Results for 'S. Riegle'

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  1.  43
    What is Nomad Art? A Benjaminian Reading of Deleuze's Riegl.Jay Hetrick - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (1):27-41.
    In A Thousand Plateaus, Deleuze and Guattari offer a description of what they call ‘nomad art’ by detailing its three primary characteristics: close-range vision, haptic space, and abstract line. In an attempt to unpack the significance of this provocative term, this paper will sketch the provenance of the first two of these characteristics, both of which come from Deleuze and Guattari's particular reading of Alois Riegl. Together, close-range vision and haptic space delineate the synaesthetic vision of the artist as well (...)
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  2. Structural Determinants, Individual Choices, and Black Males: A Review of Ferguson's Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculiity. [REVIEW]S. Riegle - 2004 - Journal of Thought 39 (2):97-102.
  3.  44
    Deleuze's Tensive Notion of Painting in the Light of Riegl, Wöölfflin and Worringer.Vlad Ionescu - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (1):52-62.
    Deleuze's Logique de la sensation is not a canonical art historical interpretation of Francis Bacon's painting and even less an illustration of Deleuze's philosophy. It is better read as a prolegomena to a semiotics of plastic art in which the visual image is related to the dialectics of touch and vision. These issues feature strongly in the art theories of Aloïïs Riegl, Wilhelm Worringer and Heinrich Wöölfflin. This article presents a comparative approach to the relation between Deleuze's and these writers’’ (...)
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  4.  23
    An “Ecological” View of Styles of Science and of Art: Alois Riegl’s Explorations of the Style Concept.Chunglin Kwa - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):610-618.
    This paper compares the views of styles of science of Alistair Crombie and Ian Hacking with the notion of styles of art, as developed by Alois Riegl at the end of the 19th Century. Important similarities are noted, notably in the conceptualization of the autonomy of styles. Riegl developed in particular the notion of Kunstwollen , which encompasses an implied relation to the world, in both a cognitive and an ethical sense, and a relation to the public of art. The (...)
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  5.  12
    Essay: The Kunstwollen of the Scientific Era and Alois Riegl’s Stimmung.Konstantinos Vassiliou - 2018 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 27 (55-56):65-81.
    Alois Riegl’s essay “Die Stimmung als Inhalt der modernen Kunst” has been one of art historiography’s early attempts to bridge art and science. In this text, Riegl not only presents the background of some of his theoretical and methodological premises but he also provides an overarching argument for the way natural sciences af- fect modern spectatorship. In this way, he establishes the basis of a Kunstwollen for the ‘age of the natural sciences’ and describes its appropriate artistic traits. Addressing the (...)
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  6. 10. From Empirical Evidence to the Big Picture: Some Reflections on Riegl's Concept of Kunstwollen From Empirical Evidence to the Big Picture: Some Reflections on Riegl's Concept of Kunstwollen (Pp. 741-766). [REVIEW]Stanley Cavell - 2006 - Critical Inquiry 32 (4).
     
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  7.  29
    From Empirical Evidence to the Big Picture: Some Reflections on Riegl’s Concept of Kunstwollen.Jas' Elsner - 2006 - Critical Inquiry 32 (4):741.
  8. Time and History in Alois Riegl's Theory of Perception.Mike Gubser - 2005 - Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (3):451-474.
  9.  22
    Validation by Touch in Kandinsky's Early Abstract Art.Margaret Olin - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 16 (1):144-172.
    Some recent artists and critics have taken it upon themselves to demystify the notion of stylistic unity. Their task has included the historical reconception of a few “modernist” artists along “postmodern” lines, usually as precursors of current semiotic strategies.11 These artists may have used a set of incompatible styles to expose the artificiality of competing stylistic conventions, or even to challenge the myth that celebrates the authenticity of artistic expressiveness. Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp, otherwise very different artists, have both (...)
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  10. Art and Bewilderment.Jakub Stejskal - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):131-147.
