Results for 'S. de Laat'

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  1.  33
    Richard of St Victor's de Trinitate: Augustinian or Abelardian?John Bligh & J. S. - 1960 - Heythrop Journal 1 (2):118–139.
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  2.  27
    Stijlen Van ethisch argumenteren in de laat-moderne tijd.Gerard de Vries - 2004 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (4):649-665.
    A cursory view of the history of ethical thinking shows the presence of a limited variety of 'styles of ethical reasoning', a term used in analogy of Crombie's 'styles of scientific reasoning' for systems of thought that set their own standards and techniques for providing evidence. Each style of reasoning tends to suggest a specific role for ethicists. Styles are appropriate relative to particular contexts of problems and require special institutions to flourish. Herman De Dijn's discussion in Taboes, monsters en (...)
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  3. La imagen narrativa de Dios en C. S. Lewis, una lectura de “Las crónicas de Narnia”.Adán Salinas - 1999 - Boletín de Filosofía (10):261-278.
    El artículo propone una interpretación de la obra literaria "Las Crónicas de Narnia" del autor ingles C. S Lewis. Tal interpretación posibilita considerar la alegoría religiosa que esta obra literaria realiza sobre la experiencia de la divinidad a través de la figura del León.
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  4. Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics.Tove Pettersen - 2015 - In Tove Pettersen Annlaug Bjørsnøs (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir – A Humanist Thinker. Brill/Rodopi. pp. 69-91.
    In "Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics" Tove Pettersen elucidates the close connection between Beauvoir’s ethics and humanism, and argues that her humanism is an existential humanism. Beauvoir’s concept of freedom is inspected, followed by a discussion of her reasons for making moral freedom the leading normative value, and her claim that we must act for humanity. In Beauvoir’s ethics, freedom is not reserved for the elite, but understood as everyone being “able to surpass the given (...)
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  5.  23
    Characterizing Belnap's Logic Via De Morgan's Laws.Alexej P. Pynko - 1995 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 41 (4):442-454.
    The aim of this paper is technically to study Belnap's four-valued sentential logic . First, we obtain a Gentzen-style axiomatization of this logic that contains no structural rules while all they are still admissible in the Gentzen system what is proved with using some algebraic tools. Further, the mentioned logic is proved to be the least closure operator on the set of {Λ, V, ⌝}-formulas satisfying Tarski's conditions for classical conjunction and disjunction together with De Morgan's laws for negation. It (...)
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  6.  30
    Os diagramas de C. S. Peirce para as dez classes de signos.Priscila Lena Farias & João Queiroz - 2013 - Trans/Form/Ação 36 (3):155-172.
    Uma seção da Gramática Especulativa de C.S.Peirce – Dez classes de signos – recebeu, a partir de 1903, um importante tratamento diagramático. Neste artigo, são apresentados e discutidos dois diagramas desenvolvidos por Peirce para as dez classes, incluindo esboços desses modelos.
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  7.  8
    En Italie, frères et sœurs au vent de la Révolution.Benedetta Borello - 2011 - Clio 34:61-84.
    La fin du xviiie siècle et le début du xixe coïncident en Italie non seulement avec de grandes mutations politiques et juridiques liées aux guerres napoléoniennes, mais aussi avec de profondes transformations des rôles familiaux. À travers l’analyse d’une série de correspondances épistolaires échangées dans cette période entre des frères et des sœurs membres de familles de l’aristocratie, l’article examine la manière dont l’interprétation du rôle des individus a pu se modifier et les attentes que ces derniers ont entretenues quand (...)
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  8.  38
    There is No Searching for the Self: Self-Knowledge in Book Ten of Augustine’s De Trinitate.Mateusz Stróżyński - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (3):280-300.
    This article explores the conception of self-knowledge in book 10 of Augustine’s De Trinitate. Augustine starts from the worry in Plato’s Meno that one cannot search for something entirely unknown and engages with Plotinus, Ennead 5.3 in developing his own understanding of the mind’s self-knowledge. He concludes that this knowledge is paradoxical in nature: it is necessary and, at the same time, futile; and it is separated from the knowledge of God. Augustine reaches this point by rejecting the Aristotelian identity (...)
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  9. Touching, Thinking, Being: The Sense of Touch in Aristotle's De Anima and its Implications.Pascal Massie - 2013 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):74-101.
    Aristotle’s treatment of tactility is at odds with the hierarchical order of psyche’s faculties. Touching is the commonest and lowest power; it is possessed by all sentient beings; thinking is, on the contrary, the highest faculty that distinguishes human beings. Yet, while Aristotle maintains against some of his predecessors that to think is not to sense, he nevertheless posits a causal link between practical intelligence and tactility and even describes noetic activity as a certain kind of touch. This essay elucidates (...)
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  10.  93
    Truth and Contradiction in Aristotle’s De Interpretatione 6-9.Russell E. Jones - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (1):26-67.
    In De Interpretatione 6-9, Aristotle considers three logical principles: the principle of bivalence, the law of excluded middle, and the rule of contradictory pairs (according to which of any contradictory pair of statements, exactly one is true and the other false). Surprisingly, Aristotle accepts none of these without qualification. I offer a coherent interpretation of these chapters as a whole, while focusing special attention on two sorts of statements that are of particular interest to Aristotle: universal statements not made universally (...)
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  11.  41
    Mortal Imitations of Divine Life: The Nature of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima.Eli Diamond - 2015 - Northwestern University Press.
    In Mortal Imitations of Divine Life, Diamond offers an interpretation of De Anima, which explains how and why Aristotle places souls in a hierarchy of value. Aristotle’s central intention in De Anima is to discover the nature and essence of soul—the prin­ciple of living beings. He does so by identifying the common structures underlying every living activity, whether it be eating, perceiving, thinking, or moving through space. As Diamond demonstrates through close readings of De Anima, the nature of the soul (...)
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  12.  87
    The Problem of Temporality in the Literary Framework of Nicholas of Cusa’s De Pace Fidei.Jason Aleksander - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (2):135-145.
    This paper explores Nicholas of Cusa’s framing of the De pace fidei as a dialogue taking place incaelo rationis. On the one hand, this framing allows Nicholas of Cusa to argue that all religious rites presuppose the truth of a single, unified faith and so temporally manifest divine logos in a way accommodated to the historically unique conventions of different political communities. On the other hand, at the end of the De pace fidei, the interlocutors in the heavenly dialogue are (...)
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  13.  31
    On Grotius's Mare Liberum and Vitoria's De Indis, Following Agamben and Schmitt.Johannes Thumfart - 2009 - Grotiana 30 (1):65-87.
    The idea of free trade in Grotius's Mare liberum and his legal opinion De iure praedae has a strong theological basis. Grotius called the right to travel and trade freely a ius sanctissimum, a 'sacrosanct law'. He also perceived the Freedom of the Seas as being a direct result of the will of God. This theological background was strategically necessary because Grotius developed the Mare liberum and the De iure praedae to argue against Spanish-Portuguese claims to a trade monopoly that (...)
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  14.  11
    Political and Ecclesiological Contexts for the Early English Translations of Grotius’s De Veritate. [REVIEW]Marco Barducci - 2012 - Grotiana 33 (1):70-87.
    Grotius’s attempt to find a compromise both between reason and revelation, and between free will and predestination, his philological approach to the reading of Scripture, his refusal to engage in doctrinal disputes, and his insistence on ethics as the core of Christian teaching, were increasingly important in shaping a powerful strand of thinking about the Anglican church from the Great Tew circle to post-Restoration latitudinarianism. The references to Grotius’s apologetic work which appeared in moderate Anglican writing should be understood by (...)
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  15.  35
    9. Secundum Intentionem Doctoris Subtilis: The Commentaries on Porphyry’s Isagoge and Aristotle’s De Anima by Walter of Wervia.Paul J. J. M. Bakker & Femke J. Kok - 2014 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 56:263-279.
    This contribution offers a detailed presentation of the commentaries on Porphyry’s Isagoge and Aristotle’s De anima by Walter of Wervia. Walter wrote his commentaries between 1445 and 1472 at the University of Paris. Both works bear witness to the influence of John Duns Scotus and Scotism on Parisian Masters of Arts.
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  16.  25
    1. An Unidentified Version of Achard of Saint-Victor’s De Discretione Animae, Spiritus Et Mentis in Oxford, Exeter College Library, Ms. 23.Caterina Tarlazzi - 2014 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 56:31-59.
    Oxford, Exeter College Library, Ms. 23, ff. 195va-198ra, transmits a miscellany of psychological texts, divided into various sections. This article shows that the first sections of the miscellany reproduce most of Achard of Saint-Victor's De discretione animae, spiritus et mentis, but arrange its material in a different order from DASM and express similar ideas with different wording or word-order. OxDASM would seem to be, or derive from, an unknown version of DASM. The text in Oxford, Exeter College Library, Ms. 23 (...)
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  17.  47
    Cicero's De Officiis.David S. Brown - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (2):151-159.
    The goal of this paper is to increase interest in Cicero’s “De Officiis” as both a textbook and resource for developing curricula at the secondary and post-secondary level. The paper begins by tracing the extensive influence that the work has had in ethics, political philosophy, literature, and education before proceeding to an explanation for why its influence has waned since the nineteenth century. Next, the paper contends that “De Officiis” addresses some of the most relevant and pressing questions in ethics. (...)
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  18.  7
    Cicero’s De Officiis: Ancient Ethics for Modern Times.David S. Brown - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (2):151-159.
    The goal of this paper is to increase interest in Cicero’s “De Officiis” as both a textbook and resource for developing curricula at the secondary and post-secondary level. The paper begins by tracing the extensive influence that the work has had in ethics, political philosophy, literature, and education before proceeding to an explanation for why its influence has waned since the nineteenth century. Next, the paper contends that “De Officiis” addresses some of the most relevant and pressing questions in ethics. (...)
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  19.  24
    The Manuscripts of Cicero's De Oratore: E is a Descendant of A.D. S. A. Renting - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):183-.
    The manuscripts of Cicero's De oratore divide into two families: mutili and integri. The oldest representatives of the mutilated family are Avranches 238 , Erlangen 380 , and London, Harley 2736 . A and H are independent of each other, and the best witnesses to the text of the lost archetype . E too is considered to be an independent witness. Since the work of E. Ströbel, dating from the early eighties of the last century, the view has been generally (...)
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  20. Affects and Activity in Leibniz's De Affectibus.Markku Roinila - 2015 - In Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz’s Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation. Springer. pp. 73-88.
    In this paper I will discuss the doctrine of substance which emerges from Leibniz’s unpublished early memoir De affectibus of 1679. The memoir marks a new stage in Leibniz’s views of the mind. The motivation for this change can be found in Leibniz’s rejection of the Cartesian theory of passion and action in the 1670s. His early Aristotelianism and some features of Cartesianism persisted to which Leibniz added influences from Hobbes and Spinoza. His nascent dynamical concept of substance is seemingly (...)
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  21. Essays on Aristotle's De Anima.Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.) - 1992/1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together a group of outstanding new essays on Aristotle's De Anima, this book covers topics such as the relation between soul and body, sense-perception, imagination, memory, desire, and thought, which present the philosophical substance of Aristotle's views to the modern reader. The contributors write with philosophical subtlety and wide-ranging scholarship, locating their interpretations firmly within the context of Aristotle's thought as a whole.u.
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  22.  14
    Plutarch's de Fortuna Romanorum.S. C. R. Swain - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (02):504-.
    Plutarch's essay de fortuna Romanorum has attracted divergent judgements. Ziegler dismissed it as ‘eine nicht weiter ernst zu nehmende rhetorische Stilübung’. By Flacelière it was hailed as ‘une ébauche de méditation sur le prodigieux destin de Rome’. It is time to consider the work afresh and to discover whether there is common ground between these two views. Rather than offering a general appreciation, my treatment will take the work chapter by chapter, considering points of interest as they arise. This method (...)
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  23. A Renaissance Humanist's View of His Intellectual and Cultural Environment in the Year 1438: Lapo da Castiglionchio Jr.'S "de Curie Commodis".Christopher S. Celenza - 1995 - Dissertation, Duke University
    Lapo da Castiglionchio the Younger was a Florentine Renaissance humanist who died in 1438 at the age of thirty-three. He took part in one of the most interesting phases of Italian Renaissance humanism and achieved in his short lifetime a modest reputation as a first-rate Greek to Latin translator. Less well known is the fact that he wrote a fair amount of prose works. One of the most interesting of these is a treatise which he composed in the year of (...)
     
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  24.  77
    Aristotle's de Anima: A Critical Commentary.Ronald Polansky - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's De Anima is the first systematic philosophical account of the soul, which serves to explain the functioning of all mortal living things. In his commentary, Ronald Polansky argues that the work is far more structured and systematic than previously supposed. He contends that Aristotle seeks a comprehensive understanding of the soul and its faculties. By closely tracing the unfolding of the many-layered argumentation and the way Aristotle fits his inquiry meticulously within his scheme of the sciences, Polansky answers questions (...)
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  25. The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima.Lloyd Gerson - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion up until this passage.1 This (...)
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  26.  25
    "Self-Knowledge and the Science of the Soul in Buridan's Quaestiones De Anima".Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the Soul by John Buridan and Others: A Companion to John Buridan's Philosophy of Mind.
    Buridan holds that the proper subject of psychology (i.e., the science undertaken in Aristotle’s De Anima) is the soul, its powers, and characteristic functions. But, on his view, the science of psychology should not be understood as including the body nor even the soul-body composite as its proper subject. Rather its subject is just “the soul in itself and its powers and functions insofar as they stand on the side of the soul". Buridan takes it as obvious that, even thus (...)
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  27. Nous in Aristotle's De Anima.Caleb Murray Cohoe - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (9):594-604.
    I lay out and examine two sharply conflicting interpretations of Aristotle's claims about nous in the De Anima (DA). On the human separability approach, Aristotle is taken to have identified reasons for thinking that the intellect can, in some way, exist on its own. On the naturalist approach, the soul, including intellectual soul, is inseparable from the body of which it is the form. I discuss how proponents of each approach deal with the key texts from the DA, focusing on (...)
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  28.  14
    Historical and Systematic Approaches of Pseudo-Dionysious the Areopagite’s De Divinis Nominibus.Christos Terezis & Lydia Petridou - 2018 - Augustinianum 58 (1):231-249.
    This is a case study of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite’s De divinis nominibus, a text about God’s names and properties in which human effort to comprehend the projections of the divine energies is described. We specifically focus our attention on the Paraphrasis of George Pachymeres, who was one of the most important representatives of the Palaeologan Renaissance and a great commentator on Pseudo-Dionysius’ works. His introduction to the De divinis nominibus provides us with the opportunity to approach it in two ways: (...)
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  29.  33
    The Nature and Functions of Loci in Agricola's De Inuentione Dialectica.Eddo Rigotti - 2014 - Argumentation 28 (1):19-37.
    This paper aims to single out and to highlight the fundamental tenets of Agricola’s De inuentione dialectica. After the structure of the volume, its theoretical perspective and its educational concern are illustrated, Agricola’s understanding of the fundamental notion of locus is expounded. In this relation his particular use of the medieval term habitudo and the exclusion of maxims, which had been the main concern of the Medieval doctrine of loci, show a certain distance from the Medieval tradition. Several innovative and (...)
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  30. A Commentary on Aristotle's ’de Anima'.Thomas Aquinas - 1999 - Yale University Press.
    This new translation of Thomas Aquinas’s most important study of Aristotle casts bright light on the thinking of both philosophers. Using a new text of Aquinas’s original Latin commentary, Robert Pasnau provides a precise translation that will enable students to undertake close philosophical readings. He includes an introduction and notes to set context and clarify difficult points as well as a translation of the medieval Latin version of Aristotle’s _De anima _ so that readers can refer to the text Aquinas (...)
     
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  31. Aristotle's De Anima : On Why the Soul is Not a Set of Capacities.Rebekah Johnston - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):185-200.
    Although it is common for interpreters of Aristotle's De Anima to treat the soul as a specially related set of powers of capacities, I argue against this view on the grounds that the plausible options for reconciling the claim that the soul is a set of powers with Aristotle's repeated claim that the soul is an actuality cannot be unsuccessful. Moreover, I argue that there are good reasons to be wary of attributing to Aristotle the view that the soul is (...)
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  32.  3
    Political Friendship in Medicean Florence: Palmieri's Vita Civile and Platina's De Optimo Cive.Annalisa Ceron - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (3):301-317.
    SummaryIn this article, I examine friendship as a subject of political theory rather than as a social practice relevant to political life. As suggested by Francesco d'Altobianco Alberti in the poem recited at the first certame coronario, two ideas of political friendship existed side by side in Medicean Florence. They appeared in full in Palmieri's Vita civile and in Platina's De optimo cive. As I will show, the Ciceronian language of friendship is used in these works to resolve two key (...)
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  33.  19
    Harvey's De Generatione: Its Origins and Relevance to the Theory of Circulation.C. Webster - 1967 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (3):262-274.
    De generatione was the last of the three works published by William Harvey during his lifetime. Although this work on generation was most ambitious, being the product of prolonged and detailed researches, it has received relatively little attention from modern writers. It is generally felt that this work, like William Gilbert's De mundo, departs significantly from the more pronounced empirical approach to science which characterized Harvey's first publication, De motu cordis. De generatione shows that Harvey regarded reference to teleological and (...)
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  34.  11
    Christian Wolff’s Lectures on Grotius’s De Iure Belli Ac Pacis From 1739–1740.Frank Grunert & Béla Kapossy - 2017 - Grotiana 38 (1):229-233.
    _ Source: _Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 229 - 233 This note announces a recent find in a private Swiss archive: Christian Wolff’s complete lecture course on Grotius’s _De iure belli ac pacis_ that he gave at the University of Marburg between June 1739 and May 1740.
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  35.  24
    Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'.David Saunders & Ian Hunter - 2003 - History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core political (...)
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  36.  5
    Science, Religion, and Politics in Restoration England: Richard Cumberland's De Legibus Naturae.Jon Parkin - 1999 - Royal Historical Society/Boydell Press.
    A new perspective on the interaction of science, religion and politics in Restoration England, based on discussion of Cumberland's De legibus naturae.
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  37.  29
    Rational Behaviour: A Comparison Between the Theory Stemming From de Finetti's Work and Some Other Leading Theories.Guido A. Rossi - 1994 - Theory and Decision 36 (3):257-275.
  38.  16
    An Early European Critic of Hobbes’s De Corpore.Stephen Clucas - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):4-27.
    _ Source: _Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 4 - 27 The _Animadversiones in Elementorum Philosophiae_ by a little known Flemish scholar G. Moranus, published in Brussels in 1655 was an early European response to Hobbes’s _De Corpore_. Although it is has been referred to by various Hobbes scholars, such as Noel Malcolm, Doug Jesseph, and Alexander Bird it has been little studied. Previous scholarship has tended to focus on the mathematical criticisms of André Tacquet which Moranus included in the form (...)
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  39.  46
    Bonaventure's De Reductione Artium Ad Theologiam and Its Early Reception as an Inaugural Sermon.Joshua C. Benson - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):7-24.
    This essay further substantiates the author’s earlier thesis that St. Bonaventure’s De reductione was the second half (or resumptio) of his inaugural lecture atParis. After reviewing the central aspect of that thesis, the essay further shows how an unedited inaugural sermon, Fons sapientiae Verbum Dei in excelsis (found in Vatican Burghesiani 157) received the De reductione in its earliest form, particularly in its use of specific authorities and its division of the lights of knowledge. The discovery of this sermon further (...)
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  40.  33
    McCaghwell’s Reading of Scotus’s De Anima.Anna Tropia - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (1-2):95-115.
    In this paper the authors deals with the relation between the Irish Franciscan Hugh McCaghwell’s commentary on Scotus’s De anima (1639) and Suárez’s (1621). It is shown that the latter provided a model and a reference text for McCaghwell who reproduces the philosopher’s thought within his commentary. Moreover, the explicit and implicit quotations of Suárez are taken into account: far from admitting his debt, McCaghwell criticizes the philosopher when he does not seem to follow the Scotist path. The commentary’s sections (...)
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  41.  34
    In Cicero's De Finibus, an Ars Vitae Between Technê and Theôria.Robin Weiss - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):351-384.
    Cicero’s De Finibus contains a debate about whether practical knowledge should be compared to theoretical knowledge (theôreia/sapientia), or to technical knowledge (technê/ars). The way in which practical knowledge is conceived by the Stoics on the one hand, and Peripatetics on the other, lies behind and explains, for Cicero, the tendency of Peripatetics to place greater priority upon harmony with the external world, and that of the Stoics to seek inner harmony at the cost of harmony with that external world. The (...)
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  42.  31
    The Reordering of Relationships in John Chrysostom's « De Sacerdotio ».Andrew Hofer - 2011 - Augustinianum 51 (2):451-471.
    John Chrysostom’s De sacerdotio offers a reordering of social relationships that can be seen in comparison with the life and writings of Gregory of Nazianzus.Chrysostom understands that the priest’s relationship with Christ carries the priest above the laws of relationship governing earthly society, such as in friendship and family. By emphasizing the priesthood’s transcendent character even further than what Gregory had done, Chrysostom frees the priest from the pressures of constricting social laws so that the priest may live according to (...)
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  43.  37
    On the Life of Thinking in Aristotle's De Anima.Russell Winslow - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):299-316.
    In “On the Life of thinking in Aristotle’s De Anima,” the author offers an interpretation of the tripartite structure of the unified soul in Aristotle’s text. The principleactivity that unities the nutritive, sensuously perceptive and noetically perceptive parts of the soul into a single, continuous entity is shown by our author to be genesis. After establishing this observation, the paper provides the textual grounds to understand how both sensuous and noetic perception can be understood as a kind of embodied genesis. (...)
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  44.  14
    A humanist in the kitchen. Platina's De honesta voluptate et valetudine.Annalisa Ceron - 2015 - Doctor Virtualis 13.
    Questo articolo analizza il De honesta voluptate et valetudine di Platina come esempio emblematico per mostrare che un'accurata analisi filologica può aiutare non solo a chiarire i contesti teorici in cui un'opera può essere collocata, ma anche a fornire una miglior comprensione delle sue implicazioni filosofiche. In questo lavoro letterario, che è sia un libro di cucina sia un manuale di dietetica, Platina ha intrecciato una varietà di fonti antiche e moderne, più o meno riconoscibili: egli non si è limitato (...)
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  45.  2
    John Calvin as ‘Public Theologian’ in View of His ‘Commentary on Seneca’s de Clementia’.Wim A. Dreyer - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (4):1-8.
    During the 16th century, Europe underwent fundamental sociopolitical changes, which challenged theologians and the church to respond theologically. In light of the celebration of the Reformation and the theme of this conference, this contribution presents Calvin as a 'public theologian'. To this purpose it is necessary to define 'public theology', describe the sociopolitical changes which challenged theologians during the 16th century, and lastly to focus on Calvin's contribution to the discourse. Because of the vast amount of material that is available, (...)
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  46.  33
    Boehner’s Text of Walter Burley’s De Puritate Artis Logicae: Some Corrections and Queries.Paul Vincent Spade - manuscript
    I am preparing an English translation of both the Tractatus longior and the Tractatus brevior of Walter Burley’s De puritate artis logicae for the “Yale Library of Medieval Philosophy.” My translation is based of course on the 1955 critical edition by Philotheus Boehner, the only reasonably reliable text available. Nevertheless, in preparing my translation, I have had several occasions to question or correct readings in Boehner’s edition. In some instances the corrections are merely obvious typographical errors, but in others there (...)
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  47.  15
    The Argument for the Sphericity of the Universe Inaristotle's de Caelo: Astronomy and Physics.Pierre Pellegrin - 2009 - In A. C. Bowen & C. Wildberg (eds.), New Perspectives on Aristotle’s de Caelo. Brill. pp. 117--163.
  48.  13
    The Myth in Plutarch's De Facie (940F—945D).W. Hamilton - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):24-.
    In a former paper I endeavoured to show that the myth in Plutarch's de facie is a conscious imitation on a small scale of the Timaeus of Plato, and that therefore we might conclude that Plutarch, who regarded the Timaeus as serious philosophy, intended the main point of his own myth, the derivation of mind, soul and body from the sun, moon and earth respectively, to be taken literally. This conclusion will be equally true of the myth of the de (...)
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  49.  12
    Aristotle's de Caelo.A. Bibliography - 2009 - In A. C. Bowen & C. Wildberg (eds.), New Perspectives on Aristotle’s de Caelo. Brill. pp. 117--283.
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  50.  9
    From Sapientia Honorabilissima to Nobilitas Animae. A Note on the Concept of “Nobility” in Ulrich of Strasbourg’s De Summo Bono.Andrea Colli - 2015 - Quaestio 15:487-496.
    In many respects, the adjective “noble” plays a significant role in Ulrich of Strasbourg’s De summo bono. It defines contemplative happiness and philosophical wisdom, and delineates a remarkable character of the intellect. In examining some significant occurrences of the term, I intend to focus my attention on its theoretical meaning and on the sources which have influenced its use. In this way, I will demonstrate that “nobility” is a necessary, key factor for investigating what the real pleasure of knowledge consists (...)
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