11 found
Order:
  1. Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions in the Psychological Journal Literature, 1969-1983: A Descriptive Study.S. R. Coleman & Rebecca Salamon - 1988 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (4):415-446.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex.S. R. Coleman - 1985 - Behaviorism 13 (2):99-124.
    From its earliest beginnings, American conditioning research using human subjects had to deal with the possibility that subjects might voluntarily control the reaction that the experimenter attempts to condition, with the result that voluntary control contaminates the study of conditioning in humans. A preliminary solution to the problem was achieved around 1940, ending the time frame of this survey. This article provides an historical survey of the conceptual background of the opposition of volition and reflexes; describes manifestations of the problem (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex Part II. Voluntary-Responding Subjects, 1951-1980.S. R. Coleman - 1988 - Behavior and Philosophy 16 (1):17.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. An Essay Reviewof Mechanisms of Adaptive Behavior: Clark L. Hull's Theoretical Papers, with Commentary, Edited by A. Amsel and ME Rashotte. Columbia University Press: New York. 1984. [REVIEW]I. Gormezano & S. R. Coleman - 1985 - Behaviorism 13 (2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    Classical Conditioning and the "Law of Effect": Historical and Empirical Assessment.S. R. Coleman - 1979 - Behavior and Philosophy 7 (2):1.
  6. An Essay Review of Mechanisms of Adaptive Behavior: Clark L. Hull's Theoretical Papers, with Commentary, Edited by A. Amsel and M. E. Rashotte. Columbia University Press: New York. 1984.I. Gormezano & S. R. Coleman - 1985 - Behaviorism 13 (2):171-182.
  7. Pavlov and the Equivalence of Associability in Classical Conditioning.S. R. Coleman - 2007 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):115.
    The discovery of selective associability of cues in classical conditioning has often been treated as an embarrassment to Pavlov, because he has been represented as a proponent of the "equivalence of associability of cues." According to that doctrine, except for the influence of differences in stimulus intensity, all environmental stimuli are equally susceptible to becoming conditioned stimuli if they are arranged in a suitable time-relation to any effective unconditioned stimulus . The current paper asks whether Pavlov explicitly made such a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  15
    Adaptiveness, Law-of-Effect Theory, and Control-System Theory.S. R. Coleman - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):253-253.
    It is suggested that the control-system theory of Domjan et al. restates in engineering vocabulary the primary thesis of law-of-effect theories: namely, that classical-conditioning arrangements may involve CR-contingent reinforcement. The research cited by Domjan et al. is relevant to the idea that classical conditioning is an adaptive process, but is irrelevant to their control-system theory.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Historical Context and Systematic Functions of the Concept of the Operant.S. R. Coleman - 1981 - Behavior and Philosophy 9 (2):207.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  9
    The Decline of a Research Speciality: Human-Eyelid Conditioning in the Late 1960's.S. R. Coleman & Sandra Webster - 1990 - Behavior and Philosophy 18 (1):19 - 42.
    Human-eyelid conditioning was the principal source of information on Pavlovian conditioning, especially human, in the 1950s and 1960s, but it suffered a sharp decline in productivity, beginning in the late 1960s. The present article treats the decline as a case study with potential implications concerning the survival contingencies of research specialties. We make use of questionnaire data from eyelid-conditioning researchers and examine a variety of publication, topic-of-investigation, and institutional data to identify the major factors in the decline of human-eyelid conditioning.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  17
    The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex. Part II. Voluntary-Responding Subjects, 1951-1980.S. R. Coleman & Sandra Webster - 1988 - Behaviorism 16 (1):17-49.
    The operation of voluntary processes can contaminate the study of Pavlovian conditioned responses in humans. The problem of voluntary control had apparently been solved by about 1940, particularly in human eyelid conditioning. Nonetheless, the problem returned in the early 1950s, calling forth a variety of methodological procedures for removing voluntary responses and/or voluntary-responding subjects from eyelid-conditioning data. During the 1960s, disagreement arose regarding the efficiency and comparability of alternative data-correction procedures; the rationale for data-correction; and whether, and under what experimental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation