Results for 'S. S. Molyneux'

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  1.  12
    M. J. Morgan's "Molyneux's Question". [REVIEW]George J. Stack - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (2):301.
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  2.  44
    Experiences with community engagement and informed consent in a genetic cohort study of severe childhood diseases in Kenya.V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing ethics' on (...)
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  3. Molyneux’s question and interpersonal variations in multimodal mental imagery among blind subjects.Bence Nanay - 2020 - In Brian Glenney (ed.), Molyneux's Question. London: Routledge. pp. 257-263.
    If the sight of cortically blind people were restored, could they visually recognize a cube or a sphere? This is Molyneux’s question. I argue that the answer to this question depends on the specificities of the mental setup of these cortically blind people. Some cortically blind people have (sometimes quite vivid) visual imagery. Others don’t. The answer to Molyneux’s question depends on whether the blind subjects have had visual imagery before their sight was restored. If they did, the (...)
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  4. Molyneux's Question Within and Across the Senses.John Schwenkler - 2019 - In Tony Cheng, Ophelia Deroy & Charles Spence (eds.), Spatial Senses: Philosophy of Perception in an Age of Science. Routledge.
    This chapter explores how our understanding of Molyneux’s question, and of the possibility of an experimental resolution to it, should be affected by recognizing the complexity that is involved in reidentifying shapes and other spatial properties across differing sensory manifestations of them. I will argue that while philosophers today usually treat the question as concerning ‘the relations between perceptions of shape in different sensory modalities’ (Campbell 1995, 301), in fact this is only part of the question’s real interest, and (...)
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  5. Locke's Answer to Molyneux's Thought Experiment.Mike Bruno & Eric Mandelbaum - 2010 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (2):165-80.
    Philosophical discussions of Molyneux's problem within contemporary philosophy of mind tend to characterize the problem as primarily concerned with the role innately known principles, amodal spatial concepts, and rational cognitive faculties play in our perceptual lives. Indeed, for broadly similar reasons, rationalists have generally advocated an affirmative answer, while empiricists have generally advocated a negative one, to the question Molyneux posed after presenting his famous thought experiment. This historical characterization of the dialectic, however, somewhat obscures the role (...)'s problem has played in spawning debates within the empiricist tradition. Fortunately, the differences between various empiricist accounts have been widely recognized and discussed among historians of philosophy working on the topic. The focus of the present essay is to develop an interpretation of John Locke's views on Molyneux's problem that best coheres with his other views on human understanding as well as with the predominant scientific opinion about the nature of perception during the period in which he lived. (shrink)
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  6.  94
    Molyneux’s Question and the History of Philosophy.Brian Glenney & Gabriele Ferretti (eds.) - 2020 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    In 1688 the Irish scientist and politician William Molyneux sent a letter to the philosopher John Locke. In it, he asked him a question: could someone who was born blind, and able to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch, be able to immediately distinguish and name these shapes by sight if given the ability to see? -/- The philosophical puzzle offered in Molyneux’s letter fascinated not only Locke, but major thinkers such as Leibniz, Berkeley, Diderot, Reid, (...)
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  7. Molyneux's Question.Brian Glenney - 2012 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Molyneux’s Question, also known as Molyneux’s Problem, soon became a fulcrum for early research in the epistemology of concepts, challenging common intuitions about how our concepts originate, whether sensory features differentiate concepts, and how concepts are utilized in novel contexts. It was reprinted and discussed by a wide range of early modern philosophers, including Gottfried Leibniz, George Berkeley, and Adam Smith, and was perhaps the most important problem in the burgeoning discipline of psychology of the 18th Century. The (...)
     
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  8. Molyneux's Question and the Berkeleian Answer.Peter Baumann - 2011 - In Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Perspectivas de la Modernidad. Siglos XVI, XVII y XVIII. Colección Artes y Humanidades. pp. 217-234.
    Amongst those who answered Molyneux’s question in the negative or at least not in the positive, George Berkeley is of particular interest because he argued for a very radical position. Most of his contribution to the discussion can be found in his Essay towards a New Theory of Vision. I will give an exposition of his view (2) and then move on to a critical discussion of this kind of view, - what one could call the “Berkeleian view” (3). (...)
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  9. Molyneux's question.Gareth Evans - 1985 - In Collected Papers. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception By Michael J. Morgan Cambridge University Press, 1977, vii + 213 pp., £7.50. [REVIEW]R. S. Woolhouse - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (207):136-137.
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  11. How to Test Molyneux's Question Empirically.Kevin Connolly - 2013 - I-Perception 4:508-510.
    Schwenkler (2012) criticizes a 2011 experiment by R. Held and colleagues purporting to answer Molyneux’s question. Schwenkler proposes two ways to re-run the original experiment: either by allowing subjects to move around the stimuli, or by simplifying the stimuli to planar objects rather than three-dimensional ones. In Schwenkler (2013) he expands on and defends the former. I argue that this way of re-running the experiment is flawed, since it relies on a questionable assumption that newly sighted subjects will be (...)
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  12. Molyneux's Questions.Peter Baumann - 2004 - In Ralph Schumacher (ed.), Perception and Reality. mentis. pp. 168-187.
    More than 300 years ago, William Molyneux raised an important and puzzling question which still creates a lot of controversy. What is known as “Molyneux’s question“ was made famous by John Locke’s quote of Molyneux in the second edition of the Essay Concerning Human Understanding: “Suppose a Man born blind, and now adult, and taught by his touch to distinguish between a Cube, and a Sphere of the same metal, and nighly of the same bigness, so as (...)
     
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  13. Molyneux’s question and the individuation of perceptual concepts.Janet Levin - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 139 (1):1 - 28.
    Molyneux's Question, that is, “Suppose a man born blind, and now adult, and taught by his touch to distinguish between a cube and a sphere... and the blind man made to see: Quaere, whether by his sight, before he touched them, he could now distinguish, and tell, which is the globe, which the cube”, was discussed by many theorists in the 17th and 18th centuries, and has recently been addressed by contemporary philosophers interested in the nature, and identity conditions, (...)
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  14.  33
    Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception By Michael J. Morgan Cambridge University Press, 1977, vii + 213 pp., £7.50. [REVIEW]R. S. Woolhouse - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (207):136-.
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  15. Molyneux’s Puzzle: Philosophical, Biological and Experimental Aspects of an Open Problem.Gabriele Ferretti - 2018 - Aphex 19.
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  16. Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception.Michael J. Morgan - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (207):136-137.
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  17. Molyneux’s Question.Robert Hopkins - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):441-464.
    What philosophical issue or issues does Molyneux’s question raise? I concentrate on two. First, are there any properties represented in both touch and vision? Second, for any such common perceptible, is it represented in the same way in each, so that the two senses support a single concept of that property? I show that there is space for a second issue here, describe its precise relations to Molyneux’s question, and argue for its philosophical significance. I close by arguing (...)
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  18. Molyneux’s Question in Berkeley’s Theory of Vision.Juan R. Loaiza - 2017 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 32 (2):231-247.
    I propose a reading of Berkeley's Essay towards a New Theory of Vision in which Molyneux-type questions are interpreted as thought experiments instead of arguments. First, I present the general argumentative strategy in the NTV, and provide grounds for the traditional reading. Second, I consider some roles of thought experiments, and classify Molyneux-type questions in the NTV as constructive conjectural thought experiments. Third, I argue that (i) there is no distinction between Weak and Strong Heterogeneity theses in the (...)
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  19.  9
    Molyneux's Question: The Irish Debates.Peter West & Manuel Fasko - 2020 - In Molyneux's Question and the History of Philosophy. pp. 122-135.
    William Molyneux was born in Dublin, studied in Trinity College Dublin, and was a founding member of the Dublin Philosophical Society (DPS), Ireland’s counterpart to the Royal Society in London. He was a central figure in the Irish intellectual milieu during the Early Modern period and – along with George Berkeley and Edmund Burke – is one of the best-known thinkers to have come out of that context and out of Irish thought more generally. In 1688, when Molyneux (...)
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  20. Molyneux's problem.Marjolein Degenaar - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21.  37
    Molyneux’s question and the amodality of spatial experience.Janet Levin - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (5-6):590-610.
    A recent study published in Nature Neuroscience purports to have answered a question posed to Locke in 1688 by his friend William Molyneux, namely, whether ‘a man born blind and made to see’ would be able to identify, immediately and by vision alone, objects previously known only by touch. The answer, according to the researchers – and as predicted by Molyneux, as well as Locke, Berkeley, and others – is ‘likely negative. The newly sighted subjects did not exhibit (...)
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  22. Molyneux’s Question and Somatosensory Spaces.Tony Cheng - 2020 - In Brian Glenney Gabriele Ferretti (ed.), Molyneux’s Question and the History of Philosophy.
  23. Molyneux's question and the idea of an external world.Naomi M. Eilan - 1993 - In Spatial Representation: Problems in Philosophy and Psychology. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  24. Locke's Solution to the Molyneux Problem.Wayne Waxman - unknown
    Philosophers and psychologists have debated the Molyneux problem since it first appeared in the 1694 edition of Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding [ECHU].1 My focus today is Locke’s solution and the account of seeing threedimensional objects it subserves. More particularly, I want to concentrate on the prominence he accorded to inwardly perceived mental activity in experience of the external world. When this aspect is fully understood, I believe, Locke emerges as the philosopher most responsible for establishing the framework in (...)
     
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  25. Obstacles to Testing Molyneux's Question Empirically.Tony Cheng - 2015 - I-Perception 6 (4).
    There have recently been various empirical attempts to answer Molyneux’s question, for example, the experiments undertaken by the Held group. These studies, though intricate, have encountered some objections, for instance, from Schwenkler, who proposes two ways of improving the experiments. One is “to re-run [the] experiment with the stimulus objects made to move, and/or the subjects moved or permitted to move with respect to them” (p. 94), which would promote three dimensional or otherwise viewpoint-invariant representations. The other is “to (...)
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  26. Molyneux's question redux.Alessandra C. Jacomuzzi, Pietro Kobau & Nicola Bruno - 2003 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):255-280.
    After more than three centuries, Molyneux's question continues to challenge our understanding of cognition and perceptual systems. Locke, the original recipient of the question, approached it as a theoretical exercise relevant to long-standing philosophical issues, such as nativism, the possibility of common sensibles, and the empiricism-rationalism debate. However, philosophers were quick to adopt the experimentalist's stance as soon as they became aware of recoveries from congenital blindness through ophtalmic surgery. Such recoveries were widely reported to support empiricist positions, suggesting (...)
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  27.  20
    Molyneux’s Question and the Semantics of Seeing.Dimitria Gatzia, Berit Brogaard & Bartek Chomanski - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook of Molyneux’s Question.
    The aim of this chapter is to shed new light on the question of what newly-sighted subjects are capable of seeing on the basis of previous experience with mind-independent, external objects and their properties through touch alone. This question is also known as “Molyneux’s Question.” Much of the empirically driven debate surrounding this question has been centered on the nature of the representational content of the subjects’ visual experiences. It has generally been assumed that the meaning of “seeing” deployed (...)
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  28. Molyneux's babies: Cross-modal perception, imitation, and the mind of the preverbal infant.Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1993 - In Naomi M. Eilan (ed.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell. pp. 219--235.
     
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  29. Molyneux's question and cognitive impenetrability.John Campbell - 2005 - In Athanassios Raftopoulos (ed.), Cognitive Penetrabiity of Perception: Attention, Strategies and Bottom-Up Constraints. New York: Nova Science.
     
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  30. Thomas Reid on Molyneux's question.Robert Hopkins - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):340-364.
    Reid’s discussion of Molyneux’s question has been neglected. The Inquiry discusses the question twice, offering opposing answers. The first discussion treats the underlying issue as concerning common perceptibles of touch and vision, and in particular whether in vision we originally perceive depth. Although it is tempting to treat the second discussion as doing the same, this would render pointless various novel features Reid introduces in reformulating Molyneux’s question. Rather, the issue now is whether the blind can form a (...)
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  31. Molyneux's question.John Campbell - 1996 - Philosophical Issues 7:301-318.
    in Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception (Philosophical Issues vol. 7) (Atascadero: Ridgeview 1996), 301-318, with replies by Brian Loar and Kirk Ludwig.
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  32. Molyneux’s Problem.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1974 - Journal of Philosophy 71 (October):637-650.
  33. What was Molyneux's Question A Question About?Jonathan Cohen & Mohan Matthen - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook on Molyneux's Question. London: Routledge.
    Molyneux asked whether a newly sighted person could distinguish a sphere from a cube by sight alone, given that she was antecedently able to do so by touch. This, we contend, is a question about general ideas. To answer it, we must ask (a) whether spatial locations identified by touch can be identified also by sight, and (b) whether the integration of spatial locations into an idea of shape persists through changes of modality. Posed this way, Molyneux’s Question (...)
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  34. Reid’s Answer to Molyneux’s Question.James Van Cleve - 2007 - The Monist 90 (2):251 - 270.
  35.  96
    Leibniz on Molyneux's Question.Brian Glenney - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (3):247-264.
    Might the once-blind recognize shapes familiar to the touch by sight alone? “Not”, replied both Locke and the question’s designer, William Molyneux. Leibniz, by contrast, replied, “yes” to Molyneux’s Question. However, Leibniz’s reason for his affirmative answer has yet to be discussed directly with any depth, a lacuna this paper seeks to address. The main contention of this paper is that Leibniz cannot think that sensory representations based on the sight and touch of shape sufficient for this task, (...)
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  36.  57
    Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception.Michael J. Morgan - 1977 - Cambridge University Press.
    If a man born blind were to gain his sight in later life would he be able to identify the objects he saw around him? Would he recognise a cube and a globe on the basis of his earlier tactile experiences alone? This was William Molyneux's famous question to John Locke and it was much discussed by English and French empiricists in the eighteenth century as part of the controversy over innatism and abstract ideas. Dr Morgan examines the whole (...)
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  37. Molyneux's questions.Peter Baurnann - 2004 - In Ralph Schumacher (ed.), Perception and Reality: From Descartes to the Present. Mentis. pp. 168.
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  38.  19
    Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch and the Philosophy of Perception.George Pitcher & Michael J. Morgan - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (2):304.
  39. Space, Time and Molyneux's Question.Louise Richardson - 2014 - Ratio 27 (4):483-505.
    Whatever the answer to Molyneux's question is, it is certainly not obvious that the answer is ‘yes’. In contrast, it seems clear that we should answer affirmatively a temporal variation on Molyneux's question, introduced by Gareth Evans. I offer a phenomenological explanation of this asymmetry in our responses to the two questions. This explanation appeals to the modality-specific spatial structure of perceptual experience and its amodal temporal structure. On this explanation, there are differences in the perception of spatial (...)
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  40.  31
    Is Locke’s answer to Molyneux’s question inconsistent? Cross-modal recognition and the sight–recognition error.Anna Vaughn - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    Molyneux’s question asks whether someone born blind, who could distinguish cubes from spheres using his tactile sensation, could recognize those objects if he received his sight. Locke says no: the newly sighted person would fail to point to the cube and call it a cube. Locke never provided a complete explanation for his negative response, and there are concerns of inconsistency with other important aspects of his theory of ideas. These charges of inconsistency rest upon an unrecognized and unfounded (...)
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  41.  14
    Reid’s Answer to Molyneux’s Question.James Van Cleve - 2007 - The Monist 90 (2):251-270.
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  42.  46
    Molyneux's question: Vision, touch, and the philosophy of perception. [REVIEW]Sara Shute - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):255-257.
  43.  15
    Molyneux’s Question and the History of Philosophy.Silvia Parigi - 2021 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):189-193.
    This book is a collection of essays, dealing with one of the most interesting topics in the history of ideas, particularly in the history of theories of visual perception: the question posed by Wil...
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  44.  51
    Molyneux's Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Forms. Marjolein Degenaar, Michael J. Collins.J. Scott Hauger - 1997 - Isis 88 (4):701-702.
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  45.  4
    Molyneux’s Question and the History of Philosophy: Gabriele Ferretti and Brian Glenney (Eds.), London, Routledge, 2021 xiv + 356 pp., ISBN 978-0-367-03092-6, £190.00 (hardback); ISBN 9780429020377, £ 35.99. [REVIEW]Silvia Parigi - 2020 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):189-193.
    This book is a collection of essays, dealing with one of the most interesting topics in the history of ideas, particularly in the history of theories of visual perception: the question posed by Wil...
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  46. Many Molyneux Questions.Mohan Matthen & Jonathan Cohen - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (1):47-63.
    Molyneux's Question (MQ) concerns whether a newly sighted man would recognize/distinguish a sphere and a cube by vision, assuming he could previously do this by touch. We argue that (MQ) splits into questions about (a) shared representations of space in different perceptual systems, and about (b) shared ways of constructing higher dimensional spatiotemporal features from information about lower dimensional ones, most of the technical difficulty centring on (b). So understood, MQ resists any monolithic answer: everything depends on the constraints (...)
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  47. The real Molyneux question and the basis of Locke's answer.Martha Brandt Bolton - 1994 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
  48.  13
    Molyneux's Question.M. J. Morgan - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (2):301-303.
  49.  16
    Is Locke’s answer to Molyneux’s question inconsistent? Cross-modal recognition and the sight–recognition error.Anna Vaughn - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (5):670-688.
    Molyneux’s question asks whether someone born blind, who could distinguish cubes from spheres using his tactile sensation, could recognize those objects if he received his sight. Locke says no: the newly sighted person would fail to point to the cube and call it a cube. Locke never provided a complete explanation for his negative response, and there are concerns of inconsistency with other important aspects of his theory of ideas. These charges of inconsistency rest upon an unrecognized and unfounded (...)
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  50.  23
    Intra-household relations and treatment decision-making for childhood illness: a Kenyan case study.C. S. Molyneux, G. Murira, J. Masha & R. W. Snow - 2002 - Journal of Biosocial Science 34 (1):109-132.
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