    In this paper, I seek to defend the proposition that bewilderment can contribute to the interest we take in artworks. Taking inspiration from Alois Riegl’s underdeveloped explanation of why his contemporaries valued some historically distant artworks higher than recent art, I interpret the historical case of the European audiences’ fascination with the Fayum mummy portraits as involving such a bewilderment. I distinguish the claim about effective bewilderment from the thesis that aesthetic meaning resists discursive understanding and seek to establish that (...)
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  11.  52
    The Genesis of Iconology.Jaś Elsner & Katharina Lorenz - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (3):483-512.
    Erwin Panofsky explicitly states that the first half of the opening chapter of Studies in Iconology—his landmark American publication of 1939—contains ‘the revised content of a methodological article published by the writer in 1932’, which is now translated for the first time in this issue of Critical Inquiry.1 That article, published in the philosophical journal Logos, is among his most important works. First, it marks the apogee of his series of philosophically reflective essays on how to do art history,2 that (...)
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  12.  22
    "Form," Nineteenth-Century Metaphysics, and the Problem of Art Historical Description.David Summers - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 15 (2):372-406.
    It will be useful to consider briefly how the ideas surrounding “form” work in practice. Such ideas rapidly developed to a high stage of sophistication, subtlety, and complexity, but they did not, I believe, stray from the foundations I have tried to indicate for them. Let us consider the example of Wilhelm Worringer, who, like Alois Riegl, found it preferable to discuss ornament rather than images because ornament is a purer expression of form and therefore provides a less encumbered view (...)
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  13. Writing Art History: Disciplinary Departures.Margaret Iversen & Stephen Melville - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Faced with an increasingly media-saturated, globalized culture, art historians have begun to ask themselves challenging and provocative questions about the nature of their discipline. Why did the history of art come into being? Is it now in danger of slipping into obsolescence? And, if so, should we care? In _Writing Art History_, Margaret Iversen and Stephen Melville address these questions by exploring some assumptions at the discipline’s foundation. Their project is to excavate the lost continuities between philosophical aesthetics, contemporary theory, (...)
     
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  14.  8
    As Noções de Stimmung em uma Série Histórica: entre Disposição e Atmosfera.Arlenice Almeida da Silva - 2016 - Trans/Form/Ação 39 (s1):53-74.
    RESUMO: A relação entre arte e filosofia é examinada com base na noção de Stimmung, que surge no século XVIII, na teoria musical, como relação de proporção entre tons ou instrumentos, sendo, em seguida, transposta para a estética, no final do século, com Kant e Fichte. Em Kant, a Stimmung refere-se à disposição das faculdades de conhecimento para um conhecimento em geral, isto é, como o pressuposto da apresentação estética, por meio da qual se preserva a noção de proporção entre (...)
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  15.  4
    Rhythm as Aesthetic Commonplace.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Between 1900 and 1914, rhythm became a commonplace in aesthetics and art history. In addition to Riegl's and Schmarsow's general studies which embraced large sections of Near-Eastern and Western history, it spread in numerous specialized fields devoted to more limited periods. The time had come for an application of the concepts which had just been invented. Since the Vienna school was weakened by the sudden death of Riegl in 1905, most of this new works however were - Esthétique (...)
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  16.  4
    Rhythm as Form of Aesthetic Process – Architecture.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter In 1910, Hans Hermann Russack, one of August Schmarsow's students in Leipzig, published an essay entitled Der Begriff des Rhythmus bei den deutschen Kunsthistorikern des XIX. Jahrhunderts – The Concept of Rhythm in the German Art Historians of the 19th Century. This study was far from complete: it barely mentioned Aloïs Riegl and the competitors of the Viennese school; it referred only indirectly to Wilhelm Pinder and gave - Architecture – Nouvel article.
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  17.  1
    Stil Und Abgeschiedenheit.Mari Hvattum - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (6):831-844.
    In his famous essay “Der moderne Denkmalkultus. Sein Wesen und seine Entstehung” from 1903, the Austrian historian and art theorist Alois Riegl pondered why it is that the modern observer is able to appreciate the monuments of the past. It seems an odd question. The nineteenth century was obsessed with history; its artists and architects were often accused of appreciating nothing but the past. Yet, Riegl’s question is prescient. If, as the historicists had long professed, there are no absolute or (...)
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  18.  46
    Godel's Proof.S. R. Peterson - 1961 - Philosophical Quarterly 11 (45):379.
    In 1931 the mathematical logician Kurt Godel published a revolutionary paper that challenged certain basic assumptions underpinning mathematics and logic. A colleague of Albert Einstein, his theorem proved that mathematics was partly based on propositions not provable within the mathematical system and had radical implications that have echoed throughout many fields. A gripping combination of science and accessibility, Godel’s Proof by Nagel and Newman is for both mathematicians and the idly curious, offering those with a taste for logic and philosophy (...)
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  19. Aristotle's Metaphysics.S. Marc Cohen - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The first major work in the history of philosophy to bear the title "Metaphysics" was the treatise by Aristotle that we have come to know by that name. But Aristotle himself did not use that title or even describe his field of study as 'metaphysics'; the name was evidently coined by the first century C.E. editor who assembled the treatise we know as Aristotle's Metaphysics out of various smaller selections of Aristotle's works. The title 'metaphysics' -- literally, 'after the Physics' (...)
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  20. Carnap’s Dream: Gödel, Wittgenstein, and Logical, Syntax.S. Awodey & A. W. Carus - 2007 - Synthese 159 (1):23-45.
    In Carnap’s autobiography, he tells the story how one night in January 1931, “the whole theory of language structure” in all its ramifications “came to [him] like a vision”. The shorthand manuscript he produced immediately thereafter, he says, “was the first version” of Logical Syntax of Language. This document, which has never been examined since Carnap’s death, turns out not to resemble Logical Syntax at all, at least on the surface. Wherein, then, did the momentous insight of 21 January 1931 (...)
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  21. Wittgenstein’s Place in Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1996 - Blackwell.
    This text provides a unique and compelling account of Wittgenstein's impact upon twentieth century analytic philosophy, from its inception at the turn of the ...
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  22. Moore’s Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person.Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    G. E. Moore observed that to assert, 'I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I don't believe that I did' would be 'absurd'. Over half a century later, such sayings continue to perplex philosophers. In the definitive treatment of the famous paradox, Green and Williams explain its history and relevance and present new essays by leading thinkers in the area.
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  23.  20
    Plato’s Democratic Entanglements: Athenian Politics and the Practice of Philosophy.S. Sara Monoson - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book, Sara Monoson challenges the longstanding and widely held view that Plato is a virulent opponent of all things democratic. She does not, however, offer in its place the equally mistaken idea that he is somehow a partisan of democracy. Instead, she argues that we should attend more closely to Plato's suggestion that democracy is horrifying and exciting, and she seeks to explain why he found it morally and politically intriguing.Monoson focuses on Plato's engagement with democracy as he (...)
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  24. Nature’s Experiments and Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences.Mary S. Morgan - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):341-357.
    This article explores the characteristics of research sites that scientists have called “natural experiments” to understand and develop usable distinctions for the social sciences between “Nature’s or Society’s experiments” and “natural experiments.” In this analysis, natural experiments emerge as the retro-fitting by social scientists of events that have happened in the social world into the traditional forms of field or randomized trial experiments. By contrast, “Society’s experiments” figure as events in the world that happen in circumstances that are already sufficiently (...)
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  25.  91
    Aristotle's Physics.R. S. - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (9):246-247.
  26.  60
    “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  27.  39
    Aristotle's Criticism of Presocratic Philosophy.R. S. & Harold Cherniss - 1935 - Journal of Philosophy 32 (22):610.
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  28. Penrose's Gödelian Argument A Review of Shadows of the Mind by Roger Penrose. [REVIEW]S. Feferman - 1995 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 2:21-32.
    In his book Shadows of the Mind: A search for the missing science of con- sciousness [SM below], Roger Penrose has turned in another bravura perfor- mance, the kind we have come to expect ever since The Emperor’s New Mind [ENM ] appeared. In the service of advancing his deep convictions and daring conjectures about the nature of human thought and consciousness, Penrose has once more drawn a wide swath through such topics as logic, computa- tion, artificial intelligence, quantum physics (...)
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  29.  12
    Plato's Cosmology.R. S. & Francis Macdonald Cornford - 1937 - Journal of Philosophy 34 (26):717.
  30. That's Interesting!: Towards a Phenomenology of Sociology and a Sociology of Phenomenology.Murray S. Davis - 1971 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (2):309-344.
  31. Sartre's "Being and Nothingness".S. Gardner - unknown
    Sebastian Gardner competently tackles one of Sartre's more complex and challenging works in this new addition to the Reader's Guides series.
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  32.  60
    “Here’s My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  33.  96
    Hempel's Paradox and Wason's Selection Task: Logical and Psychological Puzzles of Confirmation.Raymond S. Nickerson - 1996 - Thinking and Reasoning 2 (1):1 – 31.
    Hempel's paradox of the ravens has to do with the question of what constitutes confirmation from a logical point of view; Wason 's selection task has been used extensively to investigate how people go about attempting to confirm or disconfirm conditional claims. This paper presents an argument that the paradox is resolved, and that people's typical performance in the selection task can be explained, by consideration of what constitutes an effective strategy for seeking evidence of the tenability of universal or (...)
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  34. Plato's Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, and Crito.J. L. S., John Burnet & Plato - 1925 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 45 (4):150.
  35. Parkinson’s Disease Prediction Using Artificial Neural Network.Ramzi M. Sadek, Salah A. Mohammed, Abdul Rahman K. Abunbehan, Abdul Karim H. Abdul Ghattas, Majed R. Badawi, Mohamed N. Mortaja, Bassem S. Abu-Nasser & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (1):1-8.
    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. The symptoms generally come on slowly over time. Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking. Doctors do not know what causes it and finds difficulty in early diagnosing the presence of Parkinson’s disease. An artificial neural network system with back propagation algorithm is presented in this paper for helping doctors in identifying (...)
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  36. Bertlmann's Socks and the Nature of Reality.J. S. Bell - 2004 - In Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 139--158.
     
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  37.  92
    Gibson's Theory of Perception: A Case of Hasty Epistemologizing?Edward S. Reed & Rebecca K. Jones - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (4):519-530.
    Hintikka has criticized psychologists for "hasty epistemologizing," which he takes to be an unwarranted transfer of ideas from psychology (a discipline dealing with questions of fact) into epistemology (a discipline dealing with questions of method and theory). Hamlyn argues, following Hintikka, that Gibson's theory of perception is an example of such an inappropriate transfer, especially insofar as Hamlyn feels Gibson does not answer several important questions. However, Gibson's theory does answer the relevant questions, albeit in a new and radical way, (...)
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  38.  30
    Leibniz's 'New System' and Associated Contemporary Texts.R. S. Woolhouse & Richard Francks (eds.) - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume gathers together for the first time are all the key texts in a crucial debate in modern philosophy, centered on Leibniz's famous 1695 essay, the "New System of the Nature of Substances and their Communication," in which he introduced his strikingly original theory of metaphysics. His "system" became increasingly famous and drew him into discussion and development of these ideas, both in public and in private, with a variety of thinkers, most notably the great French philosopher Pierre Bayle. (...)
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  39.  1
    Soren Kierkegaard's Journals and Papers: Autobiographical: Part Two, 1848-1855.Søren Kierkegaard - 1967 - Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  40.  9
    What's New? Children Prefer Novelty in Referent Selection.Bob McMurray Jessica S. Horst, Larissa K. Samuelson, Sarah C. Kucker - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):234.
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  41.  23
    Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language.S. Montgomery Ewegen - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Plato’s dialogue Cratylus focuses on being and human dependence on words, or the essential truths about the human condition. Arguing that comedy is an essential part of Plato's concept of language, S. Montgomery Ewegen asserts that understanding the comedic is key to an understanding of Plato's deeper philosophical intentions. Ewegen shows how Plato’s view of language is bound to comedy through words and how, for Plato, philosophy has much in common with playfulness and the ridiculous. By tying words, language, and (...)
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  42. Berkeley's "Defense" of "Commonsense".S. Seth Bordner - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):315-338.
    Nearly as famous as his denial of the existence of matter is Berkeley's insistence that his philosophy is somehow a defense of commonsense. This is most often taken to mean that Berkeley thinks of his philosophy as supporting commonsense beliefs. However, the inadequacies of such views have persuaded some to disregard entirely Berkeley's claims about commonsense. Both readings are undesirable. Extant interpretations misunderstand the relationship between Berkeley's philosophy and commonsense. In this paper, I present a new account of how to (...)
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  43.  8
    “It’s Just Another Added Benefit”: Women’s Experiences with Employment-Based Egg Freezing Programs.S. A. Miner, W. K. Miller, C. Grady & B. E. Berkman - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (1):41-52.
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  44.  20
    Godel's Theorem in Focus.S. G. Shanker (ed.) - 1990 - Routledge.
    A layman's guide to the mechanics of Gödel's proof together with a lucid discussion of the issues which it raises. Includes an essay discussing the significance of Gödel's work in the light of Wittgenstein's criticisms.
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  45. Darwin's Argument in the Origin.M. J. S. Hodge - 1992 - Philosophy of Science 59 (3):461-464.
    Various claims have been made, recently, that Darwin's argumentation in the Origin instantiates and so supports some general philosophical proposal about scientific theorizing, for example, the "semantic view". But these claims are grounded in various incorrect analyses of that argumentation. A summary is given here of an analysis defended at greater length in several papers by the present author. The historical and philosophical advantages of this analysis are explained briefly. Darwin's argument comprises three distinct evidential cases on behalf of natural (...)
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  46.  19
    The Seducer's Diary.Søren Kierkegaard - 2013 - Princeton Univ Press.
    "In the vast literature of love, The Seducer's Diary is an intricate curiosity--a feverishly intellectual attempt to reconstruct an erotic failure as a pedagogic success, a wound masked as a boast," observes John Updike in his foreword to Søren Kierkegaard's narrative. This work, a chapter from Kierkegaard's first major volume, Either/Or , springs from his relationship with his fiancée, Regine Olsen. Kierkegaard fell in love with the young woman, ten years his junior, proposed to her, but then broke off their (...)
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  47.  79
    Stanford’s Unconceived Alternatives From the Perspective of Epistemic Obligations.Matthew S. Sample - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):856-866.
    Kyle Stanford’s reformulation of the problem of underdetermination has the potential to highlight the epistemic obligations of scientists. Stanford, however, presents the phenomenon of unconceived alternatives as a problem for realists, despite critics’ insistence that we have contextual explanations for scientists’ failure to conceive of their successors’ theories. I propose that responsibilist epistemology and the concept of “role oughts,” as discussed by Lorraine Code and Richard Feldman, can pacify Stanford’s critics and reveal broader relevance of the “new induction.” The possibility (...)
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  48.  12
    The Value of Nature's Otherness.S. A. Hailwood - 2000 - Environmental Values 9 (3):353-372.
    Environmentalist philosophers often paint a holistic picture, stressing such things as the continuity of humanity with wider nature and our membership of the 'natural community' . The implication seems to be that a non-anthropocentric philosophy requires that we strongly identify ourselves with nature and therefore that we downplay any human/non-human distinction. An alternative view, I think more interesting and plausible, stresses the distinction between humanity and a nature valued precisely for its otherness. In this article I discuss some of its (...)
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  49.  27
    Understanding Children's and Adults' Limitations in Mental State Reasoning.S. Birch - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):255-260.
  50.  7
    How to Interpret Covid-19 Predictions: Reassessing the IHME’s Model.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2021 - Philosophy of Medicine 1 (2).
    The IHME Covid-19 prediction model has been one of the most influential Covid models in the United States. Early on, it received heavy criticism for understating the extent of the epidemic. I argue that this criticism was based on a misunderstanding of the model. The model was best interpreted not as attempting to forecast the actual course of the epidemic. Rather, it was attempting to make a conditional projection: telling us how the epidemic would unfold, given certain assumptions. This misunderstanding (...)
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