument in the Euthyphro is the one Socrates advances against the definition of piety as "what all the gods love." The argument turns on establishing that a loved thing (philoumenon) is 1) a loved thing because it is loved (phileitai), not 2) loved because it is a loved thing. I suggest that this claim can be understood and found acceptable if we take "because" to be used equivocally in it. Despite the equivocation, Socrates' argument is valid, showing that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Essentialism in Aristotle.S. Marc Cohen - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):387-405.
    Quine, in an influential passage, characterizes a certain kind of metaphysical view as "Aristotelian essentialism." Recent work on Aristotle suggests that he may not have been an essentialist in Quine's sense. This paper examines the question whether, and to what extent, Aristotle is committed to the kind of essentialism Quine discusses. Various promising areas of Aristotle's thought (alteration vs. coming-to-be and passing-away, kath' hauto predication) are examined and found wanting as sources of essentialism. Instead, Aristotle is found to be committed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6. Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays.Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Euthyrphro, Apology, andCrito portray Socrates' words and deeds during his trial for disbelieving in the Gods of Athens and corrupting the Athenian youth, and constitute a defense of the man Socrates and of his way of life, the philosophic life. The twelve essays in the volume, written by leading classical philosophers, investigate various aspects of these works of Plato, including the significance of Plato's characters, Socrates's revolutionary religious ideas, and the relationship between historical events and Plato's texts.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  82
    Aristotle's Metaphysics.S. Marc Cohen - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The first major work in the history of philosophy to bear the title "Metaphysics" was the treatise by Aristotle that we have come to know by that name. But Aristotle himself did not use that title or even describe his field of study as 'metaphysics'; the name was evidently coined by the first century C.E. editor who assembled the treatise we know as Aristotle's Metaphysics out of various smaller selections of Aristotle's works. The title 'metaphysics' -- literally, 'after the Physics' (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Individual and Essence in Aristotle's Metaphysics.S. Marc Cohen - 1978 - Paideia (Special Aristotle Edition):75-85.
    Aristotle's claim in Metaphysics Z.6 that "each substance is the same as its essence" has long puzzled commentators. For it seems to conflict with two other Aristotelian theses: (1) primary substances are individuals (e.g., Socrates and Callias), and (2) essences are universals (e.g., Man and Horse). Three traditional solutions to this difficulty are considered and rejected. Instead, to make the Z.6 equation consistent with (1) and (2), I propose that it be interpreted to be making something other than a straightforward (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  96
    Aristotle on the Principle of Non-Contradiction.S. Marc Cohen - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):359-370.
    Critical discussion of Alan Code's paper "Aristotle's Investigation of a Basic Logical Principle: Which Science Investigates the Principle of Non-Contradiction?".
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  70
    The One and the Many.Gareth B. Matthews & S. Marc Cohen - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):630-655.
    We discuss Aristotle's "Categories" as an answer to Plato's One-over-Many argument. For Plato, F-ness is something "over against" particular F things; to predicate "F" of these things is to assert that they all stand in a certain relation to F-ness. Aristotle answers that predication is classification; and there being a classification of a certain sort is a fact correlative with there being things classifiable in the way the classification in question would classify them.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. Aristotle and Individuation.S. Marc Cohen - 1984 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1984 (s.v.):41-65.
    It is traditionally maintained that according to Aristotle, matter provides a principle of individuation. Objections of several sorts have been raised against this interpretation. One objection holds that for Aristotle it is form, rather than matter, that individuates. A more radical objection is that Aristotle does not propose any principle of individuation at all. Any adequate discussion of this issue must make clear precisely what problems such a principle is meant to address. This in turn requires that several important distinctions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  90
    Substances.S. Marc Cohen - 2009 - In Georgios Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Blackwell-Wiley.
    This is a survey of Aristotle's development of the concept of substance in the Categories and Book VII (Zeta) of the Metaphysics. We begin with the Categories conception of a primary substance as that which is not "in a subject" -- i.e., not ontologically dependent on anything else -- and also not "said of a subject" -- i.e., not predicated of any item beneath it in its categorial tree. This gives us the idea of primary substances as ontologically basic individuals, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  92
    The Logic of the Third Man.S. Marc Cohen - 1971 - Philosophical Review 80 (4):448-475.
    The main lines of interpretation offered to date of the Third Man Argument in Plato's Parmenides (132a1-b2) are considered and rejected. A new, set-theoretic, reconstruction of the argument is offered. It is concluded that the philosophical point of the argument is different from what it has been generally supposed to be: Plato is pointing out the logical shortcomings in his earlier formulated principle of One-Over-Many.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  67
    Substance and Essence in Aristotle. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101:838-40.
    Review of Substance and Essence in Aristotle: an Interpretation of Metaphysics VII-IX, by Charlotte Witt (Cornell University Press: 1989).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  67
    Analyzing Plato's Arguments: Plato and Platonism.S. Marc Cohen & David Keyt - 1992 - In J. Klagge & N. Smith (eds.), Methods of Interpreting Plato and his Dialogues. Oxford University Press.
    The historian of philosophy often encounters arguments that are enthymematic: they have conclusions that follow from their explicit premises only by the addition of "tacit" or "suppressed" premises. It is a standard practice of interpretation to supply these missing premises, even where the enthymeme is "real," that is, where there is no other context in which the philosopher in question asserts the missing premises. To do so is to follow a principle of charity: other things being equal, one interpretation is (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  53
    Alteration and Persistence: Form and Matter in the Physics and Gen. Et Corr.S. Marc Cohen - 2012 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oup Usa. pp. 205.
    Aristotle takes up the topic of change (or coming-to-be and ceasing-to-be) in both the Physics and De Generatione et Corruptione. He distinguishes between simple coming-to-be (substantial change), as when something comes into existence, and qualified coming-to-be (accidental change), as when an already existing thing alters, or moves, or changes in some other way. But he also maintains a persistence principle: that in every change, whether simple or qualified, there is something that persists throughout the change. I examine the question of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Substance and Essence in Aristotle: An Interpretation of Metaphysics VII-IX.S. Marc Cohen & Charlotte Witt - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):838.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. The Allegory of the Cave.S. Marc Cohen - 2008 - Philosophy 320.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  44
    Socrates, Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (1):153-57.
    Review of Socrates, Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues, by Gerasimos X. Santas (Routledge & Kegan Paul: 1979).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  45
    Substantial Knowledge: Aristotle's Metaphysics. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):452-456.
    Review of Substantial Knowledge: Aristotle's Metaphysics, by C.D.C Reeve (Hackett: 2000).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. On Aristotle's Categories.S. Marc Cohen & Gareth B. Matthews - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
    Translation with notes of Ammonius' Commentary on Aristotle's Categories.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  32
    Divine Substance. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1982 - Noûs 16:334-39.
    Review of Divine Substance, by Christopher Stead (Oxford, Clarendon Press: 1977).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  36
    Metaphysics. Books 7-10. Zeta, Eta, Theta, Iota. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):312-313.
    Review of Aristotle’s Metaphysics: Books Zeta, Eta, Theta, and Iota, translation and commentary by Montgomery Furth (Hackett: 1985).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  28
    Primary Ousia. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):397-99.
    Review of Primary Ousia: An Essay on Aristotle's Metaphysics Z and H, by Michael J. Loux (Cornell University Press: 1991).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  24
    The Concept of Pleasure. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1969 - Philosophical Review 78 (3):386-390.
    Review of The Concept of Pleasure, by David L. Perry (Mouton:1967).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. The Credibility of Aristotle's Philosophy of Mind.S. Marc Cohen - 1987 - In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Aristotle Today. Academic Printing and Publishing. pp. 103-121.
  27. Aristotle and Individuation.S. Marc Cohen - 1984 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 10:41.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Accidental Beings in Aristotle's Ontology.S. Marc Cohen - 2013 - In G. Anagnostopoulos & Miller Jr (eds.), Reason and Analysis in Ancient Greek Philosophy: Essays in Honor of David Keyt. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 231-242.
    This is an examination of Aristotle's notion of an "accidental being" -- something intermediate between a substance and a property. An accidental being (sometimes called "accidental compound" or "kooky object") is an ephemeral object, typically the compound of a substance and a property, that exists for only as long as its components are united. I set out the role that accidental beings play in Aristotle's solutions to several philosophical problems. I also investigate the similarity between these beings and the individual (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Aristotle, "Metaphysics. Books 7-10. Zeta, Eta, Theta, Iota". [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):312.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Analysing Plato's Arguments: Plato and Platonism.S. Marc Cohen & David Keyt - 1992 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:173-200.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Incorrigibility, Avowals and the Concept of Unconscious Desire.S. Marc Cohen - 1967 - Dissertation, Cornell University
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  11
    Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy From Thales to Aristotle.S. Marc Cohen, Patricia Curd & C. D. C. Reeve (eds.) - 1995 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Soon after its publication, _Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy_ was hailed as the favorite to become _the 'standard' text for survey courses in ancient philosophy. Nothing on the market touches it for comprehensiveness, accuracy, and readability._*. Fifteen years on, that prediction has been borne out, and the volume's preeminence as the leading anthology for the teaching of ancient philosophy still stands. The Fourth Edition features a completely revamped and expanded unit on the Presocratics and Sophists that draws on the wealth (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Substantial Knowledge: Aristotle’s Metaphysics. [REVIEW]S. Marc Cohen - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):452-456.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography