6 found
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  1. The Secular State and Religious Conflict: Liberal Neutrality and the Indian Case of Pluralism.S. N. Balagangadhara & Jakob De Roover - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):67–92.
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  2.  13
    John Locke, Christian Liberty, and the Predicament of Liberal Toleration.Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):523-549.
  3.  63
    Comparative Anthropology and Action Sciences - An Essay on Knowing to Act and Acting to Know.S. N. Balagangadhara - 1987 - Philosophica 40.
    It begins by suggesting that it would be reasonable to accept the idea that theories of conversation and theories of argumentation are closely related. Working on the assumption that there is a close relationship between the two, it looks at some cross-cultural scenarios, and show how our theories of conversations generate implausible conclusions if asked to account for these scenarios. These conclusions, it shows, arise due to culture-specific assumptions made by theories of conversation.
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  4.  72
    The Saint, the Criminal and the Terrorist: Towards a Hypothesis on Terrorism.S. N. Balagangadhara & Jakob De Roover - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):1-15.
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  5.  29
    Are Dialogues Antidotes to Violence? Two Recent Examples From Hinduism Studies.S. N. Balagangadhara & Sarah Claerhout - 2008 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):118-143.
    One of the convictions in religious studies and elsewhere is about the role dialogues play: by fulfilling the need for understanding, dialogues reduce violence. In this paper, we analyze two examples from Hinduism studies to show that precisely the opposite is true: dialogue about Hinduism has become the harbinger of violence. This is not because ‘outsiders’ have studied Hinduism or because the Hindu participants are religious ‘fundamentalists’ but because of the logical requirements of such a dialogue. Generalizing the structure of (...)
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  6.  19
    Liberty, Tyranny and the Will of God.Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara - 2009 - History of Political Thought 30 (1):111-139.
    Early modern political thought transformed toleration from a prudential consideration into a moral obligation. Three questions need to be answered by any explanation of this transition: Did religious toleration really become an obligation of the state in this period? If this was the case, how could tolerating heresy and idolatry possibly become a moral duty to Christians? How could Europeans both condemn practices as idolatrous and immoral, and yet insist that these practices ought to be tolerated? To answer these questions, (...)
